01.22.2015
1
Supercleanse Daily Clearing Cleanser
5 fl. oz. for $39
Expert Rating
Community Rating (5)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:01.22.2015
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

Is “Supercleanse” GlamGlow’s foray into the popular juice cleanse market? No; Supercleanse Daily Clearing Cleanser is the first facial cleanser from the mask-centric GlamGlow brand and the offspring of their facial mask Super-Mud Clearing Treatment. Unfortunately, like Super-Mud mask, Supercleanse contains a problematic mix of irritating ingredients that isn’t recommended for anyone, much less those looking to treat oily skin or acne breakouts.

Packaged in a pump-style container, Supercleanse Daily Clearing Cleanser has a thick, dark grey texture—undoubtedly designed to complement the similar appearance of their Super-Mud mask. The high amount of clay ingredients (kaolin and magnesium aluminum silicate) present give this cleanser a grainy feel on skin—but in a rinse-off formula, their oil-absorbing potential is lost.

Aesthetics aside, their choice of detergent agent (sodium c14-16 olefin sulfonate) is a disappointment. This ingredient readily foams on contact with water (as is the case in here), but it’s an overly potent cleansing ingredient that’s far too harsh and drying for skin (Cosmetic Ingredient Review, 2013).

Supercleanse also contains a super-fragrant mix of plant extracts—peppermint oil and eucalyptus leaf powder among them. While the “tingling” effect of eucalyptus and peppermint can be pleasing to some, these fragrance ingredients are big trouble for their potential to irritate skin—and irritation can cause an increase in oil production and breakouts. See the More Info section for additional details.

While the marketing campaign and flashy packaging for GlamGlow products is certainly seductive, their cleanser can’t live up to its lofty claims to treat all manner of skin imperfections. In fact, the only “clearing” this cleanser is capable of is about $40 from your bank account. We’d recommend skipping it in favor of the far better choices recommended in our Best Cleansers (Including Cleansing Cloths) section.

Note: Although this clay-based cleanser contains the AHA ingredients glycolic and lactic acids, the amounts of each are too low to exfoliate, plus this product’s pH is outside the range those ingredients need to remove dead skin cells.

Pros:
  • None.
Cons:
  • Potently fragrant.
  • Irritation from eucalyptus extract and peppermint oil can worsen breakouts and oily skin.
  • Can’t live up to its skin-clearing promises.
  • Expensive for what you get.

More Info:

Irritation's Connection to Oily Skin & Breakouts:Inflammation in skin is usually related to external factors such as irritation that damages the skin’s barrier in numerous ways, whether you can see the reaction or not. When irritation on the surface of skin happens it activates specific chemicals called neuropeptides in the brain (Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 2007). Those substances are specifically the kind that regulates the hormonal system of the body.

When this happens, it leads to the formation of inflammatory chemicals directly in the oil gland. These inflammatory chemicals trigger an increase in oil production, which can increase the size of the pore, and the likelihood of acne—the more inflammation that occurs, the worse the risk (European Journal of Dermatology, 2002 & Dermatology, 2003).

Bottom line: Inflammation and its resulting irritation, whether internal or external (for this discussion externally it would be due to the use of irritating ingredients, hot water, overusing scrubs, etc.), is practically a guarantee you will see excess production of oil, larger pores and more acne breakouts (Experimental Dermatology, 2009 & Dermato-Endocrinology, 2011).

That’s reason enough to avoid products with irritating ingredients, which often come in the form of fragrance including the misnamed “essential” oils.

Community Reviews
Claims

Based on the top selling SUPERMUD Clearing Treatment, SUPERCLEANSE™ is the natural next step in the SUPER family for problematic skin. The revolutionary daily cleanser transforms from mud into a foaming lather to dissolve oil and makeup—rinsing away pore-clogging debris and impurities. It’s designed to reduce the appearance of skin imperfections and create a mattified, super clear complexion.

Ingredients

Water, Sodium C14-16 Olefin Sulfonate, Kaolin, Magnesium Aluminum Silicate, Sodium Cocoamphoacetate, Nigella Sativa Seed Extract, Cetearyl Alcohol, Glyceryl Stearate, Glycerin, Carbon (Bamboo Charcoal), Propanediol, Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Licorice) Root Extract, Eucalyptus Globulus Leaf Powder, Mentha Piperita (Peppermint) Oil, Lactic Acid, Glycolic Acid, Cocamidopropyl Hydroxysultaine, Glyceryl Polyacrylate, Xanthan Gum, Fragrance, Linalool, Phenoxyethanol, Ethylhexylglycerin.

Brand Overview

GlamGlow At-A-Glance

Strengths: None, unfortunately. Well, their packaging is pretty.

Weaknesses: Despite the hype, GlamGlow does not have exceptional, or even mediocre, products worth considering. Their primary two masks are overpriced and offer a mix of ordinary clays, potent fragrance and irritating plant extracts with a few beneficial antioxidants present but they are rendered useless because of the jar packaging.

Created by the husband-and-wife team of Glenn and Shannon Dellimore, the Hollywood, California-based GlamGlow line consists of several masks and cleansers. Their marketing claims may have you thinking these masks are revolutionary skin-care treatments but they are not—not even slightly. GlamGlow also claims their masks are sought out by actors and celebrities for their ability to "tighten skin and shrink pores". The celebrity allure is a good one, as most of us want to know what the stars use to get or stay gorgeous, but celebrity cache alone isn't a great reason to try any product. A lot of celebrities do things that aren't good for them, like smoke, tan, or drink too much, and they make skin care and cosmetic surgery mistakes too.

But back to the masks. The GlamGlow masks contain fragrant essential oils, irritating plant extracts and ordinary clays (despite being named "French clay", in the world of skin-care formulation, clay is just clay and being from France is as special as a French fry is to a potato).

The reality behind the ingredients used in the GlamGlow line is much less interesting than the story would lead you to believe. Aside from the mix of clay and fragrance, their "hero ingredient" is the trade-named ingredient called "Teoxi", which is just green-tea extract. While green-tea extract is an excellent antioxidant, isn’t capable of the the skin perfecting, Benjamin Button-age-reversing results promised. As the body's largest organ, your skin is far too complex to have its anti-aging needs met by one antioxidant, however good it may be. But even if green-tea extract were as amazing as GlamGlow asserts, it won’t remain stable in the jar packaging the company chose for their masks.

Aside from "Teoxi", GlamGlow uses trade names instead of using the actual ingredient name in their marketing claims, on both the box and their website. You may think "Teoxi" sounds impressive, but you're only getting standard ingredients—their use of trade names simply makes the formula seem more intriguing than it really is. For example, their "Bio-Life-Cell-Science" technology claims to be an "Advanced Scientific Skincare" blend, but in reality it's just a mix of eucalyptus, peppermint, comfrey, ivy, marigold and other standard plant extracts. It would take some advanced scientific Photoshopping to get anti-wrinkle/anti-blemish results from this cast of ordinary problematic ingredients!

If you're interested in a clay mask for absorbing excess oil or helping clogged pores, there are many alternatives which easily beat GlamGlow for a fraction of the cost. There is nothing unique about the masks this line sells.

GlamGlow also makes exfoliating claims, but these don't live up to their promise for reasons discussed in each mask's reviews. You are better off using a soft washcloth with your cleanser for physical exfoliation—you will get virtually identical results and save your skin the irritation (plus spare your bank account the wasted money). If brighter, more even-toned skin is your goal, consider any of the well-formulated AHA/BHA exfoliants recommended in the Best Products section.

In the end, despite lots of hype, GlamGlow is a disappointment that isn't worth the expense and puts your skin at risk of irritation. If only a fraction of the marketing efforts behind the brand were put into formulating their products, they might have ended up with products truly deserving of celebrity accolades!

For more information about GlamGlow, email at info@glamglowmud.com or visit www.glamglowmud.com (there is no available phone number).

Note: As of January 2015, GlamGlow has been acquired by Estee Lauder.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

GlamGlow At-A-Glance

Strengths: None, unfortunately. Well, their packaging is pretty.

Weaknesses: Despite the hype, GlamGlow does not have exceptional, or even mediocre, products worth considering. Their primary two masks are overpriced and offer a mix of ordinary clays, potent fragrance and irritating plant extracts with a few beneficial antioxidants present but they are rendered useless because of the jar packaging.

Created by the husband-and-wife team of Glenn and Shannon Dellimore, the Hollywood, California-based GlamGlow line consists of several masks and cleansers. Their marketing claims may have you thinking these masks are revolutionary skin-care treatments but they are not—not even slightly. GlamGlow also claims their masks are sought out by actors and celebrities for their ability to "tighten skin and shrink pores". The celebrity allure is a good one, as most of us want to know what the stars use to get or stay gorgeous, but celebrity cache alone isn't a great reason to try any product. A lot of celebrities do things that aren't good for them, like smoke, tan, or drink too much, and they make skin care and cosmetic surgery mistakes too.

But back to the masks. The GlamGlow masks contain fragrant essential oils, irritating plant extracts and ordinary clays (despite being named "French clay", in the world of skin-care formulation, clay is just clay and being from France is as special as a French fry is to a potato).

The reality behind the ingredients used in the GlamGlow line is much less interesting than the story would lead you to believe. Aside from the mix of clay and fragrance, their "hero ingredient" is the trade-named ingredient called "Teoxi", which is just green-tea extract. While green-tea extract is an excellent antioxidant, isn’t capable of the the skin perfecting, Benjamin Button-age-reversing results promised. As the body's largest organ, your skin is far too complex to have its anti-aging needs met by one antioxidant, however good it may be. But even if green-tea extract were as amazing as GlamGlow asserts, it won’t remain stable in the jar packaging the company chose for their masks.

Aside from "Teoxi", GlamGlow uses trade names instead of using the actual ingredient name in their marketing claims, on both the box and their website. You may think "Teoxi" sounds impressive, but you're only getting standard ingredients—their use of trade names simply makes the formula seem more intriguing than it really is. For example, their "Bio-Life-Cell-Science" technology claims to be an "Advanced Scientific Skincare" blend, but in reality it's just a mix of eucalyptus, peppermint, comfrey, ivy, marigold and other standard plant extracts. It would take some advanced scientific Photoshopping to get anti-wrinkle/anti-blemish results from this cast of ordinary problematic ingredients!

If you're interested in a clay mask for absorbing excess oil or helping clogged pores, there are many alternatives which easily beat GlamGlow for a fraction of the cost. There is nothing unique about the masks this line sells.

GlamGlow also makes exfoliating claims, but these don't live up to their promise for reasons discussed in each mask's reviews. You are better off using a soft washcloth with your cleanser for physical exfoliation—you will get virtually identical results and save your skin the irritation (plus spare your bank account the wasted money). If brighter, more even-toned skin is your goal, consider any of the well-formulated AHA/BHA exfoliants recommended in the Best Products section.

In the end, despite lots of hype, GlamGlow is a disappointment that isn't worth the expense and puts your skin at risk of irritation. If only a fraction of the marketing efforts behind the brand were put into formulating their products, they might have ended up with products truly deserving of celebrity accolades!

For more information about GlamGlow, email at info@glamglowmud.com or visit www.glamglowmud.com (there is no available phone number).

Note: As of January 2015, GlamGlow has been acquired by Estee Lauder.