05.18.2015
6
Repairwear Anti-Gravity™ Eye Cream
0.5 fl. oz. for $41
Expert Rating
Community Rating (2)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:05.18.2015
Jar Packaging:Yes
Tested on animals:Yes

We're disappointed that Repairwear Anti-Gravity™ Eye Cream earned only two stars, because although it can't defy gravity and lift sagging skin, it does contain an impressive roster of ingredients for dry skin around the eyes—and some of these fight signs of aging, too! The downside is that this fragrance-free eye cream is packaged in a jar. We explain why this matters in the More Info section.

Not everyone needs an eye cream (that explanation can also be found in the More Info section) but if this one was packaged differently, such as in an opaque squeeze tube or pump bottle, we would happily sing its praises. If you have dry skin around your eyes, and many of us do, a moisturizing formula like this can feel wonderful. Clinique mixed shea butter with tried-and-true emollients plus numerous plant-based antioxidants and a nice list of repairing ingredients, too.

We also want to point out that the mineral pigments of titanium dioxide and mica work to softly and temporarily brighten undereye darkness. It's not a solution for dark circles—you'll still need your concealer—but the cosmetic effect helps and hey, if you're going to apply an eye cream anyway, why not?

The creamy texture absolutely improves the look of dry skin and smoothes the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, but so do lots of other eye-area moisturizers whose packaging doesn't compromise the long term effectiveness of its light- and air-sensitive ingredients. See our list of Best Eye Moisturizers for eye creams whose ingredients and packaging combine to create a product worth your beauty dollars.

Pros:
  • Creamy, emollient formula beautifully treats dry skin around the eyes.
  • Gentle, fragrance-free formula.
  • Contains an impressive mix of antioxidant and repairing ingredients.
  • Can brighten undereye darkness thanks to the mineral pigments it contains.
Cons:
  • Jar packaging means many of this eye cream's best ingredients won't remain stable during use.
  • Cannot lift sagging skin; this benefit is beyond the possibility of skincare products.
More Info:

Jar Packaging: The fact that it's packaged in a jar means the beneficial ingredients won't remain stable once it is opened. All plant extracts, almost all vitamins, antioxidants, and other state-of-the-art ingredients break down in the presence of air. Therefore, once a jar is opened and lets the air in, these important ingredients begin to deteriorate. Jars also are unsanitary because you're dipping your fingers into them with each use, adding bacteria that further deteriorate the beneficial ingredients.

The vast majority of ingredients that are most beneficial for your skin are not stable in the presence of light and air, which is exactly what happens when you take the lid off a jar (Pharmacology Review, 2013 & Journal of Biophotonics, 2010).

One of the critical factors in any anti-aging or skin-healing formula is the amount and variety of antioxidants, cell-communicating ingredients, and skin-repairing ingredients, and the more the better. These function in a variety of ways to reduce the effects of the constant environmental stresses your skin experiences (Dermatology Research and Practice, 2012 & The Journal of Pathology, 2007).

Once you open that jar you bought, you immediately compromise the stability of the anti-aging superstars it contains. (You can visualize their benefits disappearing like puffs of air each time you open up that lid!)

Why You May Not Need an Eye Cream: There is much you can do to improve signs of aging around your eyes, but this doesn't have to include using an eye-area product. Any product loaded with antioxidants, emollients, skin-repairing and anti-inflammatory ingredients will work wonders when used around the eye area. Those ingredients don't have to come from a product labeled as an eye cream or gel or serum or balm—they can come from any well-formulated moisturizer or serum.

Most eye-area products aren't necessary because so many are poorly formulated, contain nothing special for the eye area, or come in packaging that won't keep key ingredients stable. Just because the product is labeled as a special eye-area treatment doesn't mean it's good for the eye area or any part of the face; in fact, many can actually make matters worse.

You would be shocked how many eye-area products lack even the most basic ingredients to help skin. For example, most eye-area products don't contain sunscreen. During the day, that is a serious problem if you aren't wearing it under a broad-spectrum sunscreen rated SPF 30+ as it leaves the skin around your eyes vulnerable to sun damage—and that absolutely will make dark circles, puffiness, and wrinkles worse. Of course, for nighttime use, eye-area products without sun protection are just fine.

Whatever product you put around your eye area, regardless of what it is labeled, must be well formulated and appropriate for the skin type you have around your eyes. You may prefer using a specially labelled eye cream, but you may also do just as well applying your regular facial moisturizer and/or serum around your eyes.

Community Reviews
Claims
Densely hydrating cream helps lift up, firm up around the eyes. Helps erase the look of fine lines and builds cushion into time-thinned skin. Even the first application creates a cushiony feel and a brighter look. That’s just the beginning.
Ingredients
Water\Aqua\Eau, Butryospermum Parkii (Shea Butter), Cetearyl Alcohol, Butylene Glycol, Hydrogenated Polyisobutene, Phenyl Trimethicone, Polyglyceryl-3 Beeswax, Polybutene, Sucrose, Polymethyl Methacrylate, Cetyl Esters, Isostearyl Neopentonate, Glycerin, Cetearyl Glucoside, Whey Protein\Lactis Protein\Proteiine Du Petit-Lait, Siges-Beckia Orientalis (St. Paul’s Wort) Extract, Camellia Sinensis (Green Tea) Leaf Extract, Hordeum Vulgare (Barley) Extract\Extrait D’Orge, Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract\Faex\Extrait De Levure, Linoleic Acid, Cholesterol, Caffeine, Palmitoyl Oligopeptide, Squalane, Phytosphingosine, Sodium Hyaluronate, Dimethicone, Caprylyl Glycol, PEG-8, Methyl Glucose Sesquistearate, Polysilicone-11, Glyceryl Polymethacrylate, PEF-100 Stearate, Tocopheryl Acetate, Stearic Acid, 1,2-Hexanediol, Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer, Sodium Dehydroacetate, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, Aminomethyl Propanol, Potassium Sulfate, Phenoxyethanol, Disodium EDTA, Titanium Dioxide (CI 77891), Mica.
Brand Overview

Clinique At-A-Glance

Strengths: A few excellent moisturizers and serums; excellent sunscreens; very good cleansers and eye makeup removers; unique mattifying products; impressive selection of foundations, good concealers; some remarkable mascaras; much-improved eyeshadows, lip colors and blush formulas.

Weaknesses: Bar soaps (which can clog pores and dull skin); alcohol-based toners; unfortunate choice of jar packaging for antioxidant-loaded moisturizers.

Estee Lauder-owned Clinique launched the concept of cosmetics being "allergy-tested," "hypoallergenic," "100% fragrance-free," and "dermatologist tested." Of those marketing claims, the only one with significance is "100% fragrance-free," which, for the most part, Clinique maintains (although it does add some fragrant extracts to a few products). Unfortunately, terms like “hypoallergenic” and “dermatologist tested” aren’t regulated by the FDA and can mean anything—thus, you still need to rely on the ingredient list to tell you whether their product contains any ingredients with the potential to irritate skin.

That inconvenient fact aside, Clinique is leading the way with cutting-edge, state-of-the-art moisturizers and serums, plus some formidable makeup and more than a few excellent sunscreens. While Clinique has some products that we see as missteps for reasons discussed in their reviews, more than ever, what they offer is quite good (just have realistic expectations, as some of their claims go beyond what their products are capable of).

Turning to makeup, Clinique continues to offer a vast palette of colors and textures, especially with their enormous selection of foundations—many of which feature effective sunscreens. Without a doubt, the numerous formulas offer something for every skin type and almost every skin color—though the blushes, eye makeup and lip colors are frequently not pigmented enough for deeper skin tones.

The bottom line is that, despite a few shortcomings, Clinique is one of the most comprehensive (and comparably affordable) department-store makeup lines, and it is completely understandable why they enjoy such broad appeal.

Note: Clinique is categorized as one that tests on animals because their products are sold in China. Although Clinique does not conduct animal testing for their products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brand’s state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law”. Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Beautypedia Team.

For more information about Clinique, call (800) 419-4041 or visit www.clinique.com

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Clinique At-A-Glance

Strengths: A few excellent moisturizers and serums; excellent sunscreens; very good cleansers and eye makeup removers; unique mattifying products; impressive selection of foundations, good concealers; some remarkable mascaras; much-improved eyeshadows, lip colors and blush formulas.

Weaknesses: Bar soaps (which can clog pores and dull skin); alcohol-based toners; unfortunate choice of jar packaging for antioxidant-loaded moisturizers.

Estee Lauder-owned Clinique launched the concept of cosmetics being "allergy-tested," "hypoallergenic," "100% fragrance-free," and "dermatologist tested." Of those marketing claims, the only one with significance is "100% fragrance-free," which, for the most part, Clinique maintains (although it does add some fragrant extracts to a few products). Unfortunately, terms like “hypoallergenic” and “dermatologist tested” aren’t regulated by the FDA and can mean anything—thus, you still need to rely on the ingredient list to tell you whether their product contains any ingredients with the potential to irritate skin.

That inconvenient fact aside, Clinique is leading the way with cutting-edge, state-of-the-art moisturizers and serums, plus some formidable makeup and more than a few excellent sunscreens. While Clinique has some products that we see as missteps for reasons discussed in their reviews, more than ever, what they offer is quite good (just have realistic expectations, as some of their claims go beyond what their products are capable of).

Turning to makeup, Clinique continues to offer a vast palette of colors and textures, especially with their enormous selection of foundations—many of which feature effective sunscreens. Without a doubt, the numerous formulas offer something for every skin type and almost every skin color—though the blushes, eye makeup and lip colors are frequently not pigmented enough for deeper skin tones.

The bottom line is that, despite a few shortcomings, Clinique is one of the most comprehensive (and comparably affordable) department-store makeup lines, and it is completely understandable why they enjoy such broad appeal.

Note: Clinique is categorized as one that tests on animals because their products are sold in China. Although Clinique does not conduct animal testing for their products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brand’s state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law”. Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Beautypedia Team.

For more information about Clinique, call (800) 419-4041 or visit www.clinique.com