07.25.2016
6
Pomegranate Mattifying Primer
1.01 fl. oz. for $33
Expert Rating
Community Rating (1)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:07.25.2016
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:No

This highly fragrant primer has a silky, cream-gel texture that glides over skin, setting to a soft matte finish that feels a bit tight but is tolerable under makeup.

To some extent, Pomegranate Mattifying Primer helps smooth the appearance of enlarged pores and keep excess shine at bay, but how long these benefits last depends on what other products you use and how oily your skin is. Most will find the results last for a few hours, assuming you follow with a matte finish foundation and powder.

It's a shame witch hazel water is one of the main ingredients, as this can be irritating due to its astringent qualities (though the irritation is less than from more concentrated forms of witch hazel).

You'd think with pomegranate in the name this primer would be teeming with this esteemed antioxidant but it's one of the last ingredients listed.

The fragrance from Pomegranate Mattifying Primer really can linger on the skin, and fragrance, whether natural or synthetic, isn't good skin care. See More Info for details.

What of the product's non-comedogenic claim? The promise of not clogging pores is one many consumers seek out, but in truth there's no regulation governing the use of this claim, as we detail in the More Info section.

Pros:
  • Helps to keep skin matte and temporarily reduce the look of pores.
Cons:
  • The witch hazel water poses a slight risk of irritation.
  • The amount of fragrance poses a risk of irritation.
More Info:

Irritation from High Amounts of Fragrance: Daily use of products that contain a high amount of fragrance, whether the fragrant ingredients are synthetic or natural, causes chronic irritation that can damage healthy collagen production, lead to or worsen dryness, and impair your skin's ability to heal. Fragrance-free is the best way for all skin types to go for all skin types (Food and Chemical Toxicology, 2008 & American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 2003).

The sneaky part about irritation is that research has demonstrated that you don't always need to see it or feel it for your skin to suffer damage, and that damage may remain hidden for a long time (Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, 2008).

In fact, the effect of inflammation in the skin is cumulative, and repeated exposure to irritants contributes to a weakened skin barrier, slower healing (including of red marks from breakouts), and a dull, uneven complexion (Aging, 2012 & Chemical Immunology and Allergy, 2012).

Non-Comedogenic: Labels like "non-comedogenic" or "non-acnegenic" seem like safe bets, but are actually unhelpful because these terms were coined under test conditions that are not even remotely applicable to how you, or anyone for that matter, use skincare or makeup products. The "non-comedogenic" myth got its beginnings from a 1979 study published in the British Journal of Dermatology. This study examined the potential of various ingredients (cocoa and shea butters, lanolin and waxes, among others) to clog pores and lead to the formation of comedones—hence the term "comedogenic."

Under the conditions of this study, 100% pure concentrations of ingredients were layered five times per application over a period of two weeks, without cleansing the skin at any time. The manner in which these tests were conducted is not remotely similar to how we use skincare or makeup products—plus very few products are formulated with 100% of any one ingredient. What really determines whether an ingredient present in your skincare or makeup products is likely to trigger a breakout is how much of the ingredient is present in the formula and what else you apply as part of your skincare routine.

The researcher largely credited for developing the concept of comedogenic, Albert Kligman, said as much in his 1972 study, "Acne Cosmetica":

"It is not necessary to exclude constituents which might be comedogenic in a pure state. The concentration of such substances is exceedingly important. To exile such materials as lanolin, petroleum hydrocarbons, fatty alcohols, and vegetable oils from cosmetics would be irrational. What is ultimately important is the comedogenicity of the finished product (Archives of Dermatology, 1972)."

Last, the terms non-comedogenic and non-acnegenic are not regulated so they're not beholden to any agreed-upon standards. Any product, from the richest cream to the thinnest lotion, can use these claims and not have to prove they really don't clog pores or trigger acne breakouts.

Community Reviews
Claims
This clinically proven, universally nude primer blends to an invisible matte finish while minimizing the appearance of pores, balancing skin tone and texture, and preparing skin for smooth makeup application and long-lasting wear. The noncomedogenic formula is water-based so it allows skin to breathe and never clogs pores.
Ingredients
Water Dicaprylyl Ether, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Hamamelis Virginiana Flower Water, Cetearyl Alcohol, Coco-Caprylate/Caprate, Glyceryl Stearate, Cetyl Palmitate, Nylon-12, Glyceryl Stearate Citrate, Microcrystalline Cellulose, Salix Nigra (Willow) Bark Extract, Oryza Sativa (Rice) Starch, Benzyl Alcohol, Polymethylsilsesquioxane, Potassium Cetyl Phosphate, Phenoxyethanol, Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil, Xanthan Gum, Fragrance, Sodium Dehydroacetate, Cellulose Gum, Lactic Acid, Tocopherol, Sodium Phytate, Maltodextrin, Punica Granatum Extract. May Contain: Iron Oxides, Mica.
Brand Overview

Korres At-A-Glance

Korres is a Greek cosmetics line that was started by Athens-based pharmacist George Korres and his chemist wife, Lena. From its humble beginnings with a natural cough syrup steeped in Greek tradition to a long series of herbal remedies using local ingredients, Korres eventually morphed into a line of skincare infused with natural ingredients, a strong pull for many cosmetic consumers.

A key difference for Korres is that many of the natural ingredients they use are chosen based on the principles of homeopathy, a form of alternative medicine involving the administration of various diluted herbal tinctures to improve diseases. Unfortunately, there’s very little research-based support for homeopathy as it relates to great skincare.

Overall the Korres products are a fairly even mix of pros and cons. Many of their products are tricky for us to recommend, due to the frequent presence of fragrance (a problem for skin, whether it is natural or synthetically derived) and usage of jar packaging for several of their moisturizers.

For more information about Korres, visit www.korresusa.com or call 1-855-9KORRES.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Korres At-A-Glance

Korres is a Greek cosmetics line that was started by Athens-based pharmacist George Korres and his chemist wife, Lena. From its humble beginnings with a natural cough syrup steeped in Greek tradition to a long series of herbal remedies using local ingredients, Korres eventually morphed into a line of skincare infused with natural ingredients, a strong pull for many cosmetic consumers.

A key difference for Korres is that many of the natural ingredients they use are chosen based on the principles of homeopathy, a form of alternative medicine involving the administration of various diluted herbal tinctures to improve diseases. Unfortunately, there’s very little research-based support for homeopathy as it relates to great skincare.

Overall the Korres products are a fairly even mix of pros and cons. Many of their products are tricky for us to recommend, due to the frequent presence of fragrance (a problem for skin, whether it is natural or synthetically derived) and usage of jar packaging for several of their moisturizers.

For more information about Korres, visit www.korresusa.com or call 1-855-9KORRES.