Laszlo Blue Firmarine Night Cream

Price:
$225 - 1.7 fl. oz.
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Category:
Skin Care > Moisturizers (Daytime and Nighttime) > Moisturizer without Sunscreen
Last Updated:
3/13/2013
Jar Packaging:
Yes
Tested On Animals:
No

This moisturizer is absolutely overpriced for what you get, especially when you consider that most of the intriguing ingredients are listed after the preservative and fragrance; that is, the good stuff is not present in abundance! Also, because this is packaged in a jar, the key ingredients won't remain stable once this is opened (see More Info for details). Cinching the three-strikes-you're-out rule is the amount of fragrance, which is unusually high, and fragrance isn't skin care (see More Info). One more strike: The blue color comes from a blue synthetic dye ingredient, and dyes aren't skin care any more than fragrance is skin care.

While some of the ingredients in this moisturizer offer some amount of environmental repair, it doesn't compare well with the best moisturizers out there. In the end, this ends up being a classic example of why—in the world of skin care—expensive doesn't mean better.

Pros:
  • Rich texture should please those with dry to very dry skin.
Cons:
  • Outrageously expensive. You're not getting your money's worth.
  • Jar packaging won't keep key ingredients stable once opened.
  • Overly fragrant.
  • Many of the most intriguing ingredients are listed after the preservative and fragrance.
  • The blue color comes from a synthetic dye ingredient that can pose a risk of irritation.
More Info:

Why Jar Packaging is a Problem: The fact that it's packaged in a jar means the beneficial ingredients won't remain stable once it is opened. All plant extracts, vitamins, antioxidants, and other state-of-the-art ingredients break down in the presence of air, so once a jar is opened and lets the air in, these important ingredients begin to deteriorate. Jars also are unsanitary because you're dipping your fingers into them with each use, adding bacteria, which further deteriorate the beneficial ingredients (Sources: Free Radical Biology and Medicine, September 2007, pages 818–829; Ageing Research Reviews, December 2007, pages 271–288; Dermatologic Therapy, September-October 2007, pages 314–321; International Journal of Pharmaceutics, June 12, 2005, pages 197–203; Pharmaceutical Development and Technology, January 2002, pages 1–32; International Society for Horticultural Science, www.actahort.org/members/showpdf?booknrarnr=778_5; Beautypackaging.com, and www.beautypackaging.com/articles/2007/03/airless-packaging.php).

Why Using Fragrant Skin-Care Products is a Problem: Daily use of products that contain a high amount of fragrance, whether the fragrant ingredients are synthetic or natural, causes chronic irritation that can damage healthy collagen production, lead to or worsen dryness, and impair your skin's ability to heal. Fragrance-free is the best way to go for all skin types. If fragrance in your skin-care products is important to you, it should be a very low amount to minimize the risk to your skin (Sources: Inflammation Research, December 2008, pages 558–563; Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, June 2008, pages 124–135, and November-December 2000, pages 358–371; Journal of Investigative Dermatology, April 2008, pages 15–19; Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, March 2008, pages 78–82; Mechanisms of Ageing and Development, January 2007, pages 92–105; and British Journal of Dermatology, December 2005, pages S13–S22).

Moisturize skin from the cellular level with the power of Spirulina Maxima. Our firming night cream encourages collagen growth, repairs environmental damage and evens skin texture to visibly firm the skins appearance.

Water, Glycerin, Coco-Caprylate/Caprate, Butylene Glycol, Hydrogenated Coconut Oil, PEG-8, Dicaprylyl Ether, Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea Butter), Hydroxystearic/Linolenic/Oleic Polyglycerides, Macadamia Integrifolia Seed Oil, Imperata Cylindrica Root Extract, Cetyl Alcohol, Sodium Polyacrylate, Phenoxyethanol, Hydroxyethyl Acrylate/Sodium Acryloyldimethyl Taurate Copolymer, Hydrogenated Polydecene, Glyceryl Stearate, Steareth-21, Squalane, Ethylhexylglycerin, Parfum (Fragrance), Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Xanthan Gum, Tocopherol, Polysorbate-60, Trideceth-6, Disodium EDTA, Ribes Nigrum (Black Currant) Seed Oil, Buteth-3, Sodium Benzotriazolyl Butylphenyl Sulfonate, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Hexyl Cinnamal, Glycine Soja (Soybean) Oil, Caprylyl Glycol, Limonene, Pentylene Glycol, Salicornia Herbacea Extract, Sodium Hyaluronate, Linalool, Carbomer, Cetraria Islandica Extract, Geraniol, Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer, 3-Aminopropane Sulfonic Acid, Calcium Hydroxymethionine, Hydroxyethylcellulose, Spirulina Platensis Extract, Tetradecyl Aminobutyroylvalylaminobutyric Urea Trifluoroacetate, Tributyl Citrate, Citral, Citronellol, Palmitoyl Dipeptide-5 Diaminobutyroyl Hydroxythreonine, Palmitoyl Dipeptide-5 Diaminohydroxybutyrate, Ci 42090 (Blue 1), Magnesium Chloride, Rosmarinus Officinalis (Rosemary) Leaf Extract

According to the company's brochure, Dr. Erno Laszlo, a Hungarian dermatologist, was "the first to combine the exact science of his profession with the art of cosmetology" using "precisely diagnosed treatments dispensed with a doctor's touch." He treated Hungarian royalty, women whose lack of beautiful skin was apparently enough to get them shot in the face by potential suitors (no kidding)—until Laszlo saved the day with his revolutionary products. We admit that that's great copy, but there are rumors that he was never a medical doctor in Hungary or anywhere else in Europe, and he was certainly never licensed to practice medicine in the United States. Medical status aside, the claims and "story" behind these products are just another verse in the litany of hyperbole the cosmetics industry is famous for.

In his time (1920s through the 1930s), Laszlo's notoriety was built on "prescribing" skin-care regimens for wealthy women who could afford to "succumb to the 'Laszlo Ritual' of daily skin care." The ritual included regimented splashing of the face with extremely hot water before and after washing with bar soap. Today's Laszlo ritual talks of harnessing the power of water not only to cleanse skin but also to tone, firm, hydrate, clear, and energize skin. Amazing isn't it? If water alone and a certain splashing technique with traditional bar soap can take care of skin, then what's the point of Laszlo's profusion of (mostly poor) products? Why not just offer some soap and a tip sheet on how to splash most effectively, and let the water perform the miracles the company claims it can? If you think this sounds as ridiculous as we do, imagine trying to explain it to customers without backing away sheepishly. While neighboring cosmetics counters extol advanced formulas claiming to work like Botox or speak of their potent, patented cosmeceutical ingredients, Laszlo's team is going on and on about splashing skin with water and the "clocking system" they use to determine your skin type (a system that is more complicated than helpful).

Looking at historical background is one thing, but the real problem with legendary or ancient skin-care routines is that new research more often than not negates what we once thought to be true. After all, in Laszlo's heyday, no one knew about sun damage or the need for exfoliation, or that hot water can hurt skin and cause surfaced capillaries. Water-soluble cleansers weren't around, no one knew the connection between antioxidants and skin care, elegant sunscreens didn't exist, and Laszlo clearly didn't know that soap is too irritating and that irritation is a problem for skin (it's one of the major causes of collagen destruction). Plus, alkaline substances (that's what soap contains) have research showing they can increase the bacterial content in skin and damage the skin's healing process. With today's gentle cleansing options, there is no need to subject skin to the harshness of soap, regardless of how oily it is.

Further, anyone with any skin type who adheres to routine use of Laszlo's products is only setting themselves up for trouble, whether it's persistent irritation or a dry, tight feeling that will have you reaching for a moisturizer in desperation (and possibly making oily or breakout-prone areas worse as a result). There are some reliable, well-formulated products in this line, but following Laszlo's regimented routine is a path to skin irritation and dryness—and that's not the way to "worship your skin."

For more information about Erno Laszlo, call (888) 352-7956 or visit www.ernolaszlo.com.

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About the Experts

Paula Begoun is the best-selling author of 20 books on skin care and makeup. She is known worldwide as the Cosmetics Cop and creator of Paula's Choice. Paula's expertise has led to hundreds of appearances on national and international television including:

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The Paula's Choice Research Team is dedicated to helping you find the absolute best products for your skin, using research-based criteria to review beauty products from an honest, balanced perspective. Each member of the team was personally trained by Paula herself.

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