07.19.2013
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Expert Reviews
Last Updated:07.19.2013
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Tested on animals:No

Wrinkle Concentrate is supposed to be a specialty treatment product and could have been a great option given its almost-stellar formula. The main negative—lavender oil—is a big deal in terms of problems for skin, as we explain in More Info.

Interestingly, the mineral and bacteria ferment ingredients that are front and center in the formula are the least intriguing because of the utter lack of research supporting their benefits for skin. In contrast, the peptide (carnosine), sodium hyaluronate, and numerous antioxidants all have merit for skin, so it's a shame they aren't present in amounts greater than the less-than-exciting minerals.

Labeling this a "miraculous formula" is a stretch of the imagination. What this product can do is make skin softer and smoother (which in turn makes wrinkles less apparent), and the beneficial ingredients can fight environmental damage and heal skin, but so can lots of products. The real miracle for aging skin is any product that contains a brilliant mix of good ingredients without any bad ingredients.

Pros:
  • Contains a very good mix of anti-aging ingredients, including antioxidants and cell-communicating ingredients.
Cons:
  • Not a miracle worker for wrinkles.
  • Lavender oil is a source of irritation.
More Info:

Research indicates that components of lavender, specifically linalool, can be cytotoxic, which means that topical application causes skin-cell death (Source: Cell Proliferation, June 2004, pages 221–229). Lavender leaves contain camphor, which is a known skin irritant. Because the fragrance constituents in lavender oil oxidize when exposed to air, lavender oil is a pro-oxidant, and this enhanced oxidation increases its irritancy on skin (Source: Contact Dermatitis, September 2008, pages 143–150). Lavender oil is the most potent form, and even small amounts of it (0.25% or less) are problematic. Although it's fine as an aromatherapy agent for inhalation or relaxation, it is a must to avoid in skin-care products (Sources: Psychiatry Research, February 2007, pages 89–96; and www.naturaldatabase.com).

Community Reviews
Claims

Reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles with this targeted skin-plumping concentrate. The miraculous formula melts into skin to instantly reveal smoother, unbelievably softer, younger-looking skin with improved texture.

Ingredients

Water, Glycerin, PPG-3 Benzyl Ether Myristate, Lactobacillus/Eriodictyon Califormicum Ferment Extract, Rhodochrosite Extract, Smithsonite Extract, Cetearyl Olivate, Hematite Extract, Sorbitan Olivate, Palmitoyl Glycine, Dipalmitoyl Hydroxyproline, Myristyl Myristate, Soil Minerals, Palmitoyl Tripeptide-5, Carnosine, Sodium Hyaluronate, Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Licorice) Root Extract, Retinyl Palmitate, Tocopheryl Acetate, Ascorbyl Palmitate, Actinidia Chinensis (Kiwi) Fruit Extract, Ananas Sativus (Pineapple) Fruit Extract, Litchi Chinensis Fruit Extract, Garcinia Mangostana Fruit Extract, Punica Granatum Extract, Zizyphus Jujuba Fruit Extract, Passiflora Incarnata Fruit Extract, Psidium Guajava Fruit Extract, Averrhoa Carambola Fruit Extract, Beta-Glucan, Phytosphingosine, Ceramide 3, Ceramide 6 II, Ceramide 1, Phospholipids, Sodium Lauroyl Lactylate, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Extract, Avena Sativa (Oat) Kernel Extract, Panthenol, Anthemis Nobilis Flower Extract, Distarch Phosphate, Cholesterol, Glycine Soja (Soybean) Oil, Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender) Oil, Lavandula Hybridia (Lavandin) Oil, Anthemis Nobilis Flower Oil, Benzyl Alcohol, Yeast Extract, C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Carbomer, Xanthan Gum, Aminomethyl Propanol.

Brand Overview

Bare Escentuals At-a-Glance

Makeup is what this San Francisco-based cosmetics line is primarily about, and they use the pure and natural marketing angle to entice consumers. Founded in 1976 by Diane Ranger, who left the company in the early '90s Bare Escentuals was one of the first brands to introduce the concept of loose powder foundation. Since then, they have moved beyond it to include liquid foundations and tinted moisturizers and an ever expanding line of color cosmetics as well as skincare products.

The products are sold in most Sephora boutiques and Ulta stores, though the full selection of skincare products is most often found at the Bare Escentuals freestanding stores scattered throughout the United States.

We should note that loose powder makeup does take some practice to get the hang of—yet there is no denying that this type of foundation has its fan base. There is a lot to love about Bare Escentuals, even if mineral makeup isn’t your thing (especially their price ranges, which have remained affordable in comparison to many of their neighbors at Sephora).

Strengths: Good makeup removers; a few well-formulated powders with SPF; some nice eyeshadows and impressive mascaras; some impressive foundations; several elegant brush options; not too expensive.

Weaknesses: Some of the loose powder products have texture and finish concerns; some of the skincare contain potentially problematic ingredients.

For more information about Bare Escentuals, call 1.888.795.4747 or visit www.bareescentuals.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Bare Escentuals At-a-Glance

Makeup is what this San Francisco-based cosmetics line is primarily about, and they use the pure and natural marketing angle to entice consumers. Founded in 1976 by Diane Ranger, who left the company in the early '90s Bare Escentuals was one of the first brands to introduce the concept of loose powder foundation. Since then, they have moved beyond it to include liquid foundations and tinted moisturizers and an ever expanding line of color cosmetics as well as skincare products.

The products are sold in most Sephora boutiques and Ulta stores, though the full selection of skincare products is most often found at the Bare Escentuals freestanding stores scattered throughout the United States.

We should note that loose powder makeup does take some practice to get the hang of—yet there is no denying that this type of foundation has its fan base. There is a lot to love about Bare Escentuals, even if mineral makeup isn’t your thing (especially their price ranges, which have remained affordable in comparison to many of their neighbors at Sephora).

Strengths: Good makeup removers; a few well-formulated powders with SPF; some nice eyeshadows and impressive mascaras; some impressive foundations; several elegant brush options; not too expensive.

Weaknesses: Some of the loose powder products have texture and finish concerns; some of the skincare contain potentially problematic ingredients.

For more information about Bare Escentuals, call 1.888.795.4747 or visit www.bareescentuals.com.