Repairwear Laser Focus Wrinkle Correcting Eye Cream
0.5 fl. oz. for $43
Last Updated:12.02.2014
Jar Packaging:Yes
Tested on animals:Yes
Review Overview

Clinique didn't need another eye cream (and in fact most eye creams aren't necessary at all—see More Info to find out why) and despite the "laser focus" portion of the name, this isn't laser-like or more advanced than lots of other eye creams. If anything, this is less impressive than we were expecting. It's mostly water with an emollient, slip agents, thickeners, and Clinique's usual assortment of cell-communicating, skin-repairing, and antioxidants ingredients. The latter trio is essential for anti-aging benefits, so why the average rating? One word: Packaging.

Because this eye cream is packaged in a jar, as soon as you open it (and with every use thereafter) the key ingredients are compromised because they cannot withstand routine exposure to light and air (see More Info for details). Clinique promises a younger look in 12 weeks, but the moisturizing ingredients in this eye cream will soften wrinkles instantly. If that sounds impressive you should know it's true for any moisturizer—this formula doesn't contain a single ingredient that's unique for the eye area, one of the chief reasons eye creams are a waste of time.

If you decide to try this eye cream it's best for normal to dry skin, but don't expect results anything like laser resurfacing around eyes (which can, to a major extent, eliminate wrinkles and help tighten skin). Clinique isn't making that claim directly, but the name certainly implies an association with laser treatments a cosmetic dermatologist offers.

Note: This eye cream contains fragrance in the form of rosemary leaf extract.

  • Creamy formula moisturizes dry skin anywhere on the face.
  • As with any moisturizing formula, helps improve appearance of wrinkles.
  • Contains a good blend of anti-aging ingredients (though none of them are special for the eye area).
  • Expensive.
  • Nothing laser-like about this eye cream!
  • Jar packaging hinders the effectiveness of key ingredients.
More Info:

Most eye creams aren't necessary. That's either because they are poorly formulated, contain nothing special for the eye area, or come in packaging that won't keep key ingredients stable. Just because the product is labeled as an eye cream doesn't mean it's good for your eye area; in fact, many can actually make matters worse.

There is much you can do to improve signs of aging around your eyes. Any product loaded with antioxidants, skin-repairing ingredients, skin-lightening ingredients, anti-inflammatory ingredients, and effective emollients will work wonders and those ingredients don't have to come from a product labeled as an eye cream.

You would be shocked how many eye creams lack even the most basic ingredients to help skin. For example, most eye creams don't contain sunscreen. During the day that is a serious problem because it leaves the skin around your eyes vulnerable to sun damage and this absolutely will make dark circles, puffiness, and wrinkles worse!

Whatever product you put around your eye area, regardless of what it is labeled, must be well formulated and appropriate for the skin type around your eyes! That may mean you need an eye cream, but you may also do just as well applying your regular facial moisturizer around your eyes.

The fact that it's packaged in a jar means the beneficial ingredients won't remain stable once it is opened. All plant extracts, vitamins, antioxidants, and other state-of-the-art ingredients break down in the presence of air, so once a jar is opened and lets the air in these important ingredients begin to deteriorate. Jars also are unsanitary because you're dipping your fingers into them with each use, adding bacteria which further deteriorate the beneficial ingredients (Sources: Free Radical Biology and Medicine, September 2007, pages 818-829; Ageing Research Reviews, December 2007, pages 271-288; Dermatologic Therapy, September-October 2007, pages 314-321; International Journal of Pharmaceutics, June 12, 2005, pages 197-203; Pharmaceutical Development and Technology, January 2002, pages 1-32; International Society for Horticultural Science, www.actahort.org/members/showpdf?booknrarnr=778_5; Beautypackaging.com, and www.beautypackaging.com/articles/2007/03/airless-packaging.php).


The beauty of a second chance. Now for eyes, a three-dimensional improvement that visibly smoothes lines and plumps and refines the entire eye area with noticeable results in four weeks. Keep smiling, you'll see a 54% younger look in 12 weeks. Another chance to forgive.


Water, Squalane, Butylene Glycol, Ethylhexyl Palmate, Glycerin, Caprylic/Capripc/Myristic/Stearic Triglyceride, Dimethicone, Methyl Gluceth-20, PEG-100 Stearate, Cetyl Alcohol, Glyceryl Stearate, PEG-8, Polymethylsilesquioxane, Hydrogenated Lecithin, Hypnea Musciformis (Algae) Extract, Gellidiela Acerosa (Algae) Extract, Sigesbeckia Orientalis (St. John’s Wort) Extract, Crithmum Maritimum Extract, Hordeum Vulgare (Barley) Extract, Cholorella Vulgaris Extract, Cucumis Sativus (Cucumber) Fruit Extract, Rosemary Leaf Extract, Padina Pavonia Thallus Extract, Laminaria Digitata Extract, Camellia Sinensis Leaf Extract, Saccharomycopsis Ferment Filtrate, Whey Protein, Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil, Micrococcus Lysate, Persea Gratissima (Avocado) Sterols, Ergothioneine, Biotin, Acetyl Glucosamine, Caffeine, Lecithin, Palmitoyl Oligopeptide, Glyceryl Polymethacrylate, Caprylic/ Capric caprylic Triglyceride, Polysilicone-11, Propylene Glycol Dicaprylate, Tocopheryl Acetate, Sucrose, Trehalose, Pentylene Glycol, Carbomer, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seedcake, Tromethamine, Phytosphingosine, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, Cholesterol, Zinc PCA, Hexylene Glycol, Hydroxyethylcellulose, Sodium Hyaluronate, Potassium Sulfate, Citric Acid, Caprylyl Glycol, Sodium Citrate, Disodium Distyrylbiphenyl Disulfonate, Disodium EDTA, Phenoxyethanol, Titanium Dioxide

Brand Overview

Clinique At-A-Glance

Strengths: A few excellent moisturizers and serums; excellent sunscreens; very good cleansers and eye makeup removers; unique mattifying products; impressive selection of foundations, good concealers; some remarkable mascaras; much-improved eyeshadows, lip colors and blush formulas.

Weaknesses: Bar soaps (which can clog pores and dull skin); alcohol-based toners; unfortunate choice of jar packaging for antioxidant-loaded moisturizers.

Estee Lauder-owned Clinique launched the concept of cosmetics being "allergy-tested," "hypoallergenic," "100% fragrance-free," and "dermatologist tested." Of those marketing claims, the only one with significance is "100% fragrance-free," which, for the most part, Clinique maintains (although it does add some fragrant extracts to a few products). Unfortunately, terms like “hypoallergenic” and “dermatologist tested” aren’t regulated by the FDA and can mean anything—thus, you still need to rely on the ingredient list to tell you whether their product contains any ingredients with the potential to irritate skin.

That inconvenient fact aside, Clinique is leading the way with cutting-edge, state-of-the-art moisturizers and serums, plus some formidable makeup and more than a few excellent sunscreens. While Clinique has some products that we see as missteps for reasons discussed in their reviews, more than ever, what they offer is quite good (just have realistic expectations, as some of their claims go beyond what their products are capable of).

Turning to makeup, Clinique continues to offer a vast palette of colors and textures, especially with their enormous selection of foundations—many of which feature effective sunscreens. Without a doubt, the numerous formulas offer something for every skin type and almost every skin color—though the blushes, eye makeup and lip colors are frequently not pigmented enough for deeper skin tones.

The bottom line is that, despite a few shortcomings, Clinique is one of the most comprehensive (and comparably affordable) department-store makeup lines, and it is completely understandable why they enjoy such broad appeal.

Note: Clinique is categorized as one that tests on animals because their products are sold in China. Although Clinique does not conduct animal testing for their products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brand’s state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law”. Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Beautypedia Team.

For more information about Clinique, call (800) 419-4041 or visit www.clinique.com

About the Experts

The new Beautypedia Team proudly and unequivocally maintains the commitment to help you find the best products possible for your skin. We do this by relentlessly pursuing and relying on published scientific research so you will have unbiased information on what works and what doesn't-and the sneaky ways you could be making your skin worse, not better!

The Beautypedia Team reviews all products using the same research, criteria, and objectivity, whether the product being reviewed is from Paula's Choice or another brand.

Member Comments
Summary of Member Comments
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teerrible product

Terrible product- burnt red dry puffy more wrinkly

Reviewed by
Patti S
Repairwear Laser Focus

worse cream ever. when I used this cream at night time and I was happy but in the morning my eyes were swollen and looked horrible, irritated with some small sport. it's been five days and I'm taking cetirizine but nothing working. No recommendation at all:(

Reviewed by

When I use this product as part of my nightly routine my under eye lines look even worse int he morning! I'm not sure why but my under eye skin looks wrinkled and tired after using this product.

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