09.21.2015
3015
Ultimate Restoring Skin Therapy Lotion, CoQ10
13 fl. oz. for $9.99
Expert Rating
Community Rating (33)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:09.21.2015
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:No

Note: We've heard from a few readers of a possible reformulation of this product. We reached out to Gold Bond and as of September 21, 2015, the ingredients listed here on Beautypedia match what is in the current U.S. formula.

This body moisturizer is great for very dry skin because it contains a high amount of urea. Urea is an excellent moisture-binding ingredient and, in this amount (likely around 10%), has an exfoliating effect too due to urea being able to break down the protein structure of dead skin cells and encourage shedding. In that sense, Ultimate Restoring Skin Therapy Lotion CoQ10 is a boon for those with uncomfortably dry, flaky skin. Adding to this is the inclusion of an impressive mix of antioxidants, cell-communicating ingredients, and skin-identical substances. It is definitely one of the better body lotions at the drugstore, and the price makes it quite a value, too! Keep in mind that urea may cause a stinging sensation upon contact with skin. This sensation should be minor and fleeting. If it isn’t, discontinue use and consider other body lotions. One more comment: coenzyme Q10 is a good antioxidant, but it's not the "king of antioxidant" as Gold Bond claims. This ingredient is listed by its chemical name of ubiquinone.

Community Reviews
Claims

The daily therapeutic lotion that helps restore and strengthen depleted, dull skin. That's because 7 nourishing moisturizers are combines with skin nurturing vitamins A, C and E plus CoQ10, the king of antioxidants. In addition, skin strengthening ceramides and lipids work to help restore elasticity, vitality and healthy skin texture.

Ingredients

Water, Hydroxyethyl Urea, Glycerin, Dimethicone, Jojoba Esters, Petrolatum, Glyceryl Stearate, Distearyldimonium Chloride, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Cetearyl Alcohol, Methyl Gluceth 20, Behentrimonium Methylsulfate, Cetearyl Alcohol, Butyrospermum (Shea Butter) Extract, Ubiquinone, Ceramide Complex 2, Palmitoyl Oligopeptide, Cocodimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Rice Protein, Niacinamide, Tocopheryl Acetate, Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate, Retinyl Palmitate, PEG 10 Rapeseed Sterol, Hydrolyzed Collagen, Polysorbate 60, Stearamidopropyl PG Dimonium Chloride Phosphate, Propylene Glycol, Steareth 21, Diazolidinyl Urea, Fragrance, Methylparaben, Hydrolyzed Jojoba Esters, EDTA (Ethylenediamine-Tetra-Acetic Acid), Propylparaben, Butylene Glycol, C12 15 Alkyl Benzoate, Tribehenin, Potassium Hydroxide

Brand Overview

Gold Bond At-A-Glance

Strengths: Inexpensive and widely available; some good body lotions including a few with urea, an excellent ingredient to smooth and soften dry, rough skin.

Weaknesses: Several products contain menthol, including a foot cream with an extremely high amount of this known irritant. Menthol is not anti-itch; it simply replaces one form of irritation (itching) with another.

There isn't a lot to write about Gold Bond despite the fact that the brand has been around for over 100 years. For the most part, Gold Bond is a staple at drugstores due to their small selection of body lotions, anti-itch products, and various foot-care products, including powders and anti-odor sprays. You can ignore any of their products with menthol. This is used in several Gold Bond products as a counter-iritant. What does that mean? Counter-irritants such as menthol are used to induce local inflammation for the purpose of relieving inflammation in deeper or adjacent tissues. In other words, they substitute one kind of inflammation for another, which is never good for skin. Irritation or inflammation, no matter what causes it or how it happens, impairs the skin's immune and healing response (Source: Skin Pharmacology and Applied Skin Physiology, November–December 2000, pages 358–371). And although your skin may not show it or doesn't react in an irritated fashion, if you apply irritants to your skin the damage is still taking place and is ongoing, so it adds up over time (Source: Skin Research and Technology, November 2001, pages 227–237). Gold Bond has some good body lotions to consider and they are fairly priced, too. But that's where the excitement for this longstanding brand starts and stops.

For more information about Gold Bond, visit www.goldbond.com or call (423) 842-5844.

About the Experts

The new Beautypedia Team proudly and unequivocally maintains the commitment to help you find the best products possible for your skin. We do this by relentlessly pursuing and relying on published scientific research so you will have unbiased information on what works and what doesn't-and the sneaky ways you could be making your skin worse, not better!


The Beautypedia Team reviews all products using the same research, criteria, and objectivity, whether the product being reviewed is from Paula's Choice or another brand.

See all reviews for this brand

Gold Bond At-A-Glance

Strengths: Inexpensive and widely available; some good body lotions including a few with urea, an excellent ingredient to smooth and soften dry, rough skin.

Weaknesses: Several products contain menthol, including a foot cream with an extremely high amount of this known irritant. Menthol is not anti-itch; it simply replaces one form of irritation (itching) with another.

There isn't a lot to write about Gold Bond despite the fact that the brand has been around for over 100 years. For the most part, Gold Bond is a staple at drugstores due to their small selection of body lotions, anti-itch products, and various foot-care products, including powders and anti-odor sprays. You can ignore any of their products with menthol. This is used in several Gold Bond products as a counter-iritant. What does that mean? Counter-irritants such as menthol are used to induce local inflammation for the purpose of relieving inflammation in deeper or adjacent tissues. In other words, they substitute one kind of inflammation for another, which is never good for skin. Irritation or inflammation, no matter what causes it or how it happens, impairs the skin's immune and healing response (Source: Skin Pharmacology and Applied Skin Physiology, November–December 2000, pages 358–371). And although your skin may not show it or doesn't react in an irritated fashion, if you apply irritants to your skin the damage is still taking place and is ongoing, so it adds up over time (Source: Skin Research and Technology, November 2001, pages 227–237). Gold Bond has some good body lotions to consider and they are fairly priced, too. But that's where the excitement for this longstanding brand starts and stops.

For more information about Gold Bond, visit www.goldbond.com or call (423) 842-5844.