04.20.2016
18
Super Rich Repair
1.7 fl. oz. for $84
Expert Rating
Community Rating (5)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:04.20.2016
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:No

Dermalogica describes its Super Rich Repair as a nourishing skin treatment designed to treat chronically dry skin. While it's certainly got the goods to do that, unfortunately there are a number of potentially iffy ingredients included in the formula, meaning ultimately this moisturizer doesn't earn our seal of approval.

First, here's what Super Rich Repair gets right: It includes a host of great emollients designed to soothe dry skin. Among them are jojoba seed oil, shea butter, evening primrose oil, and coconut oil. This moisturizer adds to the good ingredient list by including cell-communicating peptides and antioxidants, too—and they're all in a pump-style plastic container that ensures they'll remain stable because they aren't exposed to light and air.

So why is this earning our lowest rating? The issue is that in addition to the beneficial ingredients included, there are a host of potentially-problematic fragrance ingredients that pose a risk of irritation, which is the last thing dry skin needs! Among them are potent oils such as cedar bark oil, geranium oil, rosewood oil, and sandalwood oil. These would make an excellent perfume, but as we've said time and again, fragrance isn't skincare. (You can read more about the risk of skin problems fragrance ingredients pose in our More Info section below.)

Were it not for the inclusion of these ingredients, there's no question Dermalogica's Super Rich repair would earn much higher marks from us. As it stands though, it's a moisturizer we just can't recommend. For superior options, see our list of Best Moisturizers.

Pros:
  • Contains a number of emollients to soothe dry skin.
  • Formula includes skin-identical peptides and antioxidants.
  • Packaging will keep its light- and air-sensitive ingredients stable.
Cons:
  • Contains numerous fragrance ingredients that pose a risk of skin irritation.
More Info:

Irritation from High Amounts of Fragrance: Daily use of products that contain a high amount of fragrance, whether the fragrant ingredients are synthetic or natural, causes chronic irritation that can damage healthy collagen production, lead to or worsen dryness, and impair your skin's ability to heal. Fragrance-free is the best way for all skin types to go for all skin types (Food and Chemical Toxicology, 2008 & American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 2003).

The sneaky part about irritation is that research has demonstrated that you don't always need to see it or feel it for your skin to suffer damage, and that damage may remain hidden for a long time (Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, 2008).

In fact, the effect of inflammation in the skin is cumulative, and repeated exposure to irritants contributes to a weakened skin barrier, slower healing (including of red marks from breakouts), and a dull, uneven complexion (Aging, 2012 & Chemical Immunology and Allergy, 2012).

Community Reviews
Claims
Deeply nourishing skin treatment cream combats chronically dry, dehydrated skin. Help insulate skin from extreme environmental assaults and replenish critical moisture levels as powerful peptides help stimulate collagen production.
Ingredients
Water/Aqua/Eau, Isohexadecane, Dipropylene Glycol, Caprylic/Capric/Myristic/Stearic Triglyceride, Lauryl PEG-9 Polydimethylsiloxyethyl Dimethicone, Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil, Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea Butter), Dimethicone, Glycerin, Octyldodecyl Neopentanoate, Sodium Chloride, Isostearic Acid , Arginine/Lysine Polypeptide, Palmitoyl Tripeptide-5, Avena Sativa (Oat) Kernel Extract, Pyrus Malus (Apple) Seed Extract, Borago Officinalis Seed Oil, Oenothera Biennis (Evening Primrose) Oil, Hydrogenated Coconut Oil, Gardenia Tahitensis Flower, Algae Extract, Yeast Extract, Glucosamine HCl, Tocopheryl Acetate, Sodium Hyaluronate, Colloidal Oatmeal, Madecassoside, Genistein. Urea , Hexyldecanol, Polyglyceryl-4 Isostearate, Cetyl Dimethicone, Hydrogenated Castor Oil, Butylene Glycol, Phenoxyethanol, Caprylyl Glycol, Ethylhexylglycerin, Hexylene Glycol, Linalool, Citronellol, Geraniol, Cedrus Atlantica Bark Oil, Cupressus Sempervirens Leaf/Stem Extract, Eucalyptus Globulus Leaf Oil, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Pelargonium Graveolens Flower Oil, Aniba Rosaeodora (Rosewood) Wood Oil, Abies Siberica Oil, Santalum Album (Sandalwood) Oil.
Brand Overview

Dermalogica At-A-Glance

Strengths: Good eye-makeup remover; a unique skin-lightening product; a couple of commendable moisturizers, one with stabilized vitamin C.

Weaknesses: Expensive; almost every category has one or more products that contain irritating ingredients with no established benefit for skin; Clean Start and MediBac lines are particularly disappointing; the SPF products tend to be mediocre to poor.

Dermalogica's name implies a logical relationship to dermatology, which makes it sound as if you are getting serious skin care. The subtitle on their products is even more commanding: "A Skin Care System Researched and Developed by the International Dermal Institute." But what is the International Dermal Institute, you ask? Are there any dermatologists there? Apparently not: The International Dermal Institute is a Dermalogica-owned school for aestheticians who want an education beyond what is required for their cosmetology license, and the classes are taught by aestheticians.

Does the professional atmosphere of the school associated with Dermalogica mean better products? The proof is in the pudding, and this pudding is, for the most part, just Jell-O, not chocolate mousse. A company so concerned with skin-care education should be ashamed of itself for offering so many products that damage skin with known irritants and, more egregiously, offering so many sunscreens that lack sufficient UVA-protecting ingredients. Dermalogica's education-oriented, serious-minded, and clinical positioning doesn’t mesh with the majority of their products, and is on par with tobacco company executives teaching an aerobics class.

According to company history, the reason Dermalogica products came to be was that founder Jane Wurwand could not find a spa-oriented skin-care line that met her criteria. She was dismayed that so many skin-care lines aimed at the aesthetics market had products that contained alcohol, artificial colors, fragrance, mineral oil, and lanolin, ingredients that she believed had a well-documented history of problems. That's true for fragrance and alcohol (and artificial colors to a lesser extent), but mineral oil and lanolin have no documented history of causing skin problems. If anything, quite the opposite is true. Further, if Dermalogica's founders were so concerned about potentially or definitively harmful ingredients, why do their products contain so many of them? Where is the research proving that lavender oil, camphor, balm mint, arnica, ginger oil, and citrus oils are helpful for skin?

For more information about Dermalogica now owned by Unilever, call 1-800-345-2761 or visit www.dermalogica.com.

About the Experts

The new Beautypedia Team proudly and unequivocally maintains the commitment to help you find the best products possible for your skin. We do this by relentlessly pursuing and relying on published scientific research so you will have unbiased information on what works and what doesn't-and the sneaky ways you could be making your skin worse, not better!


The Beautypedia Team reviews all products using the same research, criteria, and objectivity, whether the product being reviewed is from Paula's Choice or another brand.

See all reviews for this brand

Dermalogica At-A-Glance

Strengths: Good eye-makeup remover; a unique skin-lightening product; a couple of commendable moisturizers, one with stabilized vitamin C.

Weaknesses: Expensive; almost every category has one or more products that contain irritating ingredients with no established benefit for skin; Clean Start and MediBac lines are particularly disappointing; the SPF products tend to be mediocre to poor.

Dermalogica's name implies a logical relationship to dermatology, which makes it sound as if you are getting serious skin care. The subtitle on their products is even more commanding: "A Skin Care System Researched and Developed by the International Dermal Institute." But what is the International Dermal Institute, you ask? Are there any dermatologists there? Apparently not: The International Dermal Institute is a Dermalogica-owned school for aestheticians who want an education beyond what is required for their cosmetology license, and the classes are taught by aestheticians.

Does the professional atmosphere of the school associated with Dermalogica mean better products? The proof is in the pudding, and this pudding is, for the most part, just Jell-O, not chocolate mousse. A company so concerned with skin-care education should be ashamed of itself for offering so many products that damage skin with known irritants and, more egregiously, offering so many sunscreens that lack sufficient UVA-protecting ingredients. Dermalogica's education-oriented, serious-minded, and clinical positioning doesn’t mesh with the majority of their products, and is on par with tobacco company executives teaching an aerobics class.

According to company history, the reason Dermalogica products came to be was that founder Jane Wurwand could not find a spa-oriented skin-care line that met her criteria. She was dismayed that so many skin-care lines aimed at the aesthetics market had products that contained alcohol, artificial colors, fragrance, mineral oil, and lanolin, ingredients that she believed had a well-documented history of problems. That's true for fragrance and alcohol (and artificial colors to a lesser extent), but mineral oil and lanolin have no documented history of causing skin problems. If anything, quite the opposite is true. Further, if Dermalogica's founders were so concerned about potentially or definitively harmful ingredients, why do their products contain so many of them? Where is the research proving that lavender oil, camphor, balm mint, arnica, ginger oil, and citrus oils are helpful for skin?

For more information about Dermalogica now owned by Unilever, call 1-800-345-2761 or visit www.dermalogica.com.