12.31.2012
1
Pro C Eye Illuminating Treatment
0.5 fl. oz. for $49.50
Expert Rating
Community Rating (0)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:12.31.2012
Jar Packaging:Yes
Tested on animals:No

This eye cream has a silky texture yet a dry finish that doesn’t provide much moisture. Its effect on dark circles has to do with the high amount of mica (a shiny mineral pigment) and titanium dioxide it contains. Both work, cosmetically (meaning it’s more makeup than skin care) to optically brighten dark circles, though you can get better results (plus coverage) from a good concealer.

The formula contains a good amount of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) as well as other antioxidants, yet none of them will remain stable once this jar-packaged product is opened. Please see More Info below for details on the problems jar packaging present—and also learn why, despite what you constantly hear, eye creams usually aren't necessary.

In the end, this isn’t an eye cream to get excited about, as its main benefits are cosmetics visual trickery, not state-of-the-art skin care (though this contains some state-of-the-art ingredients, they simply won’t remain stable in jar packaging).

Pros:
  • Silky texture smoothes fine lines.
  • Contains ingredients that help brighten shadowed areas.
Cons:
  • Expensive.
  • Contains fragrant plant ingredients that shouldn’t be used around the eyes.
  • Jar packaging won’t keep the most important ingredients stable during use.
  • Contains a growth factor ingredient, which is controversial.

More Info:

Jar Packaging
The fact that it’s packaged in a jar means the beneficial ingredients won't remain stable once it is opened. All plant extracts, vitamins, antioxidants, and other state-of-the-art ingredients break down in the presence of air, so once a jar is opened and lets the air in these important ingredients begin to deteriorate. Jars also are unsanitary because you’re dipping your fingers into them with each use, adding bacteria which further deteriorate the beneficial ingredients.

Why You May Not Need an Eye Cream

Most eye creams aren't necessary. That's either because they are poorly formulated, contain nothing special for the eye area, or come in packaging that won't keep key ingredients stable. Just because the product is labeled as an eye cream doesn't mean it's good for your eye area; in fact, many can actually make matters worse.

There is much you can do to improve signs of aging around your eyes. Any product loaded with antioxidants, skin-repairing ingredients, skin-lightening ingredients, anti-inflammatory ingredients, and effective emollients will work wonders and those ingredients don't have to come from a product labeled as an eye cream.

You would be shocked how many eye creams lack even the most basic ingredients to help skin. For example, most eye creams don't contain sunscreen. During the day that is a serious problem because it leaves the skin around your eyes vulnerable to sun damage and this absolutely will make dark circles, puffiness, and wrinkles worse!

Whatever product you put around your eye area, regardless of what it is labeled, must be well formulated and appropriate for the skin type around your eyes! That may mean you need an eye cream, but you may also do just as well applying your regular facial moisturizer around your eyes.

Community Reviews
Claims

A daily eye treatment that uses light diffusers to visibly and instantly brighten and illuminate dark skin under the eyes, creating a youthful, radiant appearance.

Ingredients

Cyclopentasiloxane, C30-45 Alkyl Cetearyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Isohexadecane, Silica, Bismuth Oxychloride, C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, PEG/PPG-20/23 Dimethicone, Mica, Polymethylsilsesquioxane Benzimidazole Diamond Amidoethylcarbamoylpropyl Polymethylsilsesquioxane, Titanium Dioxide, Ascorbic Acid, Polysilicone-11, Ethylhexyl Hydroxystearate, Acetyl Dipeptide-1 Cetyl Ester, Ubiquinone (CoQ10), Dipeptide Diaminobutyroyl Benzylamide Diacetate, Acetyl Hexapeptide-8, Palmitoyl Oligopeptide, Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide-7, Oligopeptide-1, Transforming Growth Factor-1, Oligopeptide-11, Butylene Glycol, Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea Butter), Tocopheryl Acetate, Caprylyl Glycol, Glycerin, Iron Oxides, Camellia Sinensis Leaf Extract, Citrus Medica Limonum (Lemon) Peel Extract, Sorbitan Laurate, Phyllanthus Emblica Fruit Extract, Methylsilanol Mannuronate, Hydrolyzed Soy Protein, Secale Cereale (Rye) Seed Extract, Stearic Acid, Steareth-20, Steareth-2, Hydroxyethylcellulose, Pyrus Communis (Pear) Fruit Extract, Yeast Extract, Yeast Polysaccharides, Xanthan Gum, Hibiscus Sabdari_a Flower Extract, Ferula Assa Foetida Root Extract, Lecithin, Dextrin, Hydrolyzed Hibiscus Esculentus Extract, Tocopherol, Carbomer, Polysorbate 20, Yellow 5 Lake, Phenoxyethanol.

Brand Overview

Dr. Denese New York At-A-Glance

Strengths: Several well-formulated serums and moisturizers that are reasonably priced; a very good matte-finish, tinted sunscreen with zinc oxide; uses well-researched, proven ingredients that truly benefit skin, and uses them in higher concentrations than most skin-care lines.

Weaknesses: Problematic toner; inclusion of unnecessary irritants such as lavender oil and menthol; limited options for sun protection; a few gimmicky, multi-step kits and specialty products that are easily replaced by other products in her line.

This doctor-designed skin-care line was, without question, the one most requested for review by our readers, primarily due to its prominence on QVC's Web site and home shopping program.

A graduate of New York's Cornell Medical College, Dr. Adrienne Denese opened an anti-aging clinic in Manhattan shortly after completing her studies. It has become extremely successful, to the point where she felt it necessary to create her own products to make sure her skin-care advice was being taken.

Her book, Dr. Denese's Secrets for Ageless Skin: Younger Skin in 8 Weeks, on how to take care of your skin, is much like Dr. Perricone's book The Wrinkle Cure, in that both promise to get rid of (or at least really, really minimize) your wrinkles. Another similarity is the lack of supporting research or studies to back up the claims in either book. Neither Dr. Perricone nor Dr. Denese source their information, and more often than not, there are no research reports or supporting studies to be found. We are just supposed to take their word for everything they say. Denese naturally uses her gender more than Perricone to establish credibility and empathy with female consumers (who, no secret, purchase the vast majority of skin-care products out there), and also routinely appears on QVC to discuss her products.

Ironically, her product line, sold exclusively via QVC and Denese's Web site, makes much more sense than a lot of what she writes in her book. After reading the book and evaluating her namesake line, we noted some interesting and frustrating statements and conflicts that deserve attention. One of her statements that we found most surprising, for a dermatologist keen on anti-aging medicine, was: "If a skin-care product doesn't work, it's not the consumer's fault." This statement is not untrue, it's just incomplete. Dr. Denese contends that no one can afford to throw away money on products that don't work, a point with which we truly agree. However, she mentions nothing about carefully establishing a skin-care routine and then following through on it. Unfortunately, many consumers don't follow through, and that's a big reason why they don't get the results they want from products.

For example, using an anti-acne product only occasionally, or not applying sunscreen daily or liberally enough, won't benefit your skin and could easily lead you to believe that the unimpressive results mean the product is faulty.

Moreover, some skin-care problems (like sagging) are beyond what any product can address. (That's why there are dermatologists and plastic surgeons with thriving practices.) All the dermatologists we have interviewed over the years agree that patient compliance with and adherence to skin-care routines and the regimen of topical medications is an ongoing challenge, and there is research supporting that (Source: Dermatologic Therapy, July-August 2006, pages 224–236). Dr. Denese also understands this, as evidenced from her comment about the Dr. Obagi System (for skin discolorations): "The only times I've seen the Obagi System fail is [sic] when patients have skipped steps and ignored instructions."

In another statement Dr. Denese refers to petrolatum and mineral oil as "junk food for skin," stating that "they feel good but they clog your pores." This is not a true statement because neither substance is capable of becoming hard and clogging the lining of the pore. In fact, both of these ingredients have impressive research proving their benefit, mildness, and effectiveness for skin (Sources: Cutis, September 2004, pages 109–116; and Dry Skin and Moisturizers: Chemistry and Function, CRC Press, 2000, pages 252–254).

Petrolatum and mineral oil have greasy textures, so they're not the best-feeling ingredients for someone with oily or acne-prone skin, but in this case greasiness does not equal clogged pores.

Dr. Denese also refers to blackheads as dirt, which is completely false. Blackheads are composed of sebum, dead skin cells, and other debris (mostly tiny hairs) that make up the follicle lining of the pore. The oxidation that occurs as this mixture of sebum and dead skin cells reaches the pore opening is what causes the blackness—it has nothing to do with cleanliness (Sources: Clinical Dermatology, September-October 2004, pages 367–374; Cutis, August 2004, pages 92–97; and American Academy of Dermatology, www.aad.org).

According to Dr. Denese, you cannot exfoliate too much. Yet she doesn't warn against the potential for irritation when too much of a good thing becomes a punishment rather than a benefit, which absolutely can occur with over-exfoliation.

Surprisingly, Dr. Denese does not recommend salicylic acid (BHA) for exfoliation. Instead, she prefers AHAs (glycolic and lactic acids) because AHAs may be used at higher concentrations than BHA. However, the difference in concentrations between AHAs and BHA is not about quantity. Rather, it's because they work best at different concentrations, and also perform differently. That is, a higher concentration of AHA is not more effective or better than a lower concentration of BHA. AHAs are most effective at 5% to 10%, while BHA is most effective at 1% to 2%. In the world of skin care, there are many examples where a higher percentage of an ingredient doesn't necessarily equate with superior effects, as is the case with AHA and BHA (Sources: Women’s Health in Primary Care, July 2003, pages 333–339; Journal of Dermatological Treatment, April 2004, pages 88–93; Dermatology, January 1999, pages 50–53; and Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, April 1997, pages 589–593).

Despite the incomplete information (or in some cases, misinformation) in her book, Denese has crafted some remarkably state-of-the-art products, and the prices, though steep, aren't unreasonable.

As is true for most skin-care lines (including those from dermatologists), there are shortcomings and missteps along with good products here. For those who choose the best of what Dr. Denese has to offer, the rewards will be smiling at them in the mirror each day (but please don't take that to mean your wrinkles will be gone)!

Note: All Dr. Denese products contain fragrance unless otherwise noted.

For more information about Dr. Denese New York, call 866-642-3754 or visit www.drdenese.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Dr. Denese New York At-A-Glance

Strengths: Several well-formulated serums and moisturizers that are reasonably priced; a very good matte-finish, tinted sunscreen with zinc oxide; uses well-researched, proven ingredients that truly benefit skin, and uses them in higher concentrations than most skin-care lines.

Weaknesses: Problematic toner; inclusion of unnecessary irritants such as lavender oil and menthol; limited options for sun protection; a few gimmicky, multi-step kits and specialty products that are easily replaced by other products in her line.

This doctor-designed skin-care line was, without question, the one most requested for review by our readers, primarily due to its prominence on QVC's Web site and home shopping program.

A graduate of New York's Cornell Medical College, Dr. Adrienne Denese opened an anti-aging clinic in Manhattan shortly after completing her studies. It has become extremely successful, to the point where she felt it necessary to create her own products to make sure her skin-care advice was being taken.

Her book, Dr. Denese's Secrets for Ageless Skin: Younger Skin in 8 Weeks, on how to take care of your skin, is much like Dr. Perricone's book The Wrinkle Cure, in that both promise to get rid of (or at least really, really minimize) your wrinkles. Another similarity is the lack of supporting research or studies to back up the claims in either book. Neither Dr. Perricone nor Dr. Denese source their information, and more often than not, there are no research reports or supporting studies to be found. We are just supposed to take their word for everything they say. Denese naturally uses her gender more than Perricone to establish credibility and empathy with female consumers (who, no secret, purchase the vast majority of skin-care products out there), and also routinely appears on QVC to discuss her products.

Ironically, her product line, sold exclusively via QVC and Denese's Web site, makes much more sense than a lot of what she writes in her book. After reading the book and evaluating her namesake line, we noted some interesting and frustrating statements and conflicts that deserve attention. One of her statements that we found most surprising, for a dermatologist keen on anti-aging medicine, was: "If a skin-care product doesn't work, it's not the consumer's fault." This statement is not untrue, it's just incomplete. Dr. Denese contends that no one can afford to throw away money on products that don't work, a point with which we truly agree. However, she mentions nothing about carefully establishing a skin-care routine and then following through on it. Unfortunately, many consumers don't follow through, and that's a big reason why they don't get the results they want from products.

For example, using an anti-acne product only occasionally, or not applying sunscreen daily or liberally enough, won't benefit your skin and could easily lead you to believe that the unimpressive results mean the product is faulty.

Moreover, some skin-care problems (like sagging) are beyond what any product can address. (That's why there are dermatologists and plastic surgeons with thriving practices.) All the dermatologists we have interviewed over the years agree that patient compliance with and adherence to skin-care routines and the regimen of topical medications is an ongoing challenge, and there is research supporting that (Source: Dermatologic Therapy, July-August 2006, pages 224–236). Dr. Denese also understands this, as evidenced from her comment about the Dr. Obagi System (for skin discolorations): "The only times I've seen the Obagi System fail is [sic] when patients have skipped steps and ignored instructions."

In another statement Dr. Denese refers to petrolatum and mineral oil as "junk food for skin," stating that "they feel good but they clog your pores." This is not a true statement because neither substance is capable of becoming hard and clogging the lining of the pore. In fact, both of these ingredients have impressive research proving their benefit, mildness, and effectiveness for skin (Sources: Cutis, September 2004, pages 109–116; and Dry Skin and Moisturizers: Chemistry and Function, CRC Press, 2000, pages 252–254).

Petrolatum and mineral oil have greasy textures, so they're not the best-feeling ingredients for someone with oily or acne-prone skin, but in this case greasiness does not equal clogged pores.

Dr. Denese also refers to blackheads as dirt, which is completely false. Blackheads are composed of sebum, dead skin cells, and other debris (mostly tiny hairs) that make up the follicle lining of the pore. The oxidation that occurs as this mixture of sebum and dead skin cells reaches the pore opening is what causes the blackness—it has nothing to do with cleanliness (Sources: Clinical Dermatology, September-October 2004, pages 367–374; Cutis, August 2004, pages 92–97; and American Academy of Dermatology, www.aad.org).

According to Dr. Denese, you cannot exfoliate too much. Yet she doesn't warn against the potential for irritation when too much of a good thing becomes a punishment rather than a benefit, which absolutely can occur with over-exfoliation.

Surprisingly, Dr. Denese does not recommend salicylic acid (BHA) for exfoliation. Instead, she prefers AHAs (glycolic and lactic acids) because AHAs may be used at higher concentrations than BHA. However, the difference in concentrations between AHAs and BHA is not about quantity. Rather, it's because they work best at different concentrations, and also perform differently. That is, a higher concentration of AHA is not more effective or better than a lower concentration of BHA. AHAs are most effective at 5% to 10%, while BHA is most effective at 1% to 2%. In the world of skin care, there are many examples where a higher percentage of an ingredient doesn't necessarily equate with superior effects, as is the case with AHA and BHA (Sources: Women’s Health in Primary Care, July 2003, pages 333–339; Journal of Dermatological Treatment, April 2004, pages 88–93; Dermatology, January 1999, pages 50–53; and Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, April 1997, pages 589–593).

Despite the incomplete information (or in some cases, misinformation) in her book, Denese has crafted some remarkably state-of-the-art products, and the prices, though steep, aren't unreasonable.

As is true for most skin-care lines (including those from dermatologists), there are shortcomings and missteps along with good products here. For those who choose the best of what Dr. Denese has to offer, the rewards will be smiling at them in the mirror each day (but please don't take that to mean your wrinkles will be gone)!

Note: All Dr. Denese products contain fragrance unless otherwise noted.

For more information about Dr. Denese New York, call 866-642-3754 or visit www.drdenese.com.