09.20.2012
0
Expression De L’Age Smoothing Roll-On
$57
Expert Rating
Community Rating (0)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:09.20.2012
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:No

This tiny tube is outfitted with a roller applicator composed of tiny beads which dispense the gel-like product inside. The formula is said to smooth expression lines and "is inspired by massage techniques," but regardless of the technique, wrinkles (especially the deep ones) cannot be massaged away! If anything, depending on how much pressure you use, massaging wrinkled skin can lead to further breakdown of its supportive substances, collagen and elastin.

Although Decleor maintains the effects of this roll-on are from "plant active ingredients," the smoothing properties come from the high amount of film-forming agents (think hairspray for the face) this contains. The vegetable oil can be helpful for dry skin, but the fragrant plant oils this contains are known irritants, and definitely not anti-aging or anti-wrinkle (see More Info for details).

At most, this will temporarily smooth expression lines, but its irritating ingredients are a problem for use on skin, especially around the eyes (one of the areas Decleor recommends applying this). For less money and better formulas, check out our list of the Best Specialty Products, which features our top recommendations for wrinkle fillers.

Pros:
  • Makes wrinkles look smoother (but the effect is temporary).
Cons:
  • Expensive.
  • Massaging wrinkled areas daily is likely to hasten the breakdown of collagen and elastin.
  • Contains fragrant ingredients known to be irritating, which is pro-aging.

More Info:

Daily use of products that contain a high amount of fragrance, whether the fragrant ingredients are synthetic or natural, causes chronic irritation that can damage healthy collagen production, lead to or worsen dryness, and impair your skin's ability to heal. Fragrance-free is the best way to go for all skin types. If fragrance in your skin-care products is important to you, it should be a very low amount to minimize the risk to your skin (Sources: Inflammation Research, December 2008, pages 558–563; Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, June 2008, pages 124–135, and November-December 2000, pages 358–371; Journal of Investigative Dermatology, April 2008, pages 15–19; Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, March 2008, pages 78–82; Mechanisms of Ageing and Development, January 2007, pages 92–105; and British Journal of Dermatology, December 2005, pages S13–S22).

Community Reviews
Claims

Targets first wrinkles and fine lines all over the face (especially on the forehead, eyes and lip contour areas). Inspired by our massage techniques, this Smoothing roll-on maximises the smoothing properties of the chosen plant active ingredients.

Ingredients

Water, Butylene Glycol, Hdi/Trimethylol Hexyllactone Crosspolymer, Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil, Prunus Domestica Fruit Extract, Polydodecanamideaminium Triazadiphenylethenesulfonate, Pentaerythrityl Tetraisostearate, Glycerin, PEG-32, PEG-6, Sodium Polyacrylate, Prunus Amygdalus Dulcis (Sweet Almond) Seed Extract, Dextrin, Hydrolyzed Hibiscus Esculentus Extract, Phenyl Trimethicone, Fragrance (Parfum), Polyvinyl Alcohol Crosspolymer, Silica, Prunus Avium (Sweet Cherry) Fruit Extract, Silica Dimethyl Silylate, Sodium Hyaluronate, Tetrasodium EDTA, Codium Tomentosum Extract, Hydrolyzed Viola Tricolor Extract, Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein, Ethylhexylglycerin, Citrus Aurantium Amara (Bitter Orange) Neroli Oil, Pentylene Glycol, Linalool, Limonene, Hyaluronic Acid, Butylphenyl Methylpropional, Silanetriol, Hexyl Cinnamal, Hydroxycitronellal, Methylchloroisothiazolinone, Methylisothiazolinone, Geraniol.

Brand Overview

Decleor At-A-Glance

Strengths: None of note.

Weaknesses: Expensive; pervasive use of volatile essential oils that have limited to no benefit for skin and are known irritants; almost all the sunscreens lack the right UVA-protecting ingredients; no product to address acne or skin discolorations; inappropriate jar packaging.

What can you say about a skin-care line where almost 85% of the products contain volatile, fragrant plant oils that have research showing they are irritating to skin? Few lines in this book received so many unhappy faces for this reason alone—yet those very oils are Decleor's claim to fame. This spa-oriented company was begun in 1975 by a massage therapist and is now owned in part by Japan-based Shiseido (whose sunscreens trounce Decleor's by leaps and bounds).

Decleor is all about aromatherapy for skin. They speak freely of the purity of the essential oils they use and the distillation processes that keep them active, but that's precisely the cause for concern. Yes, lavender, bitter orange, rose, geranium, neroli, and other "essential" oils smell wonderful, but the very ingredients that create those intoxicating scents are what is responsible for causing skin irritation, inflammation, and, in some cases, phototoxic reactions. These essential oils have active constituents but, because they are not regulated as such, any company can use whichever ones they like in any concentration. Moreover, companies don't have to indicate the quantities that were used, leaving the consumer to guess. The concept of aromatherapy has well-established benefits concerning inhalation of scents and the effects they have on one's mood and, sometimes, physiological function. But enjoying these oils via inhalation (where they really can be beneficial) is different from applying them to skin, where hypersensitivity is well-documented and topical usage is cautioned (Sources: Current Pharmaceutical Design, December 2006, pages 3393–3399; Phytotherapy Research, September 2006, pages 758–763; European Journal of Oncology Nursing, April 2006, pages 140–149; The Journal of Nursing, August 2005, pages 11–15; and www.naturaldatabase.com).

Not only are most of Decleor's products a giant step backward for your skin, they're also a real misfortune when you consider Decleor's terrible sunscreens and lack of truly state-of-the-art ingredients. In short, experiencing these products in a relaxing spa environment may make you feel refreshed or invigorated—but if your goal is establishing a sensible, effective skin-care routine, you’ll need to keep shopping.

For more information about Decleor, call (888) 414-4471 or www.decleor.com.

About the Experts

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See all reviews for this brand

Decleor At-A-Glance

Strengths: None of note.

Weaknesses: Expensive; pervasive use of volatile essential oils that have limited to no benefit for skin and are known irritants; almost all the sunscreens lack the right UVA-protecting ingredients; no product to address acne or skin discolorations; inappropriate jar packaging.

What can you say about a skin-care line where almost 85% of the products contain volatile, fragrant plant oils that have research showing they are irritating to skin? Few lines in this book received so many unhappy faces for this reason alone—yet those very oils are Decleor's claim to fame. This spa-oriented company was begun in 1975 by a massage therapist and is now owned in part by Japan-based Shiseido (whose sunscreens trounce Decleor's by leaps and bounds).

Decleor is all about aromatherapy for skin. They speak freely of the purity of the essential oils they use and the distillation processes that keep them active, but that's precisely the cause for concern. Yes, lavender, bitter orange, rose, geranium, neroli, and other "essential" oils smell wonderful, but the very ingredients that create those intoxicating scents are what is responsible for causing skin irritation, inflammation, and, in some cases, phototoxic reactions. These essential oils have active constituents but, because they are not regulated as such, any company can use whichever ones they like in any concentration. Moreover, companies don't have to indicate the quantities that were used, leaving the consumer to guess. The concept of aromatherapy has well-established benefits concerning inhalation of scents and the effects they have on one's mood and, sometimes, physiological function. But enjoying these oils via inhalation (where they really can be beneficial) is different from applying them to skin, where hypersensitivity is well-documented and topical usage is cautioned (Sources: Current Pharmaceutical Design, December 2006, pages 3393–3399; Phytotherapy Research, September 2006, pages 758–763; European Journal of Oncology Nursing, April 2006, pages 140–149; The Journal of Nursing, August 2005, pages 11–15; and www.naturaldatabase.com).

Not only are most of Decleor's products a giant step backward for your skin, they're also a real misfortune when you consider Decleor's terrible sunscreens and lack of truly state-of-the-art ingredients. In short, experiencing these products in a relaxing spa environment may make you feel refreshed or invigorated—but if your goal is establishing a sensible, effective skin-care routine, you’ll need to keep shopping.

For more information about Decleor, call (888) 414-4471 or www.decleor.com.