02.18.2013
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Biofirm Lift Firming Anti-wrinkle Micro-filling Cream for Eyes
Rating
15 ml for $52
Category:Skin Care > Retinol Products > Eye Moisturizers
Last Updated:02.18.2013
Jar Packaging:Yes
Tested on animals:Yes
Review Overview

Biofirm Lift Firming Anti-wrinkle Micro-filling Cream for Eyes contains mostly water, silicone, slip agent, thickeners, alcohol, absorbents, more thickener, and vitamin E. Lesser amounts of several plant oils and some antioxidants are also included, but the jar packaging won’t keep their best traits stable once the product is open. This product won’t firm skin and its caffeine content cannot reduce puffy eyes. All in all, this is a dated formula though it would still be a basic moisturizer for slightly dry skin, so it’s a little like using a washboard instead of a washing machine to clean your clothes.

Claims

This firming eye cream features expanding biopeptides to help micro-fill eye area wrinkles and caffeine to help reduce eye area puffiness. Micro-lifting action instantly gives the appearance of lifted eyelids and softened crow’s feet.

Ingredients

Water, Cyclopentasiloxane, Isononyl Isononanoate, Glycerin, Glyceryl Stearate, Butylene Glycol, Cetyl Alcohol, Alcohol Denat., Silica, Aluminum Starch Octenylsuccinate, PEG-40 Stearate, Triisononanoin, Tocopheryl Acetate, Paraffin, Polysilicone-8, Potassium Cetyl Phosphate, Glyceryl Oleate, Mica, Sorbitan Tristearate, Aluminum Hydroxide, Phenoxyethanol, Glyceryl Linolenate, Chlorphenesin, Methylparaben, Corn Oil, Apricot Kernel Oil, Passiflora Edulis Seed Oil, Rice Bran Oil, Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer, Caffeine, Yeast Extract, Hydrolyzed Rice Protein, Propylparaben, Acetyl Trifluoromethylphenyl Valylglycine, Vitreoscilla Ferment, Sodium Hydroxide, Tocopherol, Triethanolamine, Ginkgo Biloba Leaf Extract, Disodium EDTA, Methylsilanol Mannuronate, Adenosine, Glyceryl Linoleate

Brand Overview

Biotherm At-A-Glance

Strengths: Sunscreens now include the right UVA-protecting ingredients; some good cleansers and makeup removers.

Weaknesses: Redundancy, especially within the moisturizer category where there are far too many products whose differences are more tied to name and claims than formula; overuse of alcohol in the moisturizers (the drying kind, not benign fatty alcohols such as cetyl or stearyl); jar packaging; bland toners; ineffective AHA/BHA, and skin-lightening products; overly fragrant products make this brand a poor choice for those with rosacea or sensitive skin.

Biotherm is one of the many companies owned by L'Oreal USA, and has a vast array of products, with many redundancies. It was founded in 1952 by a French biologist who discovered, as the story goes, a mineral-rich element in mountain spring water. Flash-forward to a slick lab where white-coated scientists supposedly figured out a way to capture this element (called vitreoscilla ferment) in its active form, and that's essentially the story behind Biotherm, now sold in 70 countries. The company announced in 2007 that Biotherm would not be sold in any U.S. or Canadian department stores anymore yet would be sold online. But as of 2009, it seems the company changed plans, at least in terms of its Canadian distribution. The brand is sold in most Canadian department stores as well as Shoppers Drug Mart.

Biotherm's claims are wrapped around the effect their special ingredient (vitreoscilla ferment) has on skin, and how it helps skin reactivate its own natural biological processes. We weren't even partway through reviewing these products before noticing the products are far from unique or specially formulated. A major reason for that is the inclusion of problematic ingredients in many products, notably alcohol, lots of fragrance, and menthol derivatives.

But is there anything to Biotherm's fervent belief in and pervasive use of vitreoscilla ferment? This gram-negative bacteria can help cells utilize oxygen better in vitro (Source: Journal of Biotechnology, January 2001, pages 57–66). But whether that effect can be translated to benefit skin cells via a cosmetic formulation is unknown, and there are no studies supporting the use of this ingredient for skin care. Therefore, you're left to take Biotherm's word for it, even though they don't bother to explain why they avoided so many well-researched antioxidants, or use minuscule amounts of intriguing ingredients that in greater amounts can positively affect skin's structure and healthy functioning. Plus you have to wonder, if this is such a great ingredient for skin, why don't the other L'Oreal companies such as Lancome, Kiehl's, La Roche-Posay, or even L'Oreal use it?

Biotherm is also big on minerals, specifically the gluconate forms of magnesium, copper, and zinc. All of these have some research indicating their merit for skin, but mostly in terms of wound healing or being mildly antibacterial. That's not the way they're showcased in Biotherm's products, of course, because anti-wrinkle and anti-aging claims are what sell products. Although they link minerals with anti-aging prowess, a wrinkle is not a wound. Moreover, the tiny amounts of these minerals found throughout the Biotherm lineup only nullifies their already limited effectiveness as part of a comprehensive skin-care routine. There are some gems to be found in this line, but proceed with caution because most of it is downright boring or just plain bad for your skin.

Note: Biotherm is categorized as a brand that tests on animals because its products are sold in China. Although Biotherm does not conduct animal testing for their products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brands state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law." Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Paula’s Choice Research Team.

For more information about Biotherm, call (888) BIOTHERM or visit www.biotherm-usa.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia Team proudly and unequivocally maintains the commitment that Paula Begoun, founder of Beautypedia and Paula's Choice Skincare made over 30 years ago-to help you find the best products possible for your skin. We do this by relentlessly pursuing and relying on published scientific research so you will have unbiased information on what works and what doesn't-and the sneaky ways you could be making your skin worse, not better!


The Beautypedia Team reviews all products using the same research, criteria, and objectivity, whether the product being reviewed is from Paula's Choice or another brand.

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