12.17.2014
1
Dermalogica
Intensive Moisture Balance
Rating
1.7 fl. oz. for $41
Category:Skin Care > Moisturizers (Daytime and Nighttime) > Moisturizer without Sunscreen
Last Updated:12.17.2014
Jar Packaging:False
pH:
Tested on animals:No
Overview

Intensive Moisture Balance is among the few Dermalogica products we recommend, though you can find superior moisturizer for less money. The formula is best for dry skin and it contains some beneficial plant extracts as well as antioxidant vitamins and a tiny amount of repairing ingredients. Its only drawbacks include the rose flower extract and a small amount of fragrance ingredients that have the potential to cause irritation. The rose flower is the bigger cause for concern; fragrance-free is the preferred way to go for all skin types, including when you’re struggling with signs of aging.

Claims

Ultra-rich antioxidant moisturizer for dry skin. Smooth away the appearance of dry lines and skin damage with stabilized Vitamin C. Antioxidant enzyme Superoxide Dismutase, vitamins A and E, and Ginkgo help shield against damage caused by environmental assaults. Soothing Echinacea and Centella Asiatica, combined with extracts of Grape Seed and Wild Yam, help reduce the signs of prematurely-aging skin, leaving it smooth and firmer-looking.

Ingredients

Water, Ethylhexyl Hydroxystearate, Cetearyl Ethylhexanoate, Butylene Glycol, PEG-8, Stearic Acid, Dimethicone, Glyceryl Stearate, PEG-100 Stearate, Lactamide MEA, Cetyl Dimethicone, Cetyl Alcohol, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Rosa Centifolia Flower Extract, Centella Asiatica Extract, Echinacea Purpurea Extract, Vitis Vinifera (Grape) Seed Extract, Camellia Oleifera Leaf Extract, Ginkgo Biloba Leaf Extract, Dioscorea Villosa (Wild Yam) Root Extract, Lecithin, Sodium Hyaluronate, Glycolipids, Retinyl Palmitate, Ascorbyl Palmitate, Phospholipids, Tocopheryl Acetate, Superoxide Dismutase, Sodium PCA, Ethylhexylglycerin, Phenoxyethanol, Carbomer, Potassium Cetyl Phosphate, Disodium EDTA, Aminomethyl Propanol, Citronellol, Geraniol, Linalool

Brand Overview

Dermalogica At-A-Glance

Strengths: Good eye-makeup remover; a unique skin-lightening product; a couple of commendable moisturizers, one with stabilized vitamin C.

Weaknesses: Expensive; almost every category has one or more products that contain irritating ingredients with no established benefit for skin; Clean Start and MediBac lines are particularly disappointing; the SPF products tend to be mediocre to poor.

Dermalogica's name implies a logical relationship to dermatology, which makes it sound as if you are getting serious skin care. The subtitle on their products is even more commanding: "A Skin Care System Researched and Developed by the International Dermal Institute." But what is the International Dermal Institute, you ask? Are there any dermatologists there? Apparently not: The International Dermal Institute is a Dermalogica-owned school for aestheticians who want an education beyond what is required for their cosmetology license, and the classes are taught by aestheticians.

Does the professional atmosphere of the school associated with Dermalogica mean better products? The proof is in the pudding, and this pudding is, for the most part, just Jell-O, not chocolate mousse. A company so concerned with skin-care education should be ashamed of itself for offering so many products that damage skin with known irritants and, more egregiously, offering so many sunscreens that lack sufficient UVA-protecting ingredients. Dermalogica's education-oriented, serious-minded, and clinical positioning doesn’t mesh with the majority of their products, and is on par with tobacco company executives teaching an aerobics class.

According to company history, the reason Dermalogica products came to be was that founder Jane Wurwand could not find a spa-oriented skin-care line that met her criteria. She was dismayed that so many skin-care lines aimed at the aesthetics market had products that contained alcohol, artificial colors, fragrance, mineral oil, and lanolin, ingredients that she believed had a well-documented history of problems. That's true for fragrance and alcohol (and artificial colors to a lesser extent), but mineral oil and lanolin have no documented history of causing skin problems. If anything, quite the opposite is true. Further, if Dermalogica's founders were so concerned about potentially or definitively harmful ingredients, why do their products contain so many of them? Where is the research proving that lavender oil, camphor, balm mint, arnica, ginger oil, and citrus oils are helpful for skin?

For more information about Dermalogica, call 1-800-345-2761 or visit www.dermalogica.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia Research Team is dedicated to helping you find the absolute best products for your skin, using research-based criteria to review beauty products from an honest, balanced perspective. Each member of the team was personally trained by Paula Begoun herself.

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Thursday, January 09, 2014
Like but not love

Better than less expensive brands. But, I used to be in love with this moisturizer. But, I think they reformulated it. Because it used to be more moist. I loved dermologica because I swear they used oils and yet their products never broke me out. I'm extremely acne-prone. And have extremely dry skin so this was true love. I still like dermologica but it's not true love.I don't like the change. I'm very disappointed.

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Annette D.
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