02.16.2015
1
Glow Sugar Scrub
8 fl. oz. for $38
Expert Rating
Community Rating (3)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:02.16.2015
Jar Packaging:Yes
Tested on animals:No

This sugar scrub from Beautycounter had the potential to be a good option for normal skin, but is derailed by the inclusion of fragrant plant oils that can serve as irritants—and irritation isn't good for skin, whether on your face or elsewhere on your body!

As a physical exfoliant, sugar is actually one of the better options because it dissolves easily in water, unlike harsher natural exfoliants like salt, pumice, or walnut shells. That means that here you'll get the benefits of a scrub without tearing skin, and you'll get some moisturizing benefits from the included sweet almond oil, apricot oil, and sunflower oil.

Regrettably, there are plenty of other oils in here that only serve your nose, not your skin. Lime oil, lemon peel oil, grapefruit peel oil, lemongrass oil, orange peel oil, and bergamot oil all have strong potential to cause inflammation, as well as contact dermatitis. Such a reaction is not a healthy glow, from any perspective.

What a shame, because there's a host of beneficial plant oils that Beautycounter could have used instead of the fragrant oils they chose. While those citrus oils might smell nice, as we've said time and again, fragrance isn't skincare! Definitely give this one a pass, and check out one of the far superior options on our list of Best Scrubs.

Last, the jar packaging is messy to use in the shower, and it's almost impossible to keep water from getting into the product as you dig in to get the scrub out and onto your skin.

Pros:

  • Contains sugar as the exfoliant, which is a gentle scrub material.
  • Contains beneficial emollients like sweet almond oil, apricot kernel oil, and sunflower oil.

Cons:

  • Contains several fragrant oils that have strong potential to irritate skin.
Community Reviews
Claims
Polish skin to a healthy glow with this scrub for the body. Brown sugar buffs away dull skin cells while mineral-rich evening primrose, sweet almond, apricot kernel, and sunflower oils leave skin looking supple and smooth. Body bonus: açai berry extract delivers antioxidants, fatty acids, and natural enzymes to support healthy-looking skin. A refreshing lemongrass scent (derived from a mix of pure essential citrus oils) wakes up the senses.
Ingredients
Sucrose, Prunus Amygdalus Dulcis (Sweet Almond) Oil, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Citrus Aurantifolia (Lime) Oil, Citrus Limon (Lemon) Peel Oil, Oenothera Biennis (Evening Primrose) Oil, Prunus Armeniaca (Apricot) Kernel Oil, Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil, Citrus Grandis (Grapefruit) Peel Oil, Cymbopogon Citratus (Lemon Grass) Leaf Oil, Citrus Aurantium Dulcis (Orange) Peel Oil, Euterpe Oleracea (Acai) Sterols, Citrus Aurantium Bergamia (Bergamot) Fruit Oil, Linoleic Acid, Oleic Acid, Linolenic Acid.
Brand Overview

Beautycounter At-A-Glance

Beautycounter is the brainchild of self-described “serial entrepreneur” Gregg Renfrew, a woman who is perhaps best known for serving on the board of Martha Stewart Living after selling her bridal registry company, The Wedding List, to Stewart’s media empire. Renfrew has worked as a consultant on cosmetics lines from celebrities like Kate Hudson and Jessica Alba.

Renfrew says she decided to start her own cosmetics line after learning that not all the ingredients used in cosmetics were safe, so Beautycounter was launched in 2013. The brand’s primary focus is provide what it calls “safe” skincare to consumers, with its website stating that a rigorous ingredient selection process is used to ensure nothing “harmful” is used.

For all the interest Beautycounter has stirred up, the line is by and large lackluster, and in many cases overpriced for what you get. Many of the formulas start out with potential, but are ultimately derailed by either the inclusion of potential skin irritants or the jar packaging, which will render many of their beneficial ingredients ineffective over time.

Beautycounter products can be purchased through its website or through product consultants who do home sales parties. For more information, visit www.beautycounter.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Beautycounter At-A-Glance

Beautycounter is the brainchild of self-described “serial entrepreneur” Gregg Renfrew, a woman who is perhaps best known for serving on the board of Martha Stewart Living after selling her bridal registry company, The Wedding List, to Stewart’s media empire. Renfrew has worked as a consultant on cosmetics lines from celebrities like Kate Hudson and Jessica Alba.

Renfrew says she decided to start her own cosmetics line after learning that not all the ingredients used in cosmetics were safe, so Beautycounter was launched in 2013. The brand’s primary focus is provide what it calls “safe” skincare to consumers, with its website stating that a rigorous ingredient selection process is used to ensure nothing “harmful” is used.

For all the interest Beautycounter has stirred up, the line is by and large lackluster, and in many cases overpriced for what you get. Many of the formulas start out with potential, but are ultimately derailed by either the inclusion of potential skin irritants or the jar packaging, which will render many of their beneficial ingredients ineffective over time.

Beautycounter products can be purchased through its website or through product consultants who do home sales parties. For more information, visit www.beautycounter.com.