11.11.2016
1
Super Multi-Corrective Eye-Opening Serum
0.5 fl. oz. for $48
Expert Rating
Community Rating (0)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:11.11.2016
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

Kiehl's Super Multi-Corrective Eye-Opening Serum is nearly identical to a product from Vichy known as Liftactiv Serum 10 Eyes and Lashes. L'Oreal owns both brands, so the similarity isn't too surprising—and at least the prices, opaque, pump-style packaging, and sizes are even.

Just like with the Vichy product, the showcased ingredient (really the only ingredient of significance) in this fragrance-free eye serum is a type of sugar known as rhamnose. It's intriguing to note that although the carbohydrate (sugar) portion of rhamnose seems helpful for skin, the lipid portion (known as rhamnolipids) is not good for skin cells.

Rhamnose sugars (technically known as polysaccharides) function as a skin-restoring ingredients. They have an affinity for stimulating cells that produce fibroblasts. Since fibroblasts are cells that create skin's chief support element, this is good news for wrinkles. That's because at least in theory and in controlled lab settings, rhamnose can "tell" misbehaving fibroblast cells to begin producing normal, healthier cells (Sources: Clinics in Plastic Surgery, January 2012, Amino Acids, May 2011, Epbulication; Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, December 2008; and Pathologie-Biologie, September 2006.).

While that is great for skin, support cells can't impact sagging skin around the eyes. That's because the reason for sagging skin around the eyes is caused by muscle laxity and fat pad movement (among other issues) that rhamnose can't change.

More important, one ingredient, however good, is not enough for your skin. Skin is the body's largest organ and requires a complex mix of ingredients such as antioxidants, replenishing ingredients, and restorative ingredients, which this product has in woefully short supply. This formula lacks any other significant ingredients for skin.

What's bad for skin is the fourth ingredient, denatured alcohol. This type of alcohol can cause problems for skin, not to mention it shouldn't be applied near the eye itself. You will feel the alcohol's cooling effect as this eye serum sets, but the effect can be sensitizing and drying, not anti-aging. See More Info for further details on using products with high amounts of alcohol.

Another concerning ingredient is hydroxyethylpiperazine ethane sulfonic acid (also known as HEPES). It's a buffering ingredient (typically used to establish a neutral pH) with research indicating it can generate free radical damage in the presence of oxygen (Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry, November 2004, issue 11, pages 1696-1702). That has us worried even though research on how this directly impacts skin hasn't been done. Still, there are definitely other buffering agents that could have been used instead.

On the plus side, this serum feels silky and can make the eye area look smoother—and it's nice to see a skin replenishing ingredient like sodium hyaluronate but there's more alcohol than this ingredient which is disappointing. Overall this serum's formula doesn't warrant its super-restorative name because of the alcohol and, other than the rhamnose, a mere dusting of other beneficial ingredients. See our list of Best Serums (all of which can be applied around the eyes, too) for superior options.

Pros:
  • Makes the eye area look smoother.
  • Mica lends a soft, subtle glow to shadowed undereye area.
  • Fragrance free.
Cons:
  • Contains a high amount of alcohol, and you feel its drying effect as this serum sets.
  • Cannot lift the skin.
  • Not as robust a formula; there are better formulated eye-area products.
More Info:

Alcohol-Based Skincare Products: Alcohol's effect on your skin is similar to its effect on the rest of your body: it steals the good (hydration) and leaves the bad (dryness, redness, and discomfort). Research has made it clear that alcohol as a main ingredient in any skincare product you use repeatedly is a problem.

When we express concern about the presence of alcohol in skincare or makeup products, we're referring to denatured ethanol, which you'll most often see listed as SD alcohol, alcohol denat, denatured alcohol, or isopropyl alcohol on the ingredient label.

When you see these names of this type of alcohol listed among the first six ingredients on an ingredient label, without question they will aggravate and be cruel to skin. No way around that, it's simply bad for all skin types.

These types of volatile alcohols give products a quick-drying finish, immediately degrease skin, and feel weightless, so it's easy to see their appeal, especially for those with oily skin. But those short term benefits lead to negative long term outcomes!

Consequences include dryness, erosion of skin's surface (that's really bad for skin), and a strain on how skin replenishes, renews, and rejuvenates itself. Alcohol just weakens everything about skin.

We are often challenged on this information based on a study in the British Journal of Dermatology, July 2007, issue 1, pages 74-81 that concluded "alcohol-based hand rubs cause less irritation than hand washing…" The only thing this study showed is that alcohol was not as irritating as an even more irritating hand wash containing sodium lauryl sulfate. Think about it this way, if you test to see whether or not you'll get burnt by a flame or slowly boiling hot water, you will quickly get damaged by the fire. You will eventually be damaged by the slowly boiling hot water, it will just take longer, but burned you will be.

There are other types of "alcohols", known as fatty alcohols, which are absolutely non-irritating and can be exceptionally beneficial for skin. Examples you'll see on ingredient labels include cetyl, stearyl, and cetearyl alcohol. All of these are good ingredients for skin. It's important to discern these skin-friendly forms of alcohol from the problematic types of alcohol.

The irony of using alcohol-based products to control oily skin is that the damage from alcohol can lead to an increase in bumps and enlarged pores. Alcohol can actually increase oiliness because of the irritating feeling it creates, so the immediate de-greasing effect is eventually counteracted, prompting your oily skin to look even shinier.

References for this information:

Dermato-Endocrinology, January 2011, issue 1, pages 41-49

Experimental Dermatology, June 2008, issue 6, pages 542-551

Alcohol Journal, April 2002, issue 3, pages 179-190

Aging, March 2012, issue 3, pages 166-175

Chemical Immunology and Allergy, March 2012, pages 77-80

Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, November 2008, issue 3

Clinical Dermatology, September-October 2004, issue 5, pages 360-366.

Community Reviews
Claims
The Super Smart 5-in-1 Solution for the Eye. Lift, firm, smooth, hydrate, and restore youthful shape of the eye. Skin around the eye area looks visibly firmer, lifted and skin texture looks more refined in less than one week.
Ingredients
Water, Rhamnose, Glycerin, Alcohol Denat., Dimethicone, Hydroxyethylpiperazine Ethane Sulfonic Acid, Octyldodecanol, Sodium Hyaluronate, Mica, Phenoxyethanol, Ammonium Polyacryloyldimethyl Taurate, Titanium Dioxide, Triethanolamine, Xanthan Gum, PEG-20 Methyl Glucose Sesquistearate, Disodium EDTA, Adenosine, Salicyloyl Phytosphingosine.
Brand Overview

Kiehl's At-A-Glance

Kiehl’s has been around for quite some time, with its origins in a New York City-based pharmacy established in 1851. The brand is perhaps best known for its apothecary-style packaging and its best-selling (and celebrity favorite) Lip Balm #1.

Though the brand claims its products are made with the finest naturally-derived ingredients, most of its formulations include synthetically-produced ingredients as well. Like most skincare companies the line contains both good and not-so-great offerings; Kiehl’s main misstep is that many of its products contain fragrance ingredients that could irritate skin, particularly sensitive skin.

Note: Kiehl's is categorized as a brand that tests on animals because its products are sold in China. Although Kiehl's does not conduct animal testing for its products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brands state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law.” Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Paula’s Choice Research Team.

For more information about Kiehl's, call (800) 543-4572 or visit www.kiehls.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Kiehl's At-A-Glance

Kiehl’s has been around for quite some time, with its origins in a New York City-based pharmacy established in 1851. The brand is perhaps best known for its apothecary-style packaging and its best-selling (and celebrity favorite) Lip Balm #1.

Though the brand claims its products are made with the finest naturally-derived ingredients, most of its formulations include synthetically-produced ingredients as well. Like most skincare companies the line contains both good and not-so-great offerings; Kiehl’s main misstep is that many of its products contain fragrance ingredients that could irritate skin, particularly sensitive skin.

Note: Kiehl's is categorized as a brand that tests on animals because its products are sold in China. Although Kiehl's does not conduct animal testing for its products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brands state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law.” Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Paula’s Choice Research Team.

For more information about Kiehl's, call (800) 543-4572 or visit www.kiehls.com.