08.26.2015
1853
Calming Dry Skin Body Wash
8.4 fl. oz. for $8.79
Expert Rating
Community Rating (11)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:08.26.2015
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

Without question, this is an innovative body wash for those with dry to very dry or eczema-prone, itchy skin. Labeling it a shower oil is correct, because although this has cleansing ingredients, it does not look or behave like a typical body wash. It is fluid and, being oil-based, a bit greasy, though mixing it with water does produce a low-foaming creamy lather that rinses surprisingly well. True to its claim, your skin will be left noticeably soft and smooth, though anyone with bothersome dry skin will still need to follow up with a moisturizer after you shower. Caution: Using this product may make your bathtub or shower floor slippery. Be sure to check that and clean the floor accordingly between uses. This product is not recommended for oily or blemish-prone skin.

Community Reviews
Claims

Eucerin Calming Body Wash is a mild cleanser with the skin-soothing benefits of natural omega oils to relieve and calm dry, itchy skin. This unique formulation does more than cleanse, it helps improve the condition of your skin. Soap-free and fragrance-free, Calming Body Wash doesn't strip away skin's essential moisture and is enriched with natural omega oils to protect and soothe. At the end of your shower, your skin will feel comfortable and smooth.

Ingredients

Glycine Soja (Soybean) Oil, Ricinus Communis (Castor) Seed Oil, Laureth-4, MIPA-Laureth Sulfate, Poloxamer 101, Laureth-9, Propylene Glycol, Water, Propyl Gallate, BHT.

Brand Overview

Eucerin At-A-Glance

Strengths: Inexpensive and widely distributed; fragrance-free cleansers; some good body washes and body moisturizers; widely available.

Weaknesses: Anti-redness products that added questionable ingredients instead of increasing the anti-inflammatory agents; nothing for acne-prone skin; jar packaging; some standard body lotions that are OK for dry skin but "OK" isn't good enough.

This drugstore staple line claims to be dermatologist-preferred skin care, but any dermatologist who recommends this line in its entirety without reservation needs a crash course in what skin really needs to be protected and look its best.

There are some basic products that a dermatologist would want to consider, but Eucerin falls short in products to address acne. Further, their latest facial skincare products aren't keeping pace with what industry frontrunners are doing in an effort to create elegant, effective products. For example, serums from Olay, Neutrogena, and Aveeno have much more interesting formulations, while moisturizers from many other drugstore lines (including Nivea, which is owned by Eucerin parent company Beiersdorf) include a greater complement of antioxidants and ingredients that mimic the structure and function of healthy skin. Eucerin is making some strides here, though, which is an encouraging sign.

A major pro for this line is that all of the products are fragrance-free. Although that's helpful for all skin types, it certainly isn't compelling enough for dermatologists to green-light this line without cautions about which products to avoid.

For more information about Eucerin, call (800) 227-4703 or visit www.eucerin.com.

About the Experts

The new Beautypedia Team proudly and unequivocally maintains the commitment to help you find the best products possible for your skin. We do this by relentlessly pursuing and relying on published scientific research so you will have unbiased information on what works and what doesn't-and the sneaky ways you could be making your skin worse, not better!


The Beautypedia Team reviews all products using the same research, criteria, and objectivity, whether the product being reviewed is from Paula's Choice or another brand.

See all reviews for this brand

Eucerin At-A-Glance

Strengths: Inexpensive and widely distributed; fragrance-free cleansers; some good body washes and body moisturizers; widely available.

Weaknesses: Anti-redness products that added questionable ingredients instead of increasing the anti-inflammatory agents; nothing for acne-prone skin; jar packaging; some standard body lotions that are OK for dry skin but "OK" isn't good enough.

This drugstore staple line claims to be dermatologist-preferred skin care, but any dermatologist who recommends this line in its entirety without reservation needs a crash course in what skin really needs to be protected and look its best.

There are some basic products that a dermatologist would want to consider, but Eucerin falls short in products to address acne. Further, their latest facial skincare products aren't keeping pace with what industry frontrunners are doing in an effort to create elegant, effective products. For example, serums from Olay, Neutrogena, and Aveeno have much more interesting formulations, while moisturizers from many other drugstore lines (including Nivea, which is owned by Eucerin parent company Beiersdorf) include a greater complement of antioxidants and ingredients that mimic the structure and function of healthy skin. Eucerin is making some strides here, though, which is an encouraging sign.

A major pro for this line is that all of the products are fragrance-free. Although that's helpful for all skin types, it certainly isn't compelling enough for dermatologists to green-light this line without cautions about which products to avoid.

For more information about Eucerin, call (800) 227-4703 or visit www.eucerin.com.