03.15.2013
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gloBrightening Polish
Rating
2 fl. oz. for $42
Category:Skin Care > Scrubs
Last Updated:03.15.2013
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:No
Review Overview

This obnoxiously expensive scrub that contains both plastic and jojoba beads to exfoliate skin contains far too many irritating ingredients to make it a bright proposition for anyone’s skin. For additional details on plastic microbeads in cosmetics, see the More Info section below. The second ingredient is witch hazel water, and although that’s not as bad for skin as pure witch hazel distillate (which has a higher alcohol content), gloMinerals added citrus, lavender, and peppermint oils, ingredients that irritate on contact with skin. Ouch! The beneficial ingredients, such as vitamin C and niacinamide, must penetrate into the skin to provide their benefit, and they are rinsed down the drain before they can do that.

More Info:

Plastic Microbeads in Cosmetics: This product contains polyethylene beads, which is an ingredient that has come under controversy in the recent past. In December of 2013, research published in the peer-reviewed journal, Marine Pollution Bulletin demonstrated that although polyurethane beads are non-toxic to humans, they are not filtered during sewage treatment and are accumulating in waterways. This means the beads have the potential to negatively affect marine wildlife who mistakenly consume them (Marine Pollution Bulletin, 2013).

Additional research published in December of 2013 demonstrated that polyurethane beads have the potential to absorb pollutants while in waterways. This research was conducted to establish the potential of absorption, however, and was not conducted using samples from actual waterways (Cell, 2013).

Beautypedia does not take an ideological stance in reviewing skincare products; rather, our reviews are based upon each product's potential harm or benefit to skin contingent upon what independent peer-reviewed scientific research has demonstrated. On issues like polyethylene beads in cosmetics or animal testing, we present the facts without judgment so that you may make your own decision whether or not this product is right for you.

Claims

gloBrightening Polish contains physical resurfacing agents to slough away dull epidermal cells and allow for deeper penetration of its natural brightening ingredients. This dual action helps to fade hyperpigmentation caused by acne and UV damage, delivering a smoother texture and more uniform tone.

Ingredients

Water, Hamamelis Virginiana (Witch Hazel) Water, Glycerin, Sodium Ascorbyl Phosphate, Jojoba Beads, Polyethylene Beads, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Diacetyl Boldine, Xanthan Gum, Glycerin, Rumex Occidentalis Extract, Stearic Acid , Cetyl Alcohol, Glyceryl Monostearate, Kojic Acid, Pyrus Malus (Apple) Fruit Extract, Phyllantus Emblica (Amla) Fruit Extract, L-carnosine, Niacinamide, Spin Trap (Phenyl Butyl Nitrone), D-alpha-tocopherol, Allantoin, Aminobutyric Acid, Citrus Aurantifolia (Lime) Oil, Mentha Piperita (Peppermint) Oil, Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender) Oil, Passiflora Incarnata Flower Extract, Curcuma Longa (Turmeric) Root Extract, Titanium Dioxide, Alcohol Denatured (Ethanol), Gluconolactone, Sodium Benzoate, Phenoxyethanol, Dimethicone

Brand Overview

gloMinerals At-A-Glance

Strengths: Very good loose- and pressed-powder mineral foundations; gentle makeup remover; great bronzing gel, blush, and eyeshadow options; the brow powder; fantastic cream lipstick; Liquid Lips; mostly good makeup brushes.

Weaknesses: Not distributed well and salons that stock this line rarely have all of the products; none of the foundations offer sun protection, which is uncommon for a mineral makeup line; the liquid foundations look too heavy and opaque on skin; average loose and pressed powders; specialty makeup products that are below standard and not worth the cost.

Another mineral makeup line has found its way into the over-marketed, overhyped, and inundated world of mineral makeup. The reason for this mineral-oriented explosion seems to be consumers' insatiable appetite for something new and the belief that the word "mineral" on a product label means it is a superior form of makeup. Mineral makeup isn't better for skin and it isn't the best way to get makeup on your face. In fact, because there are so many "mineral" products being sold, there isn't even a way to generalize what they contain because the formulas are completely random.

Claims for mineral makeup range from the sublime to the absurd, with the truth somewhere in the middle. Perhaps the most consistent claim made about mineral makeup products is that they are better for sensitive skin. That isn't the case. A mineral powder's granular nature makes it problematic for sensitive skin, and that slight abrasion over the skin is something to watch out for. The claim that mineral makeup is good for dry skin is physiologically impossible because minerals of any kind are absorbent and that means the moisture in your skin and whatever emollients you put on your face will be sucked up by the mineral powder. There are many types of foundation that work beautifully for sensitive and dry skin, but it is probably not in powder form.

When it comes to gloMinerals the only thing glowing you can count on are the claims. The press release for this makeup brand states it is a "clinical makeup system uniquely formulated for skincare professionals and their clients." The "advanced formulations" are said to combine UV protection with "pharmaceutical grade ingredients" and antioxidants. That sounds great, but the truth is there is nothing about any gloMinerals makeup product that is pharmaceutical grade; in fact, there is no such thing as pharmaceutical-grade makeup. gloMinerals products do not hold any advantage, for professionals (as in aestheticians) or anyone else; they are just powders, nothing more, nothing less. Not a single ingredient in any of the gloMinerals products is unique; the ingredients are found in almost any makeup line you care to name. That doesn't mean gloMinerals isn't worth a look, but it does mean the products aren't professional, aren't cutting edge, aren't worth the price, and certainly aren't something you need to try so you don't miss out on it.

What we find ethically distressing is that the company claims their products offer UV protection, but none of these products have an SPF rating or list any active sunscreen ingredients. Some of them do contain titanium dioxide, but unless it's listed as an active ingredient and the product has undergone the appropriate FDA testing to establish an SPF rating, you absolutely cannot rely on it for sun protection. Their claim of UV protection is either disingenuous or ignorant on the part of the company; either way, if a company can't get the sunscreen claim right, then you should think twice about any of its other claims. Plus, there are lots of companies that offer products with "mineral" in the name that do come with an SPF rating, do list the active ingredients on the label, and don't cost as much as gloMinerals products.

There are some key products to consider from gloMinerals, including their pressed-powder foundation, which definitely contains minerals; the main mineral is mica, a shiny mineral pigment that is used in thousands of makeup items. Oddly, several of the company's non-mineral products are excellent, including their cream lipstick, lip gloss, bronzing gel, and brush-on brow powder. The specialty products and those that add shine are no better than average, and the pencils are merely OK.

One more thing: gloMinerals talks up the antioxidants in their products. Most of the products contain a blend of vitamins (such as A, C, and E) with a couple of antioxidant plants such as green tea. Although adding antioxidants to makeup is a thoughtful touch, in most cases the amounts gloMinerals included are but a dusting. There's also the issue that the small amount of antioxidants won't last long in products packaged in clear jars and transparent glass bottles.

For more information about gloMinerals, call 1.800.232.0398 or visit www.gloprofessional.com.

About the Experts

The new Beautypedia Team proudly and unequivocally maintains the commitment to help you find the best products possible for your skin. We do this by relentlessly pursuing and relying on published scientific research so you will have unbiased information on what works and what doesn't-and the sneaky ways you could be making your skin worse, not better!


The Beautypedia Team reviews all products using the same research, criteria, and objectivity, whether the product being reviewed is from Paula's Choice or another brand.

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