07.20.2016
1
Every Sun Day UV Sunscreen Broad Spectrum SPF 50
1.7 fl. oz. for $34
Expert Rating
Community Rating (0)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:07.20.2016
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

Every Sun Day UV Sunscreen Broad Spectrum SPF 50 provides reliable sun protection with a lightweight, elegant texture and radiant-glow finish. This texture is wonderful for normal to combination or slightly dry skin, but we can't recommend it with enthusiasm due to the amount of fragrance it contains.

Its mix of lavender oil (see the More Info section below), rose and juniper oils lingers on skin. Though some may not mind a little fragrance in their skincare products, this reviewer felt it went above and beyond that for an unpleasant experience.

Though the finish is sublime and broad spectrum sun protection is assured, there are plenty of alternatives (even within Dr. Jart's line) that do not contain the degree of fragrance Every Sun Day UV Sunscreen Broad Spectrum SPF 50 does. See our top recommendations here.

Pros:
  • Provides broad spectrum sun protection.
  • Adds a radiant glow to skin.
  • Provides light, non-greasy hydration.
Cons:
  • Its fragrant oil blend lingers and poses a risk of irritating skin.
More Info:

Lavender Oil: In-vitro research indicates that components of lavender, specifically linalool and linalyl acetate, can be cytotoxic, which means that topical application of as little a concentration as 0.25% causes cell death (Cell Proliferation, June 2004). This study was conducted on endothelial cells, which are cells that line blood pathways in the body and play a critical role in the inflammatory process of skin.

As linalool and linalyl acetate are both rapidly absorbed by skin and can be detected within blood cells in less than 20 minutes, endothelial cells are an ideal choice for such a test (Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, 1992). The results of this research also demonstrated that lavender has a damaging effect on fibroblasts, which are cells that produce collagen.

The fragrance constituents in lavender oil, linalool and linalyl acetate, oxidize when exposed to air, and in this process their potential for causing an allergic reaction is increased (Contact Dermatitis, 2008).

If you're wondering why lavender oil doesn't appear to be problematic for you, it's because research has demonstrated that you don't always need to see it or feel it happening for your skin to suffer damage (Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, 2008).

How We Rate Sunscreens vs. Daytime Moisturizers with SPF: Sunscreens are judged based upon whether they provide broad-spectrum sun protection, their SPF rating, potential for irritation, packaging and aesthetics. Additional qualities that push it into four or five star (best-rated) category are the inclusion of meaningful amounts of repairing, cell communicating or antioxidant ingredients as well as unique characteristics that enhance its wearability.

"Sunscreens" are differentiated from "Daytime Moisturizers with SPF" by three primary qualities.

• They must be marketed as "sunscreens" only by the brand.

• They lack specific anti-aging claims.

• Their size is greater than 2 ounces, unless it is specifically called out as a sunscreen for the face and is not positioned as a facial/daytime moisturizer with SPF.

For more detail on how we rate this category of products, see the Best Sunscreens section of Beautypedia.

Community Reviews
Claims
A sunscreen that offers powerful UV defense, plus moisturizing and soothing benefits. This sunscreen protects against UV rays while soothing and protecting sun-irritated skin. The formula contains moisturizing ingredients, which help prevent dryness without leaving the skin feeling sticky or hindering makeup application. The subtle, light pink-beige color helps brighten and color correct the skin tone for a brighter and healthier look.
Ingredients

Active Ingredients: Zinc Oxide 12.660%, Octinoxate 6.800%, Octisalate 4.500%, Titanium Dioxide 2.490%. Inactive Ingredients: Water, Cyclopentasiloxane, Dipropylene Glycol, Dicaprylyl Carbonate, Butyloctyl Salicylate, PEG-10 Dimethicone, Caprylyl Methicone, Glycerin, Disteardimonium Hectorite, Dimethicone, Viscum Album (Mistletoe) Leaf Extract, Centella Asiatica Extract, Portulaca Oleracea Extract, Magnesium Sulfate, Mica, Silica, Phenoxyethanol, Polymethylsilsesquioxane, Aluminum Hydroxide, Triethoxycaprylylsilane, Dimethicone/Vinyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Aluminum Stearate, Caprylyl Glycol, Polyclyceryl-6 Polyricinoleate, Vinyl Dimethicone/Methicone Silsesquioxane Crosspolymer, Microcrystalline Cellulose, Glyceryl Caprylate, Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender) Oil, Rose Flower Oil, Polyurethane-11, Juniperus Mexicana Oil, Cellulose Gum, Sodium Hyaluronate, Aminopropyl Dimethicone, Calendula Officinalis Flower Extract, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Extract, Althaea Rosea Flower Extract, Iron Oxides

Brand Overview

Dr. Jart+ At-a-Glance

Strengths: The BB creams (Beauty Balms) provide broad-spectrum sun protection and are fragrance-free.

Weaknesses: Expensive; BB creams are little more than tinted moisturizers with sunscreen; the masks are gimmicky and minimally helpful for skin.

Dr. Jart+ is a line of skin-care products based in Korea. Its most popular products are the Beauty Balms, known in the United States as BB creams. Before we discuss this brand's contribution to the BB cream craze, we want to state that at this time we are reviewing only the Dr. Jart+ products that are available at U.S. Sephora stores. If you visit the Korean Dr. Jart+ Web site, you'll see several other skin-care products are offered. We might review those in the future, but it's clear that the questions we've received about this brand have to do with the BB creams.

No information is available about an actual Dr. Jart, and our Korean friends tell us there is no actual Dr. Jart, so it is a made up name to help give the line some credibility. According to the company's English Web site, the brand is supposed to be the brainchild of multiple dermatologists as well as 21 "medical specialists." That's a lot of cooks for one product line, but as we've reported before, and as many of you know from experience, there are plenty of doctors' products that are terribly formulated and that come in bad packaging. All that really counts is whether or not you should give this line a closer look, despite the marketing claims

It didn't take much review to discover that there is nothing particularly medical or dermatologist-oriented about these products. The people behind Dr. Jart+ don't have access to any special ingredients other cosmetic companies can't use, and their products contain no unique ingredients that have any research showing that they improve skin. U.S. Sephora stores sell two BB cream options from Dr. Jart+; one of them is great and the other is lacking in too many areas to make it worth purchasing. But the question remains, should you purchase a BB cream at all? They are not must-have products, and most are far from being the "new idea in skin care" they're made out to be. Essentially, whether they're called BB creams, Blemish Balms, or Beauty Balms, all of these products are little more than tinted moisturizers with sunscreen. Some include a helpful amount of beneficial ingredients like antioxidants or skin-lightening agents (vitamin C, arbutin) to improve brown spots. Such discolorations are considered a blemish in Asian cultures, but that's the only distinguishing feature. Compared with standard tinted moisturizers, BB creams typically provide slightly to moderately more coverage. In that sense, they fall between tinted moisturizers and foundations, but many BB creams go on sheer also; so, ultimately, it comes down to the individual products. If you're happily using a tinted moisturizer with sunscreen, there's no reason to forgo it in favor of a BB cream, but there's no harm in testing them out to see if you prefer their effect. Most won't notice much difference between them and a tinted moisturizer.

For more information about Dr. Jart+, visit http://www.drjart.co.kr/global/eng/.

Note: The company does not publish a phone number on its Web site, which doesn't bode well for building consumer trust or obtaining any help from customer service, so buyer beware.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Dr. Jart+ At-a-Glance

Strengths: The BB creams (Beauty Balms) provide broad-spectrum sun protection and are fragrance-free.

Weaknesses: Expensive; BB creams are little more than tinted moisturizers with sunscreen; the masks are gimmicky and minimally helpful for skin.

Dr. Jart+ is a line of skin-care products based in Korea. Its most popular products are the Beauty Balms, known in the United States as BB creams. Before we discuss this brand's contribution to the BB cream craze, we want to state that at this time we are reviewing only the Dr. Jart+ products that are available at U.S. Sephora stores. If you visit the Korean Dr. Jart+ Web site, you'll see several other skin-care products are offered. We might review those in the future, but it's clear that the questions we've received about this brand have to do with the BB creams.

No information is available about an actual Dr. Jart, and our Korean friends tell us there is no actual Dr. Jart, so it is a made up name to help give the line some credibility. According to the company's English Web site, the brand is supposed to be the brainchild of multiple dermatologists as well as 21 "medical specialists." That's a lot of cooks for one product line, but as we've reported before, and as many of you know from experience, there are plenty of doctors' products that are terribly formulated and that come in bad packaging. All that really counts is whether or not you should give this line a closer look, despite the marketing claims

It didn't take much review to discover that there is nothing particularly medical or dermatologist-oriented about these products. The people behind Dr. Jart+ don't have access to any special ingredients other cosmetic companies can't use, and their products contain no unique ingredients that have any research showing that they improve skin. U.S. Sephora stores sell two BB cream options from Dr. Jart+; one of them is great and the other is lacking in too many areas to make it worth purchasing. But the question remains, should you purchase a BB cream at all? They are not must-have products, and most are far from being the "new idea in skin care" they're made out to be. Essentially, whether they're called BB creams, Blemish Balms, or Beauty Balms, all of these products are little more than tinted moisturizers with sunscreen. Some include a helpful amount of beneficial ingredients like antioxidants or skin-lightening agents (vitamin C, arbutin) to improve brown spots. Such discolorations are considered a blemish in Asian cultures, but that's the only distinguishing feature. Compared with standard tinted moisturizers, BB creams typically provide slightly to moderately more coverage. In that sense, they fall between tinted moisturizers and foundations, but many BB creams go on sheer also; so, ultimately, it comes down to the individual products. If you're happily using a tinted moisturizer with sunscreen, there's no reason to forgo it in favor of a BB cream, but there's no harm in testing them out to see if you prefer their effect. Most won't notice much difference between them and a tinted moisturizer.

For more information about Dr. Jart+, visit http://www.drjart.co.kr/global/eng/.

Note: The company does not publish a phone number on its Web site, which doesn't bode well for building consumer trust or obtaining any help from customer service, so buyer beware.