07.21.2016
36
Every Sun Day UV Illuminating Sunscreen SPF 36
1.7 fl. oz. for $34
Expert Rating
Community Rating (1)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:07.21.2016
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

Every Sun Day UV Illuminating Sunscreen SPF 36 combines mineral and synthetic sunscreen actives in a lightweight formula that's great for normal to oily skin, but it's lack of broad spectrum sun protection makes it not worth strong consideration. What a shame, as otherwise this has beautiful esthetics!

Fragrance free, this daytime moisturizer with SPF contains the mineral pigment mica for an instant (and lasting) glow. (Note that this "glow" can be softened if you apply foundation over it.)

This sheer formula is easy to blend and hydrates without feeling too slick or greasy. It's not enough moisture for dry skin, though, despite that it is marketed as providing "70% more moisture than regular sun cream."

You're also getting a nice mix of plant- and vitamin-based antioxidants. We didn't see a trace of white residue from the mineral sunscreen titanium dioxide, something we look for and alert our readers of when it's apparent.

As you can see, this SPF product has a lot going for it, so it's disappointing we cannot enthusiastically recommend it. See our list of Best Daytime Moisturizers with Sunscreen for better options.

IMPORTANT NOTE: When this product review debuted, it was rated higher and listed as offering broad spectrum sun protection, which we realized later on was a mistake. We apologize for the error and any confusion it may have caused.

Pros:
  • Lightweight, sheer formula.
  • Adds a luminous glow.
  • Contains a nice mix of plant- and vitamin-based antioxidants.
  • No trace of white residue.
  • Fragrance free.
Cons:
  • Dry skin types: This isn't as moisturizing as the marketing claims.
  • Doesn't provide broad spectrum protection from UV light.
More Info:

Sunscreens Not Rated "Broad Spectrum": Although this sunscreen may contain ingredients that have the potential to provide broad-spectrum sun protection, it also bears this warning as part of the Drug Facts labeling:

"Skin Cancer/Skin Aging Alert: Spending time in the sun increases your risk of skin cancer and early skin aging. This product has been shown only to help prevent sunburn, not skin cancer or early skin aging."

This product's label indicates that the formula did not meet the broad-spectrum testing requirements of the FDA (U.S. Food & Drug Administration, 2012), so it isn't as anti-aging capable as many other SPF-rated products.

To ensure your sunscreen provides both UVA and UVB protection, it must be labeled "broad spectrum" and also contain one or more of these UVA-protecting ingredients listed as "active": avobenzone, titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, Mexoryl SX (ecamsule) or Tinosorb (Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 2005).

How We Rate Sunscreens vs. Daytime Moisturizers with SPF: Sunscreens are judged based upon whether they provide broad-spectrum sun protection, their SPF rating, potential for irritation, packaging and aesthetics. Additional qualities that push it into four or five star (best-rated) category are the inclusion of meaningful amounts of repairing, cell communicating or antioxidant ingredients as well as unique characteristics that enhance its wearability.

"Sunscreens" are differentiated from "Daytime Moisturizers with SPF" by three primary qualities.

• They must be marketed as "sunscreens" only by the brand.

• They lack specific anti-aging claims.

• Their size is greater than 2 ounces, unless it is specifically called out as a sunscreen for the face and is not positioned as a facial/daytime moisturizer with SPF.

For more detail on how we rate this category of products, see the Best Sunscreens section of Beautypedia.

Community Reviews
Claims
An all-in-one moisturizing sunscreen that brings radiance and brightness to the skin. This protective illuminating base and sunscreen utilizes UVB-isolating ingredients to block out damaging UVB rays—one of the causes of premature aging. Micro opal pearl refracts and reflects different angles of light to brighten skin while covering imperfections. UVB-protecting ingredients are immediately absorbed upon application for a flawless finish. The formula contains 70 percent more moisture than regular sun cream for maximum hydration. UV-protecting ingredients are dissolved to diminish the appearance of white residue after application.
Ingredients

Active Ingredients: Octinoxate 7.000%, Octisalate 4.500%, Ensulizole 4.00%, Titanium Dioxide 2.305%, Octocrylene 1.000%. Inactive Ingredients: Water, Butylene Glycol, Mica, Butyloctyl Salicylate, C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Cetearyl Olivate, Cetearyl Alcohol, Glyceryl Stearate, Sorbitan Olivate, Sodium Hydroxide, Polysorbate 60, Polyacrylate-13, Dimethicone, Caprylyl Glycol, Sorbitan Stearate, Polyisobutene, PEG-100 Stearate, Ethylhexylglycerin, Disodium EDTA, Tocopheryl Acetate, Polysorbate 20, 1,2-Hexanediol, Sorbitan Isostearate, Trichosanthes Kirilowii Root Extract, Ipomoea Purpurea Extract, Mirabilis Jalapa Flower/Leaf/Stem Extract, Oenothera Biennis (Evening Primrose) Flower Extract, Portulaca Oleracea Extract, Phellodendron Amurense Bark Extract, Glycine Soja (Soybean) Seed Extract, Chrysanthemum Indicum Flower Extract, Phenoxyethanol, Panthenol, Polyglutamic Acid

Brand Overview

Dr. Jart+ At-a-Glance

Strengths: The BB creams (Beauty Balms) provide broad-spectrum sun protection and are fragrance-free.

Weaknesses: Expensive; BB creams are little more than tinted moisturizers with sunscreen; the masks are gimmicky and minimally helpful for skin.

Dr. Jart+ is a line of skin-care products based in Korea. Its most popular products are the Beauty Balms, known in the United States as BB creams. Before we discuss this brand's contribution to the BB cream craze, we want to state that at this time we are reviewing only the Dr. Jart+ products that are available at U.S. Sephora stores. If you visit the Korean Dr. Jart+ Web site, you'll see several other skin-care products are offered. We might review those in the future, but it's clear that the questions we've received about this brand have to do with the BB creams.

No information is available about an actual Dr. Jart, and our Korean friends tell us there is no actual Dr. Jart, so it is a made up name to help give the line some credibility. According to the company's English Web site, the brand is supposed to be the brainchild of multiple dermatologists as well as 21 "medical specialists." That's a lot of cooks for one product line, but as we've reported before, and as many of you know from experience, there are plenty of doctors' products that are terribly formulated and that come in bad packaging. All that really counts is whether or not you should give this line a closer look, despite the marketing claims

It didn't take much review to discover that there is nothing particularly medical or dermatologist-oriented about these products. The people behind Dr. Jart+ don't have access to any special ingredients other cosmetic companies can't use, and their products contain no unique ingredients that have any research showing that they improve skin. U.S. Sephora stores sell two BB cream options from Dr. Jart+; one of them is great and the other is lacking in too many areas to make it worth purchasing. But the question remains, should you purchase a BB cream at all? They are not must-have products, and most are far from being the "new idea in skin care" they're made out to be. Essentially, whether they're called BB creams, Blemish Balms, or Beauty Balms, all of these products are little more than tinted moisturizers with sunscreen. Some include a helpful amount of beneficial ingredients like antioxidants or skin-lightening agents (vitamin C, arbutin) to improve brown spots. Such discolorations are considered a blemish in Asian cultures, but that's the only distinguishing feature. Compared with standard tinted moisturizers, BB creams typically provide slightly to moderately more coverage. In that sense, they fall between tinted moisturizers and foundations, but many BB creams go on sheer also; so, ultimately, it comes down to the individual products. If you're happily using a tinted moisturizer with sunscreen, there's no reason to forgo it in favor of a BB cream, but there's no harm in testing them out to see if you prefer their effect. Most won't notice much difference between them and a tinted moisturizer.

For more information about Dr. Jart+, visit http://www.drjart.co.kr/global/eng/.

Note: The company does not publish a phone number on its Web site, which doesn't bode well for building consumer trust or obtaining any help from customer service, so buyer beware.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Dr. Jart+ At-a-Glance

Strengths: The BB creams (Beauty Balms) provide broad-spectrum sun protection and are fragrance-free.

Weaknesses: Expensive; BB creams are little more than tinted moisturizers with sunscreen; the masks are gimmicky and minimally helpful for skin.

Dr. Jart+ is a line of skin-care products based in Korea. Its most popular products are the Beauty Balms, known in the United States as BB creams. Before we discuss this brand's contribution to the BB cream craze, we want to state that at this time we are reviewing only the Dr. Jart+ products that are available at U.S. Sephora stores. If you visit the Korean Dr. Jart+ Web site, you'll see several other skin-care products are offered. We might review those in the future, but it's clear that the questions we've received about this brand have to do with the BB creams.

No information is available about an actual Dr. Jart, and our Korean friends tell us there is no actual Dr. Jart, so it is a made up name to help give the line some credibility. According to the company's English Web site, the brand is supposed to be the brainchild of multiple dermatologists as well as 21 "medical specialists." That's a lot of cooks for one product line, but as we've reported before, and as many of you know from experience, there are plenty of doctors' products that are terribly formulated and that come in bad packaging. All that really counts is whether or not you should give this line a closer look, despite the marketing claims

It didn't take much review to discover that there is nothing particularly medical or dermatologist-oriented about these products. The people behind Dr. Jart+ don't have access to any special ingredients other cosmetic companies can't use, and their products contain no unique ingredients that have any research showing that they improve skin. U.S. Sephora stores sell two BB cream options from Dr. Jart+; one of them is great and the other is lacking in too many areas to make it worth purchasing. But the question remains, should you purchase a BB cream at all? They are not must-have products, and most are far from being the "new idea in skin care" they're made out to be. Essentially, whether they're called BB creams, Blemish Balms, or Beauty Balms, all of these products are little more than tinted moisturizers with sunscreen. Some include a helpful amount of beneficial ingredients like antioxidants or skin-lightening agents (vitamin C, arbutin) to improve brown spots. Such discolorations are considered a blemish in Asian cultures, but that's the only distinguishing feature. Compared with standard tinted moisturizers, BB creams typically provide slightly to moderately more coverage. In that sense, they fall between tinted moisturizers and foundations, but many BB creams go on sheer also; so, ultimately, it comes down to the individual products. If you're happily using a tinted moisturizer with sunscreen, there's no reason to forgo it in favor of a BB cream, but there's no harm in testing them out to see if you prefer their effect. Most won't notice much difference between them and a tinted moisturizer.

For more information about Dr. Jart+, visit http://www.drjart.co.kr/global/eng/.

Note: The company does not publish a phone number on its Web site, which doesn't bode well for building consumer trust or obtaining any help from customer service, so buyer beware.