06.11.2015
7
Turnaround™ Revitalizing Instant Facial
2.5 fl. oz. for $38
Expert Rating
Community Rating (2)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:06.11.2015
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

This "instant facial" in a bottle may sound appealing, but it isn't nearly as revolutionary as it's made out to be. Turnaround™ Revitalizing Instant Facial is a water- and silicone-based exfoliating mask that contains diatomaceous earth (ground-up porous rock composed of the skeletons of sea creatures) to manually scrub skin. While that may sound fancy, it essentially ends up being an expensive face scrub that imparts has a hint of sparkle (we'll get to that in a moment) and can be rough on skin—we certainly wouldn't recommend this for those with sensitive skin or rosacea.

Per the directions, you're instructed to apply Turnaround™ Revitalizing Instant Facial in a thick layer as a mask (avoiding the eye area), then wait five minutes. At that point, you're to massage this scrub over skin and then rinse. Truth be told, you get the same results whether you leave this on skin for five minutes or rinse it off immediately, so there's really no reason wait.

The silicones in this mask help to slightly buffer skin from the abrasive scrubbing action of the diatomaceous earth granules, but you still need to use a light hand or else you can end up irritating skin via the gritty particles.

The fragrance-free formula also features salicylic acid, but the pH is too high for it to function as an exfoliant. Clinique included some beneficial antioxidants—anti-irritants, and cell-communicating ingredients—but in a product like this, where they are rinsed down the drain in a matter of minutes, they're not of much help for skin.

Turnaround™ Revitalizing Instant Facial does, however, live up to its claim to deliver radiance… in the form of finely milled sparkles left on skin. Whether that makes this mask any more desirable is a matter of aesthetical preference, but it's at least done in a tasteful (not overtly glittery) way.

As you may have guessed by now, five minutes with this scrub is not the equivalent of a professional facial, and in fact, it can leave skin worse for the wear if massaged into skin too aggressively. We'd recommend skipping this in lieu of masks that pamper skin in an effective and gentle way. Check out our Best Facial Masks list to find those. For those seeking a gentle exfoliant that can truly make a long-term difference in the health and texture of skin, consider trying a BHA exfoliant instead.

Pros:
  • Fragrance-free.
  • Delivers on radiance claim via a sparkly finish on skin.
Cons:
  • Essentially turns out to be a pricey face scrub.
  • No extra benefits to be gained from leaving this on skin for five minutes.
  • Abrasiveness of the scrubbing particles can irritate skin if you don't use a light hand.
Community Reviews
Claims
High-performance facial delivers radiance and smoothness in a gentle way. Revs up cell turnover to reveal skin that's fresher, more vibrant—instantly. Oil-free. For all Skin Types.
Ingredients
Water, Dimethicone/Vinyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Dimethicone, Diatomaceous Earth, Butylene Glycol, Methyl Trimethicone, Acetyl Glucosamine, C12-14 Pareth-12, Ammonium Acryloyldimethyltaurate/VP Copolymer, Glycerin, Salicylic Acid, Chestnut Seed Extract, Laminaria Saccharina Extract, Clary Extract, Polygonum Cuspidatum Root Extract, Rice Bran Extract, Creatine, Arginine, Ethylhexylglycerin, Caffeine, Allyl Methacrylates Crosspolymer, Yeast Extract/FAEX/Extrait De Levure, Pentaerythrityl Tetra-Di-T-Butyl Hydroxyhydrocinnamate, Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose, Alumina, Sodium Hydroxide, Di-C12-18 Alkyl Dimonium Disodium EDTA, Phenoxyethanol, Chlorophenesin, Ext. Violet 2, Titanium Dioxide, Blue 1
Brand Overview

Clinique At-A-Glance

Strengths: A few excellent moisturizers and serums; excellent sunscreens; very good cleansers and eye makeup removers; unique mattifying products; impressive selection of foundations, good concealers; some remarkable mascaras; much-improved eyeshadows, lip colors and blush formulas.

Weaknesses: Bar soaps (which can clog pores and dull skin); alcohol-based toners; unfortunate choice of jar packaging for antioxidant-loaded moisturizers.

Estee Lauder-owned Clinique launched the concept of cosmetics being "allergy-tested," "hypoallergenic," "100% fragrance-free," and "dermatologist tested." Of those marketing claims, the only one with significance is "100% fragrance-free," which, for the most part, Clinique maintains (although it does add some fragrant extracts to a few products). Unfortunately, terms like “hypoallergenic” and “dermatologist tested” aren’t regulated by the FDA and can mean anything—thus, you still need to rely on the ingredient list to tell you whether their product contains any ingredients with the potential to irritate skin.

That inconvenient fact aside, Clinique is leading the way with cutting-edge, state-of-the-art moisturizers and serums, plus some formidable makeup and more than a few excellent sunscreens. While Clinique has some products that we see as missteps for reasons discussed in their reviews, more than ever, what they offer is quite good (just have realistic expectations, as some of their claims go beyond what their products are capable of).

Turning to makeup, Clinique continues to offer a vast palette of colors and textures, especially with their enormous selection of foundations—many of which feature effective sunscreens. Without a doubt, the numerous formulas offer something for every skin type and almost every skin color—though the blushes, eye makeup and lip colors are frequently not pigmented enough for deeper skin tones.

The bottom line is that, despite a few shortcomings, Clinique is one of the most comprehensive (and comparably affordable) department-store makeup lines, and it is completely understandable why they enjoy such broad appeal.

Note: Clinique is categorized as one that tests on animals because their products are sold in China. Although Clinique does not conduct animal testing for their products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brand’s state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law”. Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Beautypedia Team.

For more information about Clinique, call (800) 419-4041 or visit www.clinique.com

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

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Clinique At-A-Glance

Strengths: A few excellent moisturizers and serums; excellent sunscreens; very good cleansers and eye makeup removers; unique mattifying products; impressive selection of foundations, good concealers; some remarkable mascaras; much-improved eyeshadows, lip colors and blush formulas.

Weaknesses: Bar soaps (which can clog pores and dull skin); alcohol-based toners; unfortunate choice of jar packaging for antioxidant-loaded moisturizers.

Estee Lauder-owned Clinique launched the concept of cosmetics being "allergy-tested," "hypoallergenic," "100% fragrance-free," and "dermatologist tested." Of those marketing claims, the only one with significance is "100% fragrance-free," which, for the most part, Clinique maintains (although it does add some fragrant extracts to a few products). Unfortunately, terms like “hypoallergenic” and “dermatologist tested” aren’t regulated by the FDA and can mean anything—thus, you still need to rely on the ingredient list to tell you whether their product contains any ingredients with the potential to irritate skin.

That inconvenient fact aside, Clinique is leading the way with cutting-edge, state-of-the-art moisturizers and serums, plus some formidable makeup and more than a few excellent sunscreens. While Clinique has some products that we see as missteps for reasons discussed in their reviews, more than ever, what they offer is quite good (just have realistic expectations, as some of their claims go beyond what their products are capable of).

Turning to makeup, Clinique continues to offer a vast palette of colors and textures, especially with their enormous selection of foundations—many of which feature effective sunscreens. Without a doubt, the numerous formulas offer something for every skin type and almost every skin color—though the blushes, eye makeup and lip colors are frequently not pigmented enough for deeper skin tones.

The bottom line is that, despite a few shortcomings, Clinique is one of the most comprehensive (and comparably affordable) department-store makeup lines, and it is completely understandable why they enjoy such broad appeal.

Note: Clinique is categorized as one that tests on animals because their products are sold in China. Although Clinique does not conduct animal testing for their products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brand’s state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law”. Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Beautypedia Team.

For more information about Clinique, call (800) 419-4041 or visit www.clinique.com