09.02.2015
2342
Superdefense Age Defense Eye Cream Broad Spectrum SPF 20
0.5 fl. oz. for $41
Expert Rating
Community Rating (20)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:09.02.2015
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

Clinique hit a home run with this triple-threat eye cream that provides broad-spectrum sun protection, brightens the eye area (so dark circles are less apparent), and treats skin to skin-repairing and antioxidant ingredients that fight signs of aging.

Of course, the big draw (at least to us) is the gentle, mineral-based sun protection of this fragrance-free eye cream. There's basically zero risk of this stinging when applied around the eyes, and it provides light hydration that won't interfere with concealer's wear time.

This formula is best for normal to sensitive or slightly dry skin; if you have dry skin, you'll want to apply your regular moisturizer and then follow with this eye cream.

We generally maintain you don't need an eye cream, especially during the day because most of them do not contain sunscreen. This one does, and its formula is well-suited for sensitive eye-area skin.

One more comment: Unlike many of Clinique's other eye creams, this one isn't packaged in a jar! Instead, it's packaged in an opaque tube that works to keep the light- and air-sensitive ingredients stable.

Pros:
  • Provides gentle, broad-spectrum sun protection.
  • Practically zero risk of stinging around the eyes.
  • Provides light hydration without causing concealer to crease or fade.
  • Fragrance-free, and packaged to keep the light- and air-sensitive ingredients stable during use.
  • Contains a very good mix of anti-aging ingredients (beyond the mineral-based sun protection).
  • Has an attractive, non-sparkling brightening effect so dark circles look less apparent.
Cons:
  • None.
Community Reviews
Claims

We believe the best eye defense is the one you'll wear every day. You can look forward to instant brightening and comfortable protection from UVA/UVB, stress, pollution, dehydration.

Ingredients

Titanium Dioxide 5.6%, Zinc Oxide 3.8%. Water/Aqua/Eau, Isocetyl Stearoyl Stearate, C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Butylene Glycol, Cetyl Alcohol, Butyrospermum, Parkii (Shea Butter, Dimethicone, Laureth-4, Cetyl Esters, PEG-100, Stearate, Polyethylene, Rosmarinus Officinalis (Rosemary) Leaf Extract, Sea Whip Extract, Padina Pavonica Thallus Extract, Sigesbeckia Orientalis (St. Paul’s Wort) Extract, Algae Extract, Lecithin, Micrococcus Lysate, Caffeine, Astrocaryum Murumuru Seed Butter, Isohexadecane, Tocopheryl Acetate, Trehalose, Glycerin, Isostearic Acid, Caprylyl Glycol, Polyhydroxystearic Acid, Polysorbate 80, Phytosphingosine, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, Sodium RNA, Lauric Acid, Linoleic Acid, Sodium Hyaluronate, Hydrogenated Lecithin, Ascorbyl Tocopheryl Maleate, Chamomilla Recutita (Matricaria), Acrylamide/Sodium Acryloydimethyltaurate Copolymer, Hexylene Glycol, Nordihydrogualaretic Acid, Tromethamine, Aluminum Hydroxide, Disodium EDTA, Phenoxyethanol, Mica, Iron Oxides (CI 77491, CI 77492, CI 77499) [ILN38727]

Brand Overview

Clinique At-A-Glance

Strengths: A few excellent moisturizers and serums; excellent sunscreens; very good cleansers and eye makeup removers; unique mattifying products; impressive selection of foundations, good concealers; some remarkable mascaras; much-improved eyeshadows, lip colors and blush formulas.

Weaknesses: Bar soaps (which can clog pores and dull skin); alcohol-based toners; unfortunate choice of jar packaging for antioxidant-loaded moisturizers.

Estee Lauder-owned Clinique launched the concept of cosmetics being "allergy-tested," "hypoallergenic," "100% fragrance-free," and "dermatologist tested." Of those marketing claims, the only one with significance is "100% fragrance-free," which, for the most part, Clinique maintains (although it does add some fragrant extracts to a few products). Unfortunately, terms like “hypoallergenic” and “dermatologist tested” aren’t regulated by the FDA and can mean anything—thus, you still need to rely on the ingredient list to tell you whether their product contains any ingredients with the potential to irritate skin.

That inconvenient fact aside, Clinique is leading the way with cutting-edge, state-of-the-art moisturizers and serums, plus some formidable makeup and more than a few excellent sunscreens. While Clinique has some products that we see as missteps for reasons discussed in their reviews, more than ever, what they offer is quite good (just have realistic expectations, as some of their claims go beyond what their products are capable of).

Turning to makeup, Clinique continues to offer a vast palette of colors and textures, especially with their enormous selection of foundations—many of which feature effective sunscreens. Without a doubt, the numerous formulas offer something for every skin type and almost every skin color—though the blushes, eye makeup and lip colors are frequently not pigmented enough for deeper skin tones.

The bottom line is that, despite a few shortcomings, Clinique is one of the most comprehensive (and comparably affordable) department-store makeup lines, and it is completely understandable why they enjoy such broad appeal.

Note: Clinique is categorized as one that tests on animals because their products are sold in China. Although Clinique does not conduct animal testing for their products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brand’s state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law”. Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Beautypedia Team.

For more information about Clinique, call (800) 419-4041 or visit www.clinique.com

About the Experts

The new Beautypedia Team proudly and unequivocally maintains the commitment to help you find the best products possible for your skin. We do this by relentlessly pursuing and relying on published scientific research so you will have unbiased information on what works and what doesn't-and the sneaky ways you could be making your skin worse, not better!


The Beautypedia Team reviews all products using the same research, criteria, and objectivity, whether the product being reviewed is from Paula's Choice or another brand.

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Clinique At-A-Glance

Strengths: A few excellent moisturizers and serums; excellent sunscreens; very good cleansers and eye makeup removers; unique mattifying products; impressive selection of foundations, good concealers; some remarkable mascaras; much-improved eyeshadows, lip colors and blush formulas.

Weaknesses: Bar soaps (which can clog pores and dull skin); alcohol-based toners; unfortunate choice of jar packaging for antioxidant-loaded moisturizers.

Estee Lauder-owned Clinique launched the concept of cosmetics being "allergy-tested," "hypoallergenic," "100% fragrance-free," and "dermatologist tested." Of those marketing claims, the only one with significance is "100% fragrance-free," which, for the most part, Clinique maintains (although it does add some fragrant extracts to a few products). Unfortunately, terms like “hypoallergenic” and “dermatologist tested” aren’t regulated by the FDA and can mean anything—thus, you still need to rely on the ingredient list to tell you whether their product contains any ingredients with the potential to irritate skin.

That inconvenient fact aside, Clinique is leading the way with cutting-edge, state-of-the-art moisturizers and serums, plus some formidable makeup and more than a few excellent sunscreens. While Clinique has some products that we see as missteps for reasons discussed in their reviews, more than ever, what they offer is quite good (just have realistic expectations, as some of their claims go beyond what their products are capable of).

Turning to makeup, Clinique continues to offer a vast palette of colors and textures, especially with their enormous selection of foundations—many of which feature effective sunscreens. Without a doubt, the numerous formulas offer something for every skin type and almost every skin color—though the blushes, eye makeup and lip colors are frequently not pigmented enough for deeper skin tones.

The bottom line is that, despite a few shortcomings, Clinique is one of the most comprehensive (and comparably affordable) department-store makeup lines, and it is completely understandable why they enjoy such broad appeal.

Note: Clinique is categorized as one that tests on animals because their products are sold in China. Although Clinique does not conduct animal testing for their products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brand’s state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law”. Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Beautypedia Team.

For more information about Clinique, call (800) 419-4041 or visit www.clinique.com