03.13.2013
0
0
Luminous Dual Phase Vitamin C Peel
Rating
$95
Category:Skin Care > Scrubs > Scrubs
Last Updated:03.13.2013
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:No
Review Overview

This two-step kit features a peel product and an activator product. You begin the process by applying Vibran C Peel Phase I, a baking soda–based scrub that contains some emollients and plant oils to buffer the scrubbing process. You’re directed to massage this over your face for up to three minutes, but please don’t do it for that long because that is overkill for any skin type. Then you are instructed to apply the Vibran C Activator Phase II over that before rinsing. This water-based, gel-like solution has an acidic pH, and when mixed with the alkaline pH of the baking soda–loaded Phase I, a chemical reaction that generates heat occurs. You’ll feel a fairly intense warming sensation, and after another minute passes you’re instructed to rinse the whole thing off. All the while, very little vitamin C is being delivered to your skin, and the conflicting pH levels of the two phases don’t allow it to work very well. Moreover, the lengthy amount of time you’re supposed to scrub is just too painful. This works best as a traditional topical scrub, but what an expensive way to obtain smoother skin! You should consider an inexpensive scrub from the drugstore (or just a washcloth for that matter) along with a well-formulated vitamin C serum. For additional details on plastic microbeads in cosmetics, see the More Info section below.

More Info:

Plastic Microbeads in Cosmetics: This product contains polyethylene beads, which is an ingredient that has come under controversy in the recent past. In December of 2013, research published in the peer-reviewed journal, Marine Pollution Bulletin demonstrated that although polyurethane beads are non-toxic to humans, they are not filtered during sewage treatment and are accumulating in waterways. This means the beads have the potential to negatively affect marine wildlife who mistakenly consume them (Marine Pollution Bulletin, 2013).

Additional research published in December of 2013 demonstrated that polyurethane beads have the potential to absorb pollutants while in waterways. This research was conducted to establish the potential of absorption, however, and was not conducted using samples from actual waterways (Cell, 2013).

Beautypedia does not take an ideological stance in reviewing skincare products; rather, our reviews are based upon each product's potential harm or benefit to skin contingent upon what independent peer-reviewed scientific research has demonstrated. On issues like polyethylene beads in cosmetics or animal testing, we present the facts without judgment so that you may make your own decision whether or not this product is right for you.

Claims

This two-phase peel polishes and smoothes the complexion, refining dull skin and encouraging collagen production for immediate radiance. Results are visible as the skin is rejuvenated, softened and moisturized. Age-fighting antioxidants and moisturizing oils help protect, nourish and repair the skin.

Ingredients

Vibran C Peel Phase I: PEG-8, Sodium Bicarbonate, Propylene Glycol, Glyceryl Stearate Se, Silica, Steareth-20, Polyethylene, Tocopheryl Acetate, Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Daucus Carota Sativa (Carrot) Seed Oil, Daucus Carota Sativa (Carrot) Root Extract, Fragrance, Beta-Carotene, Limonene Vibran C Activator Phase II: Water, Linoleamidopropyl PG-Dimonium Chloride Phosphate,, Polyquaternium-10, Hydroxyethylcellulose, Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate, Polysorbate 20, PEG-40 Hydrogenated Castor Oil, Trideceth-9, Sodium Hydroxide, Disodium EDTA, Lactic Acid, Fragrance, Potassium Sorbate, Phenoxyethanol, Sodium Dehydroacetate, Limonene

Brand Overview

Erno Laszlo At-A-Glance

Strengths: One good toner; some good moisturizers; pH-correct AHA product; tinted moisturizer with sunscreen; workable concealer, powders, and powder blush.

Weaknesses: Expensive; the majority of products contain one or more considerably irritating ingredients; basic skin-care regimen revolves around using drying bar soap and alcohol-laden toners; the TranspHuse line; jar packaging.

According to the company's brochure, Dr. Erno Laszlo, a Hungarian dermatologist, was "the first to combine the exact science of his profession with the art of cosmetology" using "precisely diagnosed treatments dispensed with a doctor's touch." He treated Hungarian royalty, women whose lack of beautiful skin was apparently enough to get them shot in the face by potential suitors (no kidding)—until Laszlo saved the day with his revolutionary products. We admit that that's great copy, but there are rumors that he was never a medical doctor in Hungary or anywhere else in Europe, and he was certainly never licensed to practice medicine in the United States. Medical status aside, the claims and "story" behind these products are just another verse in the litany of hyperbole the cosmetics industry is famous for.

In his time (1920s through the 1930s), Laszlo's notoriety was built on "prescribing" skin-care regimens for wealthy women who could afford to "succumb to the 'Laszlo Ritual' of daily skin care." The ritual included regimented splashing of the face with extremely hot water before and after washing with bar soap. Today's Laszlo ritual talks of harnessing the power of water not only to cleanse skin but also to tone, firm, hydrate, clear, and energize skin. Amazing isn't it? If water alone and a certain splashing technique with traditional bar soap can take care of skin, then what's the point of Laszlo's profusion of (mostly poor) products? Why not just offer some soap and a tip sheet on how to splash most effectively, and let the water perform the miracles the company claims it can? If you think this sounds as ridiculous as we do, imagine trying to explain it to customers without backing away sheepishly. While neighboring cosmetics counters extol advanced formulas claiming to work like Botox or speak of their potent, patented cosmeceutical ingredients, Laszlo's team is going on and on about splashing skin with water and the "clocking system" they use to determine your skin type (a system that is more complicated than helpful).

Looking at historical background is one thing, but the real problem with legendary or ancient skin-care routines is that new research more often than not negates what we once thought to be true. After all, in Laszlo's heyday, no one knew about sun damage or the need for exfoliation, or that hot water can hurt skin and cause surfaced capillaries. Water-soluble cleansers weren't around, no one knew the connection between antioxidants and skin care, elegant sunscreens didn't exist, and Laszlo clearly didn't know that soap is too irritating and that irritation is a problem for skin (it's one of the major causes of collagen destruction). Plus, alkaline substances (that's what soap contains) have research showing they can increase the bacterial content in skin and damage the skin's healing process. With today's gentle cleansing options, there is no need to subject skin to the harshness of soap, regardless of how oily it is.

Further, anyone with any skin type who adheres to routine use of Laszlo's products is only setting themselves up for trouble, whether it's persistent irritation or a dry, tight feeling that will have you reaching for a moisturizer in desperation (and possibly making oily or breakout-prone areas worse as a result). There are some reliable, well-formulated products in this line, but following Laszlo's regimented routine is a path to skin irritation and dryness—and that's not the way to "worship your skin."

For more information about Erno Laszlo, call (888) 352-7956 or visit www.ernolaszlo.com.

About the Experts

The new Beautypedia Team proudly and unequivocally maintains the commitment to help you find the best products possible for your skin. We do this by relentlessly pursuing and relying on published scientific research so you will have unbiased information on what works and what doesn't-and the sneaky ways you could be making your skin worse, not better!


The Beautypedia Team reviews all products using the same research, criteria, and objectivity, whether the product being reviewed is from Paula's Choice or another brand.

Member Comments

No members have written a review yet. Be the first!

WRITE A COMMENT
Enter a title for your review
 
First Name, Last Initial
Optional
Email Address
 
How would you rate this product on the following:
Results
Value
Recommend
     
     
     
Review
500 characters left
 
SUBMIT
CANCEL

Terms of Use

585632-IIS4 v1.0.0.394 5/29/2015 1:33:12 PM