07.25.2016
2
Pomegranate Toner
6.76 fl. oz. for $22
Expert Rating
Community Rating (0)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:07.25.2016
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:No

Pomegranate Toner lists alcohol as its second ingredient. See More Info to find out why seeing this ingredient in second place in a skincare product can be a problem for all skin types and makes this a worrisome consideration for any skin concern.

It does contain hydrating glycerin and a beneficial soothing plant extract, but that's not enough to redeem this toner or make it worth your beauty dollars.

Despite the mention of pomegranate in the product's name, it's barely present in the formula. Fragrance got higher billing, but fragrance isn't skin care. In fact, it can cause problems for skin, as we explain in the More Info section.

Another disappointment is that despite the claim of exfoliation from the exfoliating superstar ingredient salicylic acid, the amount of it used is too small and this product's high pH means exfoliation won't be effectively occurring. In terms of tightening pores there's no research proving the antioxidant compounds in pomegranate have that benefit.

A well formulated toner can be a wonderful addition to a skincare routine, but this one has too many issues to be worthy of strong consideration. See our list of Best Toners and Face Mists for our top recommendations.

Pros:
  • Contains a very good plant-based soothing agent.
Cons:
  • Contains a potentially irritating, drying amount of denatured alcohol.
  • Amount of fragrance poses a strong risk of irritation.
  • Witch hazel poses an additional risk of irritation (though it has some beneficial properties, too).
  • Considering the product name, the amount of pomegranate is tiny.
  • The amount of salicylic acid + this product's pH prevents it from exfoliating.
More Info:

Alcohol-Based Skincare Products: Alcohol helps ingredients like retinol and vitamin C penetrate skin more effectively, but it does so by breaking down the skin's barrier—destroying the very substances that keep your skin healthy over the long term (Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, 2012 and Journal of Hospital Infection, 2003).

A significant amount of research shows alcohol causes free-radical damage in skin even at low levels (Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, 2012). Small amounts of alcohol on skin cells in lab settings (about 3%, but keep in mind skincare products contain amounts ranging from 5% to 60% or greater) over the course of two days increased cell death by 26%. It also destroyed the substances in cells that reduce inflammation and defend against free radicals—this process actually causes more free-radical damage. Exposure to alcohol also causes skin cells to self-destruct (Alcohol, 2002).

Research also shows that these destructive and aging effects on skin cells increased the longer skin was exposed to alcohol; for example, two days of exposure were dramatically more harmful than one day, and that's at only a 3% concentration (Alcohol, 2002). In fact, the effect of inflammation in the skin is cumulative, and repeated exposure to irritants contributes to a weakened skin barrier, slower healing (including of red marks from breakouts), and a dull, uneven complexion (Aging, 2012 & Chemical Immunology and Allergy, 2012).

For more on alcohol's (as in, ethanol, denatured alcohol, and ethyl alcohol) effects on skin, see the Paula's Choice Research Team's Expert Advice article on the topic, Alcohol in Skin Care: The Facts.

Irritation from High Amounts of Fragrance: Daily use of products that contain a high amount of fragrance, whether the fragrant ingredients are synthetic or natural, causes chronic irritation that can damage healthy collagen production, lead to or worsen dryness, and impair your skin's ability to heal. Fragrance-free is the best way for all skin types to go for all skin types (Food and Chemical Toxicology, 2008 & American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 2003).

The sneaky part about irritation is that research has demonstrated that you don't always need to see it or feel it for your skin to suffer damage, and that damage may remain hidden for a long time (Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, 2008).

In fact, the effect of inflammation in the skin is cumulative, and repeated exposure to irritants contributes to a weakened skin barrier, slower healing (including of red marks from breakouts), and a dull, uneven complexion (Aging, 2012 & Chemical Immunology and Allergy, 2012).

Community Reviews
Claims
This toner exfoliates to remove excess oil and dirt, imparting a tighter, smoother, and more matte finish while reducing redness. Pomegranate extract, rich in tannins and polyphenols, tighten pores. Formulated with natural skin conditioners, this refreshing toner leaves skin feeling soft and smooth.
Ingredients
Aqua/Water/Eau, Alcohol Denat., Glycerin, Caprylyl Glycol, Citric Acid, Epilobium Fleischeri Extract, Fragrance (Parfum), Hamamelis Virginiana (Witch Hazel) Leaf Extract, Olyglyceryl-5 Laurate, Punica Granatum Fruit Extract, Salicylic Acid, Sodium Citrate, Sodium Gluceptate, Sodium Hyaluronate.
Brand Overview

Korres At-A-Glance

Korres is a Greek cosmetics line that was started by Athens-based pharmacist George Korres and his chemist wife, Lena. From its humble beginnings with a natural cough syrup steeped in Greek tradition to a long series of herbal remedies using local ingredients, Korres eventually morphed into a line of skincare infused with natural ingredients, a strong pull for many cosmetic consumers.

A key difference for Korres is that many of the natural ingredients they use are chosen based on the principles of homeopathy, a form of alternative medicine involving the administration of various diluted herbal tinctures to improve diseases. Unfortunately, there’s very little research-based support for homeopathy as it relates to great skincare.

Overall the Korres products are a fairly even mix of pros and cons. Many of their products are tricky for us to recommend, due to the frequent presence of fragrance (a problem for skin, whether it is natural or synthetically derived) and usage of jar packaging for several of their moisturizers.

For more information about Korres, visit www.korresusa.com or call 1-855-9KORRES.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Korres At-A-Glance

Korres is a Greek cosmetics line that was started by Athens-based pharmacist George Korres and his chemist wife, Lena. From its humble beginnings with a natural cough syrup steeped in Greek tradition to a long series of herbal remedies using local ingredients, Korres eventually morphed into a line of skincare infused with natural ingredients, a strong pull for many cosmetic consumers.

A key difference for Korres is that many of the natural ingredients they use are chosen based on the principles of homeopathy, a form of alternative medicine involving the administration of various diluted herbal tinctures to improve diseases. Unfortunately, there’s very little research-based support for homeopathy as it relates to great skincare.

Overall the Korres products are a fairly even mix of pros and cons. Many of their products are tricky for us to recommend, due to the frequent presence of fragrance (a problem for skin, whether it is natural or synthetically derived) and usage of jar packaging for several of their moisturizers.

For more information about Korres, visit www.korresusa.com or call 1-855-9KORRES.