03.28.2014
0
DDF - Doctor's Dermatologic Formula
Protect and Correct UV Moisturizer SPF 15
Rating
1.7 fl. oz. for $67
Category:Skin Care > Moisturizers (Daytime and Nighttime) > Moisturizer with Sunscreen
Last Updated:03.28.2014
Jar Packaging:False
pH:
Tested on animals:Yes
Overview

This in-part avobenzone sunscreen makes claims similar to those of Olay’s dwindling Definity brand, and the formulation isn’t that much different either. That’s not surprising given that Olay owner Procter & Gamble is at the helm of DDF, too. Of course, because DDF is a “dermatologist-developed” line sold in upscale stores, the price point is much higher than that of Olay. But the good news is you’re getting a well-formulated daytime moisturizer that is suitable for normal to dry skin.

The amount of niacinamide along with acetyl glucosamine will likely have a positive impact on skin discolorations, and the formula does include several antioxidants (though only a couple are present in meaningful amounts). The amount of mica in this moisturizer with sunscreen leaves a soft shimmer on skin that, to some extent, can indeed make it look “translucent,” but you can get that result from any cosmetic that contains soft shine ingredients. On balance, this is a nicely formulated, though overpriced, daytime moisturizer with sunscreen.

Claims

Reclaim the natural radiance of even-toned, youthful skin while helping to prevent future discoloration with DDF Protect and Correct UV Moisturizer SPF 15. This facial moisturizer contains a potent micro-radiance complex that diminishes the look of discoloration for translucent, healthy-looking skin. It also contains SPF 15 to help protect from UVA/UVB damage and future hyperpigmentation.

Ingredients

Active: Avobenzone (3%), Octisalate(5%), Octocrylene (2.6%), Homosalate (3%), Other: Water, Glycerin, Niacinamide, Polyethylene, Acetyl Glucosamine, Polymethylsilsesquioxane, Dimethicone, Dimethiconol, Sodium Acrylate/Sodium Acryloyldimethyl Taurate Copolymer, Isohexadecane, Polysorbate 80, Pentylene Glycol, Panthenol, Mica, Titanium Dioxide, Benzyl Alcohol, Stearyl Alcohol, Behenyl Alcohol, Allantoin, Cetyl Alcohol, Methylparaben, Tocopherol, Ethylparaben, PEG-100 Stearate, Cetearyl Alcohol, Butylene Glycol, Euterpe Oleracea Fruit Extract, Tocopheryl Acteate, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Macadamia Ternifolia Seed Oil, Retinyl Palmitate, Corn Oil, Beta-Carotene, Sunflower Seed Oil, Ubiquinone, Palmitic Acid, Thoatic Acid, Disodium EDTA, Propylparaben, Undecylenoyl Phenylalanine, Iodopropynyl Butylcarbamate, Stearic Acid, Mannitol, Glutamine, Aminopropyl Ascorbyl Phosphate, Propyl Gallate, Ascorbic Acid, Camellia Sinensis Leaf Extract, Pyridoxine Hcl, Cyanocobalamin, Spirulina Platensis Extract, Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Licorice) Root Extract

Brand Overview

DDF At-A-Glance

Strengths: Several good water-soluble cleansers; excellent Photo-Age sunscreens and every DDF sunscreen includes sufficient UVA-protecting ingredients; some truly state-of-the-art moisturizers and serums; a few good AHA and skin-lightening options; a good benzoyl peroxide topical disinfectant.

Weaknesses: Expensive; products designed for sensitive skin tend to contain one or more known problematic ingredients; several irritating products based on alcohol, menthol, or problematic plant extracts; more than a handful of average moisturizers, many in jar packaging.

This skin-care company's Web site has it right with the statement that "before the beauty world discovered dermatologic skincare brands, there was DDF." Launched in 1991, well before it became common practice for "known" dermatologists to create their own skin-care lines, pioneering dermatologist Dr. Howard Sobel began and is still behind this brand. This is a long-standing line that has the backing of a dermatologist (and later that of nutritional consultant Elaine Linker), so you would expect DDF to be just what the doctor ordered. In some respects, it is. However, more often than not, products from dermatologists are just as prone to outlandish claims, exorbitant prices, and use of unproven ingredients as products from any other cosmetics line. A founder's medical background isn't a guarantee that every product he or she creates will do exactly what it claims or even be sensibly formulated. In that sense, DDF falters more than it succeeds. Sobel's credibility for creating treatment-based skin-care products is diminished when inappropriate ingredients (alcohol, menthol, and others) are included in products positioned as prestige products with a medicinal slant. Still, there are some very impressive options available (particularly in the moisturizer and serum categories) that, price notwithstanding, are worthy of consideration.

It will be curious to see what the future holds for this line, as its ownership has recently changed hands. Consumer product giant Procter & Gamble bought DDF in 2007 to expand the line's global reach, but has since sold it to UK-based Designer Parfums. Designer Parfums says it intends to bring Dr. Sobel on board to play a larger role in the company's marketing and development of both current and future products. Sobel himself says he looks forward to "Playing an active role in rebuilding this brand." (Source: www.wwd.com) We'll have to see exactly what that means as DDF moves ahead!

For more information about DDF, call 1-800-818-9770 or visit www.ddfskincare.com/.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia Research Team is dedicated to helping you find the absolute best products for your skin, using research-based criteria to review beauty products from an honest, balanced perspective. Each member of the team was personally trained by Paula Begoun herself.

Member Comments

No members have written a review yet. Be the first!

WRITE A COMMENT
Enter a title for your review
 
First Name, Last Initial
Optional
Email Address
 
How would you rate this product on the following:
Results
Value
Recommend
     
     
     
Review
500 characters left
 
SUBMIT
CANCEL

Terms of Use

585623-IIS1 v1.0.0.369 3/2/2015 10:52:46 PM