02.26.2016
84
Redness Solutions Makeup SPF 15
1 fl. oz. for $27
Expert Rating
Community Rating (8)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:02.26.2016
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

Clinique claims that Redness Solutions Makeup SPF 15 is formulated with “probiotic technology [which] helps strengthen the barrier often compromised in redness sufferers.” That sounds intriguing, but there is no published research to support the claim that probiotics (which are strains of helpful bacteria) have any benefit when applied topically, or even that they remain stable in a skin-care or makeup formula.

Although the probiotics are most likely a bust, this foundation does contain some good anti-inflammatory ingredients that may help reduce redness. What puzzles us is why Clinique decided to include a synthetic sunscreen, octinoxate, in a foundation targeted for sensitive skin?! Mind you, octinoxate is effective and fine for the majority of people, but it carries a higher risk of irritation for those with sensitive skin. The formula would be far better for sensitive, reddened skin if they used the mineral-based actives of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide alone.

Beyond the claims, this liquid foundation offers medium coverage to help camouflage redness and blemishes. It sets to a matte finish. Among the shades, avoid Calming Fair, which has pink undertones that emphasize redness, not neutralize it; however, the other shades are flattering, neutral colors in the fair to medium range. Clinique did not create any shades for darker skin tones, perhaps because the darker your skin tone is, the less apparent redness will be.

Community Reviews
Claims
Soothing oil-free makeup instantly colour-corrects flushing, blushing. Calming ingredients help minimize flare-ups. Beneficial probiotic technology helps strengthen skin's barrier. Keeps environmental triggers at bay with SPF plus antioxidants.
Ingredients

Active: Octinoxate 5.90%, Zinc Oxide 3.70%, Titanium Dioxide 2.90% Other: Water, Methyl Trimethicone, Phenyl Trimethicone, Dimethicone, Triethylhexanoin, Butylene Glycol, Trimethylsiloxysilicate, PEG-10 Dimethicone, Lauryl PEG-9 Polydimethylsiloxyethyl Dimethicone, C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Lactobacillus Ferment, Citrus Grandis (Grapefruit) Peel Extract, Magnolia Grandiflora Bark Extract, Poria Cocos Sclerotium Extract, Astrocaryum Murumuru Seed Butter, Glycerin, Caffeine, Sodium Myristoyl Sarcosinate, Caprylyl Methicone, Methicone, Polyglyceryl-6 Polyricinoleate, Disteardimonium Hectorite, Isopropyl Titanium Triisostearate, Dimethicone Crosspolymer-3, Lecithin, Tocopheryl Acetate, Laureth-7, Dimethicone/PEG-10/15 Crosspolymer, Sodium Chloride, Dipropylene Glycol, Disodium EDTA, Aluminum Hydroxide, Polyaminopropyl Biguanide, Phenoxyethanol May Contain: Mica, Titanium Dioxide, Iron Oxides

Brand Overview

Clinique At-A-Glance

Strengths: A few excellent moisturizers and serums; excellent sunscreens; very good cleansers and eye makeup removers; unique mattifying products; impressive selection of foundations, good concealers; some remarkable mascaras; much-improved eyeshadows, lip colors and blush formulas.

Weaknesses: Bar soaps (which can clog pores and dull skin); alcohol-based toners; unfortunate choice of jar packaging for antioxidant-loaded moisturizers.

Estee Lauder-owned Clinique launched the concept of cosmetics being "allergy-tested," "hypoallergenic," "100% fragrance-free," and "dermatologist tested." Of those marketing claims, the only one with significance is "100% fragrance-free," which, for the most part, Clinique maintains (although it does add some fragrant extracts to a few products). Unfortunately, terms like “hypoallergenic” and “dermatologist tested” aren’t regulated by the FDA and can mean anything—thus, you still need to rely on the ingredient list to tell you whether their product contains any ingredients with the potential to irritate skin.

That inconvenient fact aside, Clinique is leading the way with cutting-edge, state-of-the-art moisturizers and serums, plus some formidable makeup and more than a few excellent sunscreens. While Clinique has some products that we see as missteps for reasons discussed in their reviews, more than ever, what they offer is quite good (just have realistic expectations, as some of their claims go beyond what their products are capable of).

Turning to makeup, Clinique continues to offer a vast palette of colors and textures, especially with their enormous selection of foundations—many of which feature effective sunscreens. Without a doubt, the numerous formulas offer something for every skin type and almost every skin color—though the blushes, eye makeup and lip colors are frequently not pigmented enough for deeper skin tones.

The bottom line is that, despite a few shortcomings, Clinique is one of the most comprehensive (and comparably affordable) department-store makeup lines, and it is completely understandable why they enjoy such broad appeal.

Note: Clinique is categorized as one that tests on animals because their products are sold in China. Although Clinique does not conduct animal testing for their products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brand’s state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law”. Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Beautypedia Team.

For more information about Clinique, call (800) 419-4041 or visit www.clinique.com

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Clinique At-A-Glance

Strengths: A few excellent moisturizers and serums; excellent sunscreens; very good cleansers and eye makeup removers; unique mattifying products; impressive selection of foundations, good concealers; some remarkable mascaras; much-improved eyeshadows, lip colors and blush formulas.

Weaknesses: Bar soaps (which can clog pores and dull skin); alcohol-based toners; unfortunate choice of jar packaging for antioxidant-loaded moisturizers.

Estee Lauder-owned Clinique launched the concept of cosmetics being "allergy-tested," "hypoallergenic," "100% fragrance-free," and "dermatologist tested." Of those marketing claims, the only one with significance is "100% fragrance-free," which, for the most part, Clinique maintains (although it does add some fragrant extracts to a few products). Unfortunately, terms like “hypoallergenic” and “dermatologist tested” aren’t regulated by the FDA and can mean anything—thus, you still need to rely on the ingredient list to tell you whether their product contains any ingredients with the potential to irritate skin.

That inconvenient fact aside, Clinique is leading the way with cutting-edge, state-of-the-art moisturizers and serums, plus some formidable makeup and more than a few excellent sunscreens. While Clinique has some products that we see as missteps for reasons discussed in their reviews, more than ever, what they offer is quite good (just have realistic expectations, as some of their claims go beyond what their products are capable of).

Turning to makeup, Clinique continues to offer a vast palette of colors and textures, especially with their enormous selection of foundations—many of which feature effective sunscreens. Without a doubt, the numerous formulas offer something for every skin type and almost every skin color—though the blushes, eye makeup and lip colors are frequently not pigmented enough for deeper skin tones.

The bottom line is that, despite a few shortcomings, Clinique is one of the most comprehensive (and comparably affordable) department-store makeup lines, and it is completely understandable why they enjoy such broad appeal.

Note: Clinique is categorized as one that tests on animals because their products are sold in China. Although Clinique does not conduct animal testing for their products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brand’s state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law”. Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Beautypedia Team.

For more information about Clinique, call (800) 419-4041 or visit www.clinique.com