06.20.2014
0
Rosa Artica Eye Youth Regenerating Eye Balm
0.5 fl. oz. for $46
Expert Rating
Community Rating (0)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:06.20.2014
Jar Packaging:Yes
Tested on animals:Yes

For what this costs, you should expect an eye cream loaded with anti-aging ingredients alongside ingredients proven to moisturize skin, all packaged so that the most important ingredients (the ones you're paying extra for) will remain as effective as possible. Sadly, what you get is a mixed bag. On the plus side, this eye cream is emollient-rich and can make good on its claim to deeply hydrate skin. The emollients this contains are great for dry skin anywhere on the face.

The formula also contains the mineral pigments mica and titanium dioxide, which lend a subtle whitening/brightening effect that can, to a minor extent, reduce the appearance of dark circles (but a concealer goes a lot further in this regard).

The weak spots are jar packaging (we explain why in the More Info section) and Kiehl's allegedly miraculous "Resurrection Flower" (listed as Haberlea Rhodopensis leaf extract) is the very last ingredient listed, meaning it's barely present and most likely not present in an amount that can help your skin. Also barely present are other state of the art anti-aging ingredients, which is truly disappointing. The shea and cocoa butters have antioxidant benefits, but not in a product like this where these ingredients would be routinely exposed to degrading light and air due to the jar packaging.

In the end, this isn't a bad eye cream, just not as exciting as it could've been and not packaged to keep the best ingredients as stable as possible once its opened.

Pros:
  • Contains some tried-and-true emollient ingredients for dry skin.
  • Makes good on its claim to "deeply hydrate" skin.
  • Mica and titanium dioxide add a soft, radiant glow to skin.
Cons:
  • Jar packaging won't keep light- and air-sensitive ingredients stable once opened.
  • Contains a teeny-tiny, likely inconsequential amount of the called-out rose extract.
  • A basic formula that's overpriced for what you get.
More Info:

Jar Packaging: The fact that this product is packaged in a jar means the beneficial ingredients won't remain stable once it is opened. All plant extracts, vitamins, antioxidants, and most other state-of-the-art ingredients break down in the presence of air, so once a jar is opened and lets the air in these important ingredients begin to deteriorate. Jars also present a hygiene issue because even if you wash your hands or use a spatula to remove the product, you're introducing bacteria that causes further breakdown of key ingredients (Sources: Free Radical Biology and Medicine, September 2007, pages 818-829; Ageing Research Reviews, December 2007, pages 271-288; Dermatologic Therapy, September-October 2007, pages 314-321; International Journal of Pharmaceutics, June 12, 2005, pages 197-203; Pharmaceutical Development and Technology, January 2002, pages 1-32; International Society for Horticultural Science, www.actahort.org/members/showpdf?booknrarnr=778_5; and www.beautypackaging.com/articles/2007/03/airless-packaging.php).

Why You May Not Need an Eye Cream: Most eye creams aren't necessary. That's either because they are poorly formulated, contain nothing special for the eye area, or come in packaging that won't keep key ingredients stable. Just because the product is labeled as an eye cream doesn't mean it's good for your eye area; in fact, many can actually make matters worse.

There is much you can do to improve signs of aging around your eyes. Any product loaded with antioxidants, skin-repairing ingredients, skin-lightening ingredients, anti-inflammatory ingredients, and effective emollients will work wonders and those ingredients don't have to come from a product labeled as an eye cream.

You would be shocked how many eye creams lack even the most basic ingredients to help skin. For example, most eye creams don't contain sunscreen. During the day that is a serious problem because it leaves the skin around your eyes vulnerable to sun damage and this absolutely will make dark circles, puffiness, and wrinkles worse!

Whatever product you put around your eye area, regardless of what it is labeled, must be well formulated and appropriate for the skin type around your eyes! That may mean you need an eye cream, but you may also do just as well applying your regular facial moisturizer around your eyes.

Community Reviews
Claims

Rosa Arctica Eye Youth Regenerating Eye Balm is infused with the rare resurrection flower to deeply hydrate and re-energize skin for visibly younger-looking eyes. Natural brighteners instantly smooth and illuminate as increased collagen and elastin production jolts cellular vitality for restored density, volume and thickness.

Ingredients

Aqua / Water, Glycerin, Ethylhexyl Palmitate, Squalane, Glyceryl Stearate, Theobroma Cacao Butter / Cocoa Seed Butter, Butyrospermum Parkii Butter / Shea Butter, Cetyl Alcohol, Beta Vulgaris / Beet Root Extract, PEG-100 Stearate, Copernicia Cerifera Cera / Carnauba Wax, Hydroxypropyl Tetrahydropyrantriol, Propylene Glycol, Phenoxyethanol, Caprylyl Glycol, Tocopherol, Sodium Polyacrylate, Chlorphenesin, Mica, Stearyl Alcohol, Myristyl Alcohol, Ci 77891 / Titanium Dioxide, Acrylates Copolymer, Adenosine, Faex Extract / Yeast Extract, Haberlea Rhodopensis / Haberlea Rhodopensis Leaf Extract.

Brand Overview

Kiehl's At-A-Glance

Kiehl’s has been around for quite some time, with its origins in a New York City-based pharmacy established in 1851. The brand is perhaps best known for its apothecary-style packaging and its best-selling (and celebrity favorite) Lip Balm #1.

Though the brand claims its products are made with the finest naturally-derived ingredients, most of its formulations include synthetically-produced ingredients as well. Like most skincare companies the line contains both good and not-so-great offerings; Kiehl’s main misstep is that many of its products contain fragrance ingredients that could irritate skin, particularly sensitive skin.

Note: Kiehl's is categorized as a brand that tests on animals because its products are sold in China. Although Kiehl's does not conduct animal testing for its products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brands state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law.” Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Paula’s Choice Research Team.

For more information about Kiehl's, call (800) 543-4572 or visit www.kiehls.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Kiehl's At-A-Glance

Kiehl’s has been around for quite some time, with its origins in a New York City-based pharmacy established in 1851. The brand is perhaps best known for its apothecary-style packaging and its best-selling (and celebrity favorite) Lip Balm #1.

Though the brand claims its products are made with the finest naturally-derived ingredients, most of its formulations include synthetically-produced ingredients as well. Like most skincare companies the line contains both good and not-so-great offerings; Kiehl’s main misstep is that many of its products contain fragrance ingredients that could irritate skin, particularly sensitive skin.

Note: Kiehl's is categorized as a brand that tests on animals because its products are sold in China. Although Kiehl's does not conduct animal testing for its products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brands state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law.” Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Paula’s Choice Research Team.

For more information about Kiehl's, call (800) 543-4572 or visit www.kiehls.com.