05.02.2013
4
Refined Finish Facial Polish
4.5 fl. oz. for $23
Expert Rating
Community Rating (0)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:05.02.2013
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

This expensive, utterly ordinary facial scrub contains standard, rounded polyethylene beads to polish skin to a smooth finish. The clay (kaolin) in this scrub offers little benefit, but it does make it a bit more difficult to rinse than many other scrubs. Ultimately, this isn’t anything special; for the money, it doesn’t beat exfoliating with a washcloth, facial cleansing brush, or, especially, a well-formulated AHA (alpha hydroxy acid) or BHA (beta hydroxy acid) exfoliant. If you decide to try this, it’s best for combination to oily skin, but there really is no reason to go through the trouble or cost. For additional details on plastic microbeads in cosmetics, see the More Info section below.

Pros:
  • Polyethylene abrasive agent promotes gentle manual exfoliation.
  • Does not overload skin with fragrance or irritants such as menthol.
Cons:
  • Amount of clay (kaolin) makes this scrub more difficult to rinse than many others.
  • Benefits of a scrub pale in comparison to what an AHA or BHA exfoliant can do, especially for signs of aging.
  • Is easily replaced by a gentle washcloth or cleansing brush.
  • Is overpriced for what you get.

More Info:

Plastic Microbeads in Cosmetics: This product contains polyethylene beads, which is an ingredient that has come under controversy in the recent past. In December of 2013, research published in the peer-reviewed journal, Marine Pollution Bulletin demonstrated that although polyethylene beads are non-toxic to humans, they are not filtered during sewage treatment and are accumulating in waterways. This means the beads have the potential to negatively affect marine wildlife who mistakenly consume them (Marine Pollution Bulletin, 2013).

Additional research published in December of 2013 demonstrated that polyethylene beads have the potential to absorb pollutants while in waterways. This research was conducted to establish the potential of absorption, however, and was not conducted using samples from actual waterways (Cell, 2013).

Beautypedia does not take an ideological stance in reviewing skincare products; rather, our reviews are based upon each product's potential harm or benefit to skin contingent upon what independent peer-reviewed scientific research has demonstrated. On issues like polyethylene beads in cosmetics or animal testing, we present the facts without judgment so that you may make your own decision whether or not this product is right for you.

Community Reviews
Claims

This product beautifully brightens the complexion, gently exfoliating to purify skin and help minimize the appearance of pores. Featuring natural clay and seaweed extract rich in minerals, nutrients, and sugars, this formula brings out the skin’s natural radiance.

Ingredients

Water, Polyethylene, Stearic Acid, Kaolin, Palmitic Acid, Glyceryl Stearate, Propylene Glycol Stearate, Butylene Glycol, Pentylene Glycol, Alpha Glucan Oligosaccharide, Phenoxyethanol, Dicaprylyl Carbonate, Fragrance, Triethanolamine, Sodium Hydroxide, Algae Extract, Glycol Acid, Stearalkonium Hectorite, Linalool, Propylene Carbonate, Hexyl Cinnamal, Tocopherol, BHT

Brand Overview

Benefit At-A-Glance

Strengths: Worthwhile foundation and powder options; excellent assortments of blushes and a good bronzer; nice brow-enhancing options; several beautiful lip colors; excellent illuminating products.

Weaknesses: Skincare products could use more innovation (many contain potentially irritating fragrance and have bland formulas).

Benefit was developed by twins Jean Danielson and Jane Blackford, whose initial claim to fame was a stint as the Calgon twins back in 1960s television commercials. They opened their first cosmetics store, The Face Place, in San Francisco circa 1976, and then, perhaps recognizing the need for a name with more impact, The Face Place became Benefit in 1990. From there the line took off and expanded its presence beyond the Bay Area to include national department stores and, eventually, Sephora boutiques.

Benefit's makeup philosophy is outrageously fun, or its product arsenal centered on impossibly cute names and a lexicon that aims to make beauty enjoyable. Benefit single-handedly started the trend of selling makeup and skincare products with ultra-cute appellations for less than ultra-fancy prices. As with most lines, there are enough missteps and problem products to shop carefully, but Benefit shines in several categories, including foundation, bronzing powder, blush, and shimmer products.

Unfortunately, some of the products simply can't live up to their promises. This is mostly true of their skincare formulas, where the showcased ingredients are either present in itsy-bitsy amounts or the claims attributed to them are very exaggerated. Despite this, if you're in the mood for a fun experience and can manage to choose products wisely while enjoying the whimsy, Benefit deserves a look.

For more information about Benefit, call (800) 781-2336 or visit www.Benefitcosmetics.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Benefit At-A-Glance

Strengths: Worthwhile foundation and powder options; excellent assortments of blushes and a good bronzer; nice brow-enhancing options; several beautiful lip colors; excellent illuminating products.

Weaknesses: Skincare products could use more innovation (many contain potentially irritating fragrance and have bland formulas).

Benefit was developed by twins Jean Danielson and Jane Blackford, whose initial claim to fame was a stint as the Calgon twins back in 1960s television commercials. They opened their first cosmetics store, The Face Place, in San Francisco circa 1976, and then, perhaps recognizing the need for a name with more impact, The Face Place became Benefit in 1990. From there the line took off and expanded its presence beyond the Bay Area to include national department stores and, eventually, Sephora boutiques.

Benefit's makeup philosophy is outrageously fun, or its product arsenal centered on impossibly cute names and a lexicon that aims to make beauty enjoyable. Benefit single-handedly started the trend of selling makeup and skincare products with ultra-cute appellations for less than ultra-fancy prices. As with most lines, there are enough missteps and problem products to shop carefully, but Benefit shines in several categories, including foundation, bronzing powder, blush, and shimmer products.

Unfortunately, some of the products simply can't live up to their promises. This is mostly true of their skincare formulas, where the showcased ingredients are either present in itsy-bitsy amounts or the claims attributed to them are very exaggerated. Despite this, if you're in the mood for a fun experience and can manage to choose products wisely while enjoying the whimsy, Benefit deserves a look.

For more information about Benefit, call (800) 781-2336 or visit www.Benefitcosmetics.com.