01.04.2017
2
Expert Rating
Community Rating (0)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:01.04.2017
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

Salicylic Wash is a standard, water-soluble cleanser for normal to oily skin, but it fails to live up to its claim to exfoliate skin.

Here’s the problem: Although salicylic acid can work beautifully to gently exfoliate skin when used in a leave-on product, it is far less effective for exfoliation, if at all, in a cleanser. That’s because it is rinsed off before it can begin to work.

Even if you left this cleanser on skin for a longer period of time so the salicylic acid could absorb, you’d be trading one problem for another because the cleansing agents would also be left on too, causing dryness and irritation.

Because DDF is making exfoliation claims for this cleanser that aren’t likely to occur, its rating is not as good as it would have been. For cleansing alone, Salicylic Wash is a good, fragrance-free option, although there are certainly less expensive ways to achieve this.

See our Best Cleansers list for more budget-friendly alternatives, and for exfoliation, check out our top-rated BHA Exfoliants

Pros:
  • Efficiently cleanses normal to oily skin.
  • Fragrance free.
Cons:
  • Salicylic acid is far less effective for exfoliation, if at all, in a cleanser.
  • Needlessly pricey.
Community Reviews
Claims

Salicylic Acid has effective exfoliating effects as well as the ability to combat excess oil.

Ingredients

Active: Salicylic Acid (2%), Other: Water, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Cocamide MEA, Cocamidopropyl Betaine, Propylene Glycol, Panthenol, Lauric Acid, Allantoin, Sodium Chloride, Methylparaben, Disodium EDTA, Phenoxyethanol, DMDM Hydantoin, Propylparaben, Sodium Hydroxide, Benzyl Alcohol, Sodium Benzoate, Tetrasodium EDTA

Brand Overview

DDF At-A-Glance

Strengths: Several good water-soluble cleansers; excellent Photo-Age sunscreens and every DDF sunscreen includes sufficient UVA-protecting ingredients; some truly state-of-the-art moisturizers and serums; a few good AHA and skin-lightening options; a good benzoyl peroxide topical disinfectant.

Weaknesses: Expensive; products designed for sensitive skin tend to contain one or more known problematic ingredients; several irritating products based on alcohol, menthol, or problematic plant extracts; more than a handful of average moisturizers, many in jar packaging.

This skin-care company's Web site has it right with the statement that "before the beauty world discovered dermatologic skincare brands, there was DDF." Launched in 1991, well before it became common practice for "known" dermatologists to create their own skin-care lines, pioneering dermatologist Dr. Howard Sobel began and is still behind this brand. This is a long-standing line that has the backing of a dermatologist (and later that of nutritional consultant Elaine Linker), so you would expect DDF to be just what the doctor ordered. In some respects, it is. However, more often than not, products from dermatologists are just as prone to outlandish claims, exorbitant prices, and use of unproven ingredients as products from any other cosmetics line. A founder's medical background isn't a guarantee that every product he or she creates will do exactly what it claims or even be sensibly formulated. In that sense, DDF falters more than it succeeds. Sobel's credibility for creating treatment-based skin-care products is diminished when inappropriate ingredients (alcohol, menthol, and others) are included in products positioned as prestige products with a medicinal slant. Still, there are some very impressive options available (particularly in the moisturizer and serum categories) that, price notwithstanding, are worthy of consideration.

It will be curious to see what the future holds for this line, as its ownership has recently changed hands. Consumer product giant Procter & Gamble bought DDF in 2007 to expand the line's global reach, but has since sold it to UK-based Designer Parfums. Designer Parfums says it intends to bring Dr. Sobel on board to play a larger role in the company's marketing and development of both current and future products. Sobel himself says he looks forward to "Playing an active role in rebuilding this brand." (Source: www.wwd.com) We'll have to see exactly what that means as DDF moves ahead!

For more information about DDF, call 1-800-818-9770 or visit www.ddfskincare.com/.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

DDF At-A-Glance

Strengths: Several good water-soluble cleansers; excellent Photo-Age sunscreens and every DDF sunscreen includes sufficient UVA-protecting ingredients; some truly state-of-the-art moisturizers and serums; a few good AHA and skin-lightening options; a good benzoyl peroxide topical disinfectant.

Weaknesses: Expensive; products designed for sensitive skin tend to contain one or more known problematic ingredients; several irritating products based on alcohol, menthol, or problematic plant extracts; more than a handful of average moisturizers, many in jar packaging.

This skin-care company's Web site has it right with the statement that "before the beauty world discovered dermatologic skincare brands, there was DDF." Launched in 1991, well before it became common practice for "known" dermatologists to create their own skin-care lines, pioneering dermatologist Dr. Howard Sobel began and is still behind this brand. This is a long-standing line that has the backing of a dermatologist (and later that of nutritional consultant Elaine Linker), so you would expect DDF to be just what the doctor ordered. In some respects, it is. However, more often than not, products from dermatologists are just as prone to outlandish claims, exorbitant prices, and use of unproven ingredients as products from any other cosmetics line. A founder's medical background isn't a guarantee that every product he or she creates will do exactly what it claims or even be sensibly formulated. In that sense, DDF falters more than it succeeds. Sobel's credibility for creating treatment-based skin-care products is diminished when inappropriate ingredients (alcohol, menthol, and others) are included in products positioned as prestige products with a medicinal slant. Still, there are some very impressive options available (particularly in the moisturizer and serum categories) that, price notwithstanding, are worthy of consideration.

It will be curious to see what the future holds for this line, as its ownership has recently changed hands. Consumer product giant Procter & Gamble bought DDF in 2007 to expand the line's global reach, but has since sold it to UK-based Designer Parfums. Designer Parfums says it intends to bring Dr. Sobel on board to play a larger role in the company's marketing and development of both current and future products. Sobel himself says he looks forward to "Playing an active role in rebuilding this brand." (Source: www.wwd.com) We'll have to see exactly what that means as DDF moves ahead!

For more information about DDF, call 1-800-818-9770 or visit www.ddfskincare.com/.