03.18.2015
6
Blue Herbal Gel Cleanser
8.4 fl. oz. for $21
Expert Rating
Community Rating (2)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:03.18.2015
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

Blue Herbal Gel Cleanser does contain 1.5% salicylic acid, but in a cleanser this ingredient is wasted because it’s not left on the skin long enough to have an effect. The real problem with this cleanser is the inclusion of ginger, cinnamon, menthol, and camphor. If you are using this product, believe us, we feel your pain!

Community Reviews
Claims

Inspired by Kiehl’s venerable and most enduring preparation, Blue Astringent Herbal Lotion, this purifying gel cleanser thoroughly cleans pores and removes traces of dirt, residue and oil which can lead to acne break-outs. Mild cleansing agents are used to formulate a completely oil-free but non-drying preparation which helps keep skin clear of new acne blemishes.

Ingredients

Active: Salicylic Acid (1.5%), Other: Water, Coco-Betaine, Propylene Glycol, Sorbitol, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Triethanolamine, Sodium Chloride, PEG-120 Methyl Glucose Dioleate, Zinc PCA, Hamamelis Virginiana (Witch Hazel) Extract, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Ponerium Officinale Root Extract, Zingiber Officinale (Ginger) Root Extract, Laminaria Saccharina Extract, Cinnamomum Cassia Bark Extract, Disodium EDTA, Camphor, Dipropylene Glycol, Menthol, Boswellia Serrata Extract, Hexylene Glycol, Benzophenone-4, Imidazolidinyl Urea, Methylparaben, Blue 1

Brand Overview

Kiehl's At-A-Glance

Kiehl’s has been around for quite some time, with its origins in a New York City-based pharmacy established in 1851. The brand is perhaps best known for its apothecary-style packaging and its best-selling (and celebrity favorite) Lip Balm #1.

Though the brand claims its products are made with the finest naturally-derived ingredients, most of its formulations include synthetically-produced ingredients as well. Like most skincare companies the line contains both good and not-so-great offerings; Kiehl’s main misstep is that many of its products contain fragrance ingredients that could irritate skin, particularly sensitive skin.

Note: Kiehl's is categorized as a brand that tests on animals because its products are sold in China. Although Kiehl's does not conduct animal testing for its products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brands state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law.” Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Paula’s Choice Research Team.

For more information about Kiehl's, call (800) 543-4572 or visit www.kiehls.com.

About the Experts

The new Beautypedia Team proudly and unequivocally maintains the commitment to help you find the best products possible for your skin. We do this by relentlessly pursuing and relying on published scientific research so you will have unbiased information on what works and what doesn't-and the sneaky ways you could be making your skin worse, not better!


The Beautypedia Team reviews all products using the same research, criteria, and objectivity, whether the product being reviewed is from Paula's Choice or another brand.

See all reviews for this brand

Kiehl's At-A-Glance

Kiehl’s has been around for quite some time, with its origins in a New York City-based pharmacy established in 1851. The brand is perhaps best known for its apothecary-style packaging and its best-selling (and celebrity favorite) Lip Balm #1.

Though the brand claims its products are made with the finest naturally-derived ingredients, most of its formulations include synthetically-produced ingredients as well. Like most skincare companies the line contains both good and not-so-great offerings; Kiehl’s main misstep is that many of its products contain fragrance ingredients that could irritate skin, particularly sensitive skin.

Note: Kiehl's is categorized as a brand that tests on animals because its products are sold in China. Although Kiehl's does not conduct animal testing for its products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brands state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law.” Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Paula’s Choice Research Team.

For more information about Kiehl's, call (800) 543-4572 or visit www.kiehls.com.