04.10.2015
0
Oil Free Liquid Cleanser
5.9 fl. oz. for $28
Expert Rating
Community Rating (0)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:04.10.2015
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

Laneige goes out of their way to market Oil Free Liquid Cleanser as a gentle cleanser for sensitive skin, but a quick glance at the ingredient list reveals it's anything but! Chief among its irritating ingredients is peppermint leaf extract (Dermatitis, Nov-Dec 2010), followed by a slew of others (including orange, lemon, and Melissa officinalis—lemon balm—extracts).

This cleanser may leave skin feeling cool, tingly, and refreshed, but the reality is that what it's likely doing to skin below the surface is detrimental and can actually trigger excess oil production, making matters worse (see More Info)!

So much for being gentle! For alternatives that do not share such an abundance of irritants, check out our top-rated cleansers section instead.

Pros:

  • Removes makeup well.

Cons:

  • Loaded with irritants that can potentially damage skin.
  • Despite being oil-free, the irritants in this formula can trigger excess oil production.
  • Inappropriately marketed for sensitive skin, or for any skin type.

More Info:

Inflammation in skin is usually related to external factors such as irritation that damages the skin's barrier in numerous ways, whether you can see the reaction or not. When irritation on the surface of skin occurs, it activates specific chemicals called neuropeptides in the brain (Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 2007). Those substances are specifically the kind that regulate the hormonal system of the body.

When this happens, it leads to the formation of inflammatory chemicals directly in the oil gland. These inflammatory chemicals trigger an increase in oil production, which can increase the size of the pore, and the likelihood of acne—the more inflammation that occurs, the worse the risk (European Journal of Dermatology, 2002; and Dermatology, 2003).

Bottom line: Inflammation and its resulting irritation, whether internal or external (for this discussion externally it would be due to the use of irritating ingredients, hot water, overusing scrubs, etc.), is practically a guarantee you will see excess production of oil, larger pores, and more acne breakouts (Experimental Dermatology, 2009; and Dermato-Endocrinology, 2011).

Community Reviews
Claims
Gentle and effective. Specially formulated without oil, fragrance or alcohol to deep-clean and remove makeup from even the most sensitive skin. Purifying hyacinth and anti-oxidant rich green tea protect skin while invigorating lemon and peppermint extracts leave it refreshed, smooth
Ingredients
Propanediol, Water, Butylene Glycol, PEG-15 Glyceryl Isostearate, PEG-20- Glyceryl Triisostearate, Methyl Gluceth-20, PEG-8 Caprylic/Capric Glycerides, Glycerin, Mentha Piperita (Peppermint) Leaf Extract, Citrus Aurantium Dulcis (Orange) Fruit Extract, Primula Veris Extract, Veronica Officinals Flower/Leaf/Stem Extract, Camellia Sinensis Leaf Extract, Lactobacillus/Water Hyacinth Ferment, Melissa Officinalis Leaf Extract, Citrus Medica Limonum (Lemon) Fruit Extract, Malva Sylvestris (Mallow) Flower/Leaf/Stem Extract, Vaccinium Myrtillus Fruit/Leaf Extract, Saccharum Officinarum (Sugar Cane) Extract, Achillea Millefolium Extract, Acer Saccharum (Sugar Maple) Extract, Alchemilla Vulgaris Extract, Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein, Mannitol, Disodium EDTA, Cetrimonium Bromide.
Brand Overview

Laneige At-A-Glance

Strengths: SPF-rated products provide broad-spectrum sun protection; utilization of some intriguing melanin-inhibiting ingredients.

Weaknesses: Highly fragranced formulas put skin at risk of irritation; use of see-through bottles and jar packaging weakens the potency of the beneficial ingredients; claims for “mineral water” don’t stand up to the research; despite a higher-than-average drugstore price point, Laneige products aren’t superior to their competitors.

Laneige is a South Korean brand owned by high-end cosmetics company, AmorePacific. Launched in 1994, the story behind this brand centers around mineral water—which they tend to label “Optimal Mineral Water”—harvested from the snow-clad peaks of the Himalayas. They allegedly spent 20 years perfecting its scientifically engineered properties for skin and, according to Laneige, this “superior water” is the secret to hydrating, protecting, and revitalizing skin.

Here’s what we really know: All water that’s included in cosmetics, regardless of the source, must go through a rigorous purification process, and there isn’t any research showing that water from any one source is better for skin than water from any other source. More to the point, repairing and hydrating skin is not as simple as adding water. Even Laneige’s highly touted mineral water won’t retain moisture in skin unless the outer barrier is reinforced with ingredients like antioxidants, emollients, and skin-repairing ingredients—all of which are required or the water just evaporates. So, does Laneige deliver in that regard? Yes and no.

The problem is that their products tend to include beneficial ingredients right alongside potentially irritating ingredients (including fragrance), which detracts from what the good ingredients would otherwise be able to do for skin. In some cases, the jar or clear bottle packaging further impedes the potency and stability of the formula because many of the superstar ingredients break down in the presence of air and/or light.

As far as Laneige makeup goes, at the time of this review they sell only a BB cream in the United States, but it is also plagued by the inclusion of potentially irritating ingredients.

In the end, despite their highly touted Korean brand prestige and steeper-than-average mass-market price point (the line is sold at Target stores in the United States), Laneige ends up being more about marketing fluff than what’s actually good for skin. Beyond the mineral water, Laneige products would have merit for their anti-aging prowess, but their inclusion of potential irritants and the use of packaging that compromises the stability of the beneficial ingredients renders the products generally unworthy of consideration.

For more information about Laneige, visit www.us.laneige.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Laneige At-A-Glance

Strengths: SPF-rated products provide broad-spectrum sun protection; utilization of some intriguing melanin-inhibiting ingredients.

Weaknesses: Highly fragranced formulas put skin at risk of irritation; use of see-through bottles and jar packaging weakens the potency of the beneficial ingredients; claims for “mineral water” don’t stand up to the research; despite a higher-than-average drugstore price point, Laneige products aren’t superior to their competitors.

Laneige is a South Korean brand owned by high-end cosmetics company, AmorePacific. Launched in 1994, the story behind this brand centers around mineral water—which they tend to label “Optimal Mineral Water”—harvested from the snow-clad peaks of the Himalayas. They allegedly spent 20 years perfecting its scientifically engineered properties for skin and, according to Laneige, this “superior water” is the secret to hydrating, protecting, and revitalizing skin.

Here’s what we really know: All water that’s included in cosmetics, regardless of the source, must go through a rigorous purification process, and there isn’t any research showing that water from any one source is better for skin than water from any other source. More to the point, repairing and hydrating skin is not as simple as adding water. Even Laneige’s highly touted mineral water won’t retain moisture in skin unless the outer barrier is reinforced with ingredients like antioxidants, emollients, and skin-repairing ingredients—all of which are required or the water just evaporates. So, does Laneige deliver in that regard? Yes and no.

The problem is that their products tend to include beneficial ingredients right alongside potentially irritating ingredients (including fragrance), which detracts from what the good ingredients would otherwise be able to do for skin. In some cases, the jar or clear bottle packaging further impedes the potency and stability of the formula because many of the superstar ingredients break down in the presence of air and/or light.

As far as Laneige makeup goes, at the time of this review they sell only a BB cream in the United States, but it is also plagued by the inclusion of potentially irritating ingredients.

In the end, despite their highly touted Korean brand prestige and steeper-than-average mass-market price point (the line is sold at Target stores in the United States), Laneige ends up being more about marketing fluff than what’s actually good for skin. Beyond the mineral water, Laneige products would have merit for their anti-aging prowess, but their inclusion of potential irritants and the use of packaging that compromises the stability of the beneficial ingredients renders the products generally unworthy of consideration.

For more information about Laneige, visit www.us.laneige.com.