07.20.2015
2
3
Measured Micrograins +
Rating
2.5 fl. oz. for $44
Category:Skin Care > Scrubs
Last Updated:07.20.2015
Jar Packaging:Yes
Tested on animals:No
Review Overview

Measured Micrograins + is an oatmeal-based scrub, which, in terms of its abrasiveness, is fairly gentle on skin. In a turn for the worse, however, the formula now includes the skin-irritant menthyl lactate as well as a handful of fragrant plant extracts and oils that pose even greater risk to the "unpredictable skin" that Bioelements says this product is good for. Simply put: Just don't do go there!

Measured Micrograins + comes in a jar and has a thick, creamy texture that allows it to double as a mask as promised, but leaving this on skin is no bargain. As mentioned above it contains a slew of potential irritants, chief among them, menthyl lactate which is a used to produce the "calming" cooling sensation you feel while applying this product. While that may sound spa-like and soothing, that cool, tingling sensation is actually your skin's way of telling you that it's being irritated. Even if your skin doesn't appear to be irritated on the surface level, the cumulative damage adds up and can have pro-aging repercussions over time (see More Info).

What about the claim that Measured Micrograins + "controls excess oil to refine pores"? Unfortunately, the irritation it incites can actually make oily, acne-prone skin worse as we explain in the More Info section.

All told, just don't bother with this bad to the bone scrub, and opt for a superior option on our Best Exfoliants list instead.

Pros:
  • Oatmeal as an exfoliating agent is fairly gentle in terms of its abrasiveness.
Cons:
  • Contains multiple irritants that weaken skin, including menthyl lactate.
  • Fragranced formula is the opposite of calming for "unpredictable skin", despite claims.
  • May trigger excess oil production rather than help control it as promised.
More Info:

Inclusion of Known Irritants: Irritation, whether you see it on the surface of your skin or not, causes inflammation and as a result impairs healing, damages collagen, and depletes the vital substances your skin needs to stay young. For this reason, it is best to eliminate, or minimize as much as possible, your exposure to known skin irritants, especially when there are brilliant formulas available that do not include these types of problematic ingredients. Fragrance-free is the best way for all skin types to go for all skin types (Food and Chemical Toxicology, 2008 & American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 2003).

The sneaky part about irritation is that research has demonstrated that you don't always need to see it or feel it for your skin to suffer damage, and that damage may remain hidden for a long time (Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, 2008).

Irritation's Connection to Oily Skin & Breakouts: Inflammation in skin is usually related to external factors such as irritation that damages the skin's barrier in numerous ways, whether you can see the reaction or not. When irritation on the surface of skin happens it activates specific chemicals called neuropeptides in the brain (Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 2007). Those substances are specifically the kind that regulates the hormonal system of the body.

When this happens, it leads to the formation of inflammatory chemicals directly in the oil gland. These inflammatory chemicals trigger an increase in oil production, which can increase the size of the pore, and the likelihood of acne—the more inflammation that occurs, the worse the risk (European Journal of Dermatology, 2002 & Dermatology, 2003).

Bottom line: Inflammation and its resulting irritation, whether internal or external (for this discussion externally it would be due to the use of irritating ingredients, hot water, overusing scrubs, etc.), is practically a guarantee you will see excess production of oil, larger pores and more acne breakouts (Experimental Dermatology, 2009 & Dermato-Endocrinology, 2011).

That's reason enough to avoid products with irritating ingredients, which often come in the form of fragrance including the misnamed "essential" oils.

Claims

Multi-action scrub for all skin types including unpredictable skin.

Ingredients

Water (Aqua, Eau), Glycerin, Colloidal Oatmeal, Kaolin, Aloe Barbadensis (Aloe Vera) Leaf Juice, Cetearyl Alcohol, Polysorbate 60, Titanium Dioxide, Propanediol, Iris Florentina Root Extract, Zinc Sulfate, Retinyl Palmitate, Jojoba Esters, Menthyl Lactate, Allantoin, Pelargonium Graveolens Flower Oil, Rosa Damascena Flower Oil, Cananga Odorata Flower Oil, Anthemis Nobilis Flower Oil, Panax Ginseng (Ginseng) Root Extract, Centella Asiatica (Gotu Kola) Extract, Angelica Polymorpha Sinensis (Dong Quai) Root Extract, Nasturtium Officinale (Watercress) Extract, Rhus Glabra (Sumac) Bark Extract, Polysorbate 20, Cetyl Hydroxyethylcellulose, Phenoxyethanol, Ethylhexylglycerin, Potassium Sorbate, Alcohol.

Brand Overview

Bioelements At-A-Glance

Strengths: Nothing of note beyond an elegantly formulated eye cream and one benzoyl peroxide product.

Weaknesses: Expensive; consistent use of irritating essential oils with no established benefit for skin; problematic anti-acne products, scrubs, and sunscreens.

Bioelements is a spa-and-salon sold skin-care line that was founded in 1991 by makeup artist turned aesthetician, Barbara Salomone. An interview with Salomone in the January/February 2006 issue of Renew magazine had statements from her indicating that aestheticians will soon be recognized as true skin-care professionals and her advice to newcomers is to get as much education as you can. To that end, Bioelements has seven education centers across the United States. However, if they're teaching established and upcoming aestheticians about Bioelements products, we are worried. Few spa lines subject skin to the irritating ingredients dispersed through well over half of the products this line offers. If that isn't bad enough, Bioelements ignores some fundamental aspects of skin care. That means no well-formulated AHA or BHA products (it's not a good formula if it subjects skin to needless irritation), and sunscreens rated below the standard SPF 15 recommendation (sun protection products are vastly outnumbered in this line by moisturizers and serums), not to mention the need to keep light- and air-sensitive ingredients, such as retinol, stable.

Company literature states that at Bioelements "We mean what we say. No gimmicks, no hype, and no false promises. We're professional skin care experts dedicated to keeping skin clean, clear, calm, and younger-looking." That sounds great but barely a word of it is true. This line definitely has its share of hype and false promises, from claiming that probiotics are a youth elixir, to regular references to what the line refers to as "Bioelements Adaptogens" and aromatherapist oils.

It's those very oils that causes havoc for skin, though in a spa experience their aroma can be pleasant. Skin-care experts would know better than to use any of Bioelements' numerous problem products, especially since, with so many irritants in most of the products, clear, calm skin is far from becoming a reality. Any company can establish its own education center, but what's key is the type of education provided and how the information is discussed. We have received countless letters from disheartened aestheticians bemoaning the "education" and classes they sit through, only to be spoon-fed information about skin-care products and practices they know are unhelpful and untrue. They ask me where to turn because they have a sincere interest in helping people take the best possible care of their skin, and are conscientious about the products they recommend. I hope this book helps such aestheticians, because Bioelements and many other spa-oriented lines are not creating products that epitomize state-of-the-art skin care, though they'd love for you to believe otherwise.

For more information about Bioelements, call 800.433.6650 or visit www.bioelements.com.

About the Experts

The new Beautypedia Team proudly and unequivocally maintains the commitment to help you find the best products possible for your skin. We do this by relentlessly pursuing and relying on published scientific research so you will have unbiased information on what works and what doesn't-and the sneaky ways you could be making your skin worse, not better!


The Beautypedia Team reviews all products using the same research, criteria, and objectivity, whether the product being reviewed is from Paula's Choice or another brand.

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05.30.2015
New formula - Measured Micrograins +

A multi-action facial scrub and mask for all skin types – including unpredictable, easily-sensitized skin – with natural spherical jojoba beads in a nutritive, toxin-removing clay-based creme. This new, next-generation Measured Micrograins formula exfoliates, controls oil, strengthens, then calms skin. It also includes known pore-refining and oil-balancing ingredients...love it.

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Anonymous
06.01.2015
Beautypedia Team Response

Hi there!  Thanks for the heads up - we'll work on getting this updated :)

—Admin
08.15.2014
tried this and like it

I pick this up after a facial at a local spa/. After I got home, I thought I should see what Paula had to say about this. To my surprise I really like it, Does a great job of exfoliating my skin leaving it soft and very smooth.

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LindaN
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