Omega-3 Eye Treatment with Cooling Wand

Price:
$39 - 0.5 fl. oz.
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Category:
Skin Care > Retinol Products > Eye Moisturizers
Last Updated:
5/6/2013
Jar Packaging:
Yes
Tested On Animals:
No

This very silky, fragrance-free waterless eye cream from Dr. Denese comes in a jar, which is a crying shame because most of its best ingredients won't remain stable for long in this type of packaging (see More Info for details). The "Cooling Wand" this comes with is an interesting way to apply this product, but not essential. Besides, you need to consider how you're going to store the wand to keep it clean—just tossing it in a drawer and digging it out daily won't cut it!

More important, though, is most eye creams aren't necessary. We know that sound shocking but this product reinforces that truth because it doesn't contain anything that's special for the eye area. Indeed, most of the ingredients in this product will benefit skin anywhere on the face. If you're using a serum that contains such ingredients (such as any from the Denese line) you don't need to add this product, too—and in fact, you shouldn't owing to the problematic jar packaging.

If you choose to use one anyway it should be a formula like this—but in better packaging. The mix of antioxidants and repairing ingredients this contains is quite good.

Pros:
  • Contains a good mix of antioxidants and repairing ingredients.
  • Fragrance-free.
  • Super-silky texture.
Cons:
  • Jar packaging won't keep the most beneficial ingredients stable once opened.
  • The cooling wand is separate from the product, so you need to find a clean, dry place to store it.
More Info:

Jar Packaging: The fact that it's packaged in a jar means the beneficial ingredients won't remain stable once it is opened. All plant extracts, vitamins, antioxidants, and other state-of-the-art ingredients break down in the presence of air, so once a jar is opened and lets the air in these important ingredients begin to deteriorate. Jars also are unsanitary because you're dipping your fingers into them with each use, adding bacteria which further deteriorate the beneficial ingredients (Sources: Free Radical Biology and Medicine, September 2007, pages 818-829; Ageing Research Reviews, December 2007, pages 271-288; Dermatologic Therapy, September-October 2007, pages 314-321; International Journal of Pharmaceutics, June 12, 2005, pages 197-203; Pharmaceutical Development and Technology, January 2002, pages 1-32; International Society for Horticultural Science, www.actahort.org/members/showpdf?booknrarnr=778_5; Beautypackaging.com, and www.beautypackaging.com/articles/2007/03/airless-packaging.php).

Why You May Not Need an Eye Cream: Most eye creams aren't necessary. That's either because they are poorly formulated, contain nothing special for the eye area, or come in packaging that won't keep key ingredients stable. Just because the product is labeled as an eye cream doesn't mean it's good for your eye area; in fact, many can actually make matters worse.

There is much you can do to improve signs of aging around your eyes. Any product loaded with antioxidants, skin-repairing ingredients, skin-lightening ingredients, anti-inflammatory ingredients, and effective emollients will work wonders and those ingredients don't have to come from a product labeled as an eye cream.

You would be shocked how many eye creams lack even the most basic ingredients to help skin. For example, most eye creams don't contain sunscreen. During the day that is a serious problem because it leaves the skin around your eyes vulnerable to sun damage and this absolutely will make dark circles, puffiness, and wrinkles worse!

Whatever product you put around your eye area, regardless of what it is labeled, must be well formulated and appropriate for the skin type around your eyes! That may mean you need an eye cream, but you may also do just as well applying your regular facial moisturizer around your eyes.

Formulated with rich ingredients that include omega-3 lipids and molucanna nut oil, Omega-3 PhytoFix Eye Treatment helps attack the signs of aging around the eye area.

Dimethicone, Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Aleurites Moluccana Seed Oil, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, Bakuchiol, Glycine Soja (Soybean) Seed Extract, Ceramide 2, Tocopheryl Acetate, Retinyl Palmitate, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Cake, Hordeum Vulgare (Barley) Extract, Cucumis Sativus (Cucumber) Extract, Propylene Glycol Dicaprate, Mica, Phenoxyethanol

This doctor-designed skin-care line was, without question, the one most requested for review by our readers, primarily due to its prominence on QVC's Web site and home shopping program.

A graduate of New York's Cornell Medical College, Dr. Adrienne Denese opened an anti-aging clinic in Manhattan shortly after completing her studies. It has become extremely successful, to the point where she felt it necessary to create her own products to make sure her skin-care advice was being taken.

Her book, Dr. Denese's Secrets for Ageless Skin: Younger Skin in 8 Weeks, on how to take care of your skin, is much like Dr. Perricone's book The Wrinkle Cure, in that both promise to get rid of (or at least really, really minimize) your wrinkles. Another similarity is the lack of supporting research or studies to back up the claims in either book. Neither Dr. Perricone nor Dr. Denese source their information, and more often than not, there are no research reports or supporting studies to be found. We are just supposed to take their word for everything they say. Denese naturally uses her gender more than Perricone to establish credibility and empathy with female consumers (who, no secret, purchase the vast majority of skin-care products out there), and also routinely appears on QVC to discuss her products.

Ironically, her product line, sold exclusively via QVC and Denese's Web site, makes much more sense than a lot of what she writes in her book. After reading the book and evaluating her namesake line, we noted some interesting and frustrating statements and conflicts that deserve attention. One of her statements that we found most surprising, for a dermatologist keen on anti-aging medicine, was: "If a skin-care product doesn't work, it's not the consumer's fault." This statement is not untrue, it's just incomplete. Dr. Denese contends that no one can afford to throw away money on products that don't work, a point with which we truly agree. However, she mentions nothing about carefully establishing a skin-care routine and then following through on it. Unfortunately, many consumers don't follow through, and that's a big reason why they don't get the results they want from products.

For example, using an anti-acne product only occasionally, or not applying sunscreen daily or liberally enough, won't benefit your skin and could easily lead you to believe that the unimpressive results mean the product is faulty.

Moreover, some skin-care problems (like sagging) are beyond what any product can address. (That's why there are dermatologists and plastic surgeons with thriving practices.) All the dermatologists we have interviewed over the years agree that patient compliance with and adherence to skin-care routines and the regimen of topical medications is an ongoing challenge, and there is research supporting that (Source: Dermatologic Therapy, July-August 2006, pages 224–236). Dr. Denese also understands this, as evidenced from her comment about the Dr. Obagi System (for skin discolorations): "The only times I've seen the Obagi System fail is [sic] when patients have skipped steps and ignored instructions."

In another statement Dr. Denese refers to petrolatum and mineral oil as "junk food for skin," stating that "they feel good but they clog your pores." This is not a true statement because neither substance is capable of becoming hard and clogging the lining of the pore. In fact, both of these ingredients have impressive research proving their benefit, mildness, and effectiveness for skin (Sources: Cutis, September 2004, pages 109–116; and Dry Skin and Moisturizers: Chemistry and Function, CRC Press, 2000, pages 252–254).

Petrolatum and mineral oil have greasy textures, so they're not the best-feeling ingredients for someone with oily or acne-prone skin, but in this case greasiness does not equal clogged pores.

Dr. Denese also refers to blackheads as dirt, which is completely false. Blackheads are composed of sebum, dead skin cells, and other debris (mostly tiny hairs) that make up the follicle lining of the pore. The oxidation that occurs as this mixture of sebum and dead skin cells reaches the pore opening is what causes the blackness—it has nothing to do with cleanliness (Sources: Clinical Dermatology, September-October 2004, pages 367–374; Cutis, August 2004, pages 92–97; and American Academy of Dermatology, www.aad.org).

According to Dr. Denese, you cannot exfoliate too much. Yet she doesn't warn against the potential for irritation when too much of a good thing becomes a punishment rather than a benefit, which absolutely can occur with over-exfoliation.

Surprisingly, Dr. Denese does not recommend salicylic acid (BHA) for exfoliation. Instead, she prefers AHAs (glycolic and lactic acids) because AHAs may be used at higher concentrations than BHA. However, the difference in concentrations between AHAs and BHA is not about quantity. Rather, it's because they work best at different concentrations, and also perform differently. That is, a higher concentration of AHA is not more effective or better than a lower concentration of BHA. AHAs are most effective at 5% to 10%, while BHA is most effective at 1% to 2%. In the world of skin care, there are many examples where a higher percentage of an ingredient doesn't necessarily equate with superior effects, as is the case with AHA and BHA (Sources: Women’s Health in Primary Care, July 2003, pages 333–339; Journal of Dermatological Treatment, April 2004, pages 88–93; Dermatology, January 1999, pages 50–53; and Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, April 1997, pages 589–593).

Despite the incomplete information (or in some cases, misinformation) in her book, Denese has crafted some remarkably state-of-the-art products, and the prices, though steep, aren't unreasonable.

As is true for most skin-care lines (including those from dermatologists), there are shortcomings and missteps along with good products here. For those who choose the best of what Dr. Denese has to offer, the rewards will be smiling at them in the mirror each day (but please don't take that to mean your wrinkles will be gone)!

Note: All Dr. Denese products contain fragrance unless otherwise noted.

For more information about Dr. Denese New York, call 866-642-3754 or visit www.drdenese.com.

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About the Experts

Paula Begoun is the best-selling author of 20 books on skin care and makeup. She is known worldwide as the Cosmetics Cop and creator of Paula's Choice. Paula's expertise has led to hundreds of appearances on national and international television including:

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The Paula's Choice Research Team is dedicated to helping you find the absolute best products for your skin, using research-based criteria to review beauty products from an honest, balanced perspective. Each member of the team was personally trained by Paula herself.

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