04.10.2015
5
Water Bank Moisture Cream
1.6 fl. oz. for $32
Expert Rating
Community Rating (0)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:04.10.2015
Jar Packaging:Yes
Tested on animals:Yes

Water Bank Moisture Cream has a rich texture and a silky feel well-suited for normal to dry skin, but will it strengthen skin's barrier and retain moisture as claimed? It comes close, but then dashes all hope with the inclusion of potentially irritating, wafting fragrance. This fragrance can contribute to the breakdown of the vital substances your skin needs to stay healthy and hydrated (see More Info for the full scoop), and is the chief reason we cannot rate this higher.

Otherwise, Water Bank Moisture Cream is loaded with proven emollients, skin-repairing ingredients, antioxidants, and water-binding agents (glycerin, propanediol, beta-glucan, meadowfoam seed oil, and squalene to name a few), but even then, the stability of the formula is compromised by the jar packaging (see More Info to find out why this type of packaging is generally one to avoid).

By the way, if you were lured in by the "Optimal Mineral Water" claims, see our debunking of that in the brand summary.

Instead of banking on this cream of false hopes, find state-of-the-art options backed by research on our list of Best Moisturizers!

Pros:

  • Contains emollients, skin-repairing ingredients, and antioxidants ideal for repairing dry skin.

Cons:

  • Contains fragrance, which can deplete skin of vital substances.
  • Jar packaging allows the antioxidants to break down rapidly, reducing their anti-aging benefit.

More Info:

Irritation from High Amounts of Fragrance: Daily use of products that contain a high amount of fragrance, whether the fragrant ingredients are synthetic or natural, causes chronic irritation that can damage healthy collagen production, lead to or worsen dryness, and impair your skin's ability to heal. Fragrance-free is the best way to go for all skin types (Food and Chemical Toxicology, 2008; and American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 2003).

The sneaky part about irritation is that research has demonstrated that you don't always need to see it or feel it for your skin to suffer damage, and that damage may remain hidden for a long time (Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, 2008).

In fact, the effect of inflammation in the skin is cumulative, and repeated exposure to irritants contributes to a weakened skin barrier, slower healing (including of red marks from breakouts), and a dull, uneven complexion (Aging, 2012; and Chemical Immunology and Allergy, 2012).

Jar Packaging: The fact that it's packaged in a jar means the beneficial ingredients won't remain stable once it is opened. All plant extracts, almost all vitamins, antioxidants, and other state-of-the-art ingredients break down in the presence of air. Therefore, once a jar is opened and lets the air in, these important ingredients begin to deteriorate. Jars also are unsanitary because you're dipping your fingers into them with each use, adding bacteria that further deteriorate the beneficial ingredients.

The vast majority of ingredients that are most beneficial for your skin are not stable in the presence of light and air, which is exactly what happens when you take the lid off a jar (Pharmacology Review, 2013; and Journal of Biophotonics, 2010).

One of the critical factors in any anti-aging or skin-healing formula is the amount and variety of antioxidants, cell-communicating ingredients, and skin-repairing ingredients, and the more the better. These function in a variety of ways to reduce the effects of the constant environmental stresses your skin experiences (Dermatology Research and Practice, 2012; and The Journal of Pathology, 2007).

Antioxidants, cell-communicating ingredients, and skin-repairing ingredients not only can help prevent free-radical damage, but also, to a fairly impressive extent, help repair that damage. Surprisingly, almost all of these ingredients are just as vulnerable to sun exposure, pollution, and cigarette smoke as your skin (Pharmacognosy Review, 2013; and Journal of Biophotonics, 2010).

Once you open that jar you bought, you immediately compromise the stability of the anti-aging superstars it contains. (You can visualize their benefits disappearing like puffs of air each time you open up that lid!)

Community Reviews
Claims
Richly-texturized moisturizing cream. Optimal Mineral Water. Delivers 6 moisture-maximizing minerals deep into skin. Strengthens skin’s moisture barrier. Circulates and retains moisture all day. Absorbs easily for smooth, supple skin.
Ingredients
Water, Butylene Glycol, Dimethicone, Glycerin, Propanediol, Squalane, Hydrogenated C6-14 Olefin Polymers, Octyldodecyl Myristate, Limnanthes Alba (Meadowfoam) Seed Oil, Cyclopentasiloxane, Glyceryl Stearate, Polyglyceryl-3 Methylglucose Distearate, Cetearyl Alcohol, Cyclohexasiloxane, Beta-Glucan, Mangifera Indica (Mango) Seed Oil, Citrulline, Alanine, Arginine, Glycogen, Glutamic Acid, Glyceryl Oleate, Lysine HCl, Salicornia Herbacea Extract, Threonine, Trehalose, Magnesium Sulfate, Manganese Sulfate, Zinc Sulfate, Mannitol, Vitis Vinifera (Grape) Seed Oil, Behenyl Alcohol, Serine, Sucrose, Sucrose Stearate, Stearic Acid, Stearyl Behenate, Ethylhexylglycerin, Inulin Lauryl Carbamate, Calcium Citrate, Cocamide Mipa, Polysorbate 20, Polysilicone-11, Polyacrylate-13, Polyisobutene, PCA, PEG-100 Stearate, PEG-15 Pentaerythrityl Tetra (Laureth-6 Carboxylate), PEG-40 Stearate Hydroxypropyl Bispalmitamide MEA, Histidine HCl, Phenoxyethanol, Disodium EDTA, Fragrance.
Brand Overview

Laneige At-A-Glance

Strengths: SPF-rated products provide broad-spectrum sun protection; utilization of some intriguing melanin-inhibiting ingredients.

Weaknesses: Highly fragranced formulas put skin at risk of irritation; use of see-through bottles and jar packaging weakens the potency of the beneficial ingredients; claims for “mineral water” don’t stand up to the research; despite a higher-than-average drugstore price point, Laneige products aren’t superior to their competitors.

Laneige is a South Korean brand owned by high-end cosmetics company, AmorePacific. Launched in 1994, the story behind this brand centers around mineral water—which they tend to label “Optimal Mineral Water”—harvested from the snow-clad peaks of the Himalayas. They allegedly spent 20 years perfecting its scientifically engineered properties for skin and, according to Laneige, this “superior water” is the secret to hydrating, protecting, and revitalizing skin.

Here’s what we really know: All water that’s included in cosmetics, regardless of the source, must go through a rigorous purification process, and there isn’t any research showing that water from any one source is better for skin than water from any other source. More to the point, repairing and hydrating skin is not as simple as adding water. Even Laneige’s highly touted mineral water won’t retain moisture in skin unless the outer barrier is reinforced with ingredients like antioxidants, emollients, and skin-repairing ingredients—all of which are required or the water just evaporates. So, does Laneige deliver in that regard? Yes and no.

The problem is that their products tend to include beneficial ingredients right alongside potentially irritating ingredients (including fragrance), which detracts from what the good ingredients would otherwise be able to do for skin. In some cases, the jar or clear bottle packaging further impedes the potency and stability of the formula because many of the superstar ingredients break down in the presence of air and/or light.

As far as Laneige makeup goes, at the time of this review they sell only a BB cream in the United States, but it is also plagued by the inclusion of potentially irritating ingredients.

In the end, despite their highly touted Korean brand prestige and steeper-than-average mass-market price point (the line is sold at Target stores in the United States), Laneige ends up being more about marketing fluff than what’s actually good for skin. Beyond the mineral water, Laneige products would have merit for their anti-aging prowess, but their inclusion of potential irritants and the use of packaging that compromises the stability of the beneficial ingredients renders the products generally unworthy of consideration.

For more information about Laneige, visit www.us.laneige.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Laneige At-A-Glance

Strengths: SPF-rated products provide broad-spectrum sun protection; utilization of some intriguing melanin-inhibiting ingredients.

Weaknesses: Highly fragranced formulas put skin at risk of irritation; use of see-through bottles and jar packaging weakens the potency of the beneficial ingredients; claims for “mineral water” don’t stand up to the research; despite a higher-than-average drugstore price point, Laneige products aren’t superior to their competitors.

Laneige is a South Korean brand owned by high-end cosmetics company, AmorePacific. Launched in 1994, the story behind this brand centers around mineral water—which they tend to label “Optimal Mineral Water”—harvested from the snow-clad peaks of the Himalayas. They allegedly spent 20 years perfecting its scientifically engineered properties for skin and, according to Laneige, this “superior water” is the secret to hydrating, protecting, and revitalizing skin.

Here’s what we really know: All water that’s included in cosmetics, regardless of the source, must go through a rigorous purification process, and there isn’t any research showing that water from any one source is better for skin than water from any other source. More to the point, repairing and hydrating skin is not as simple as adding water. Even Laneige’s highly touted mineral water won’t retain moisture in skin unless the outer barrier is reinforced with ingredients like antioxidants, emollients, and skin-repairing ingredients—all of which are required or the water just evaporates. So, does Laneige deliver in that regard? Yes and no.

The problem is that their products tend to include beneficial ingredients right alongside potentially irritating ingredients (including fragrance), which detracts from what the good ingredients would otherwise be able to do for skin. In some cases, the jar or clear bottle packaging further impedes the potency and stability of the formula because many of the superstar ingredients break down in the presence of air and/or light.

As far as Laneige makeup goes, at the time of this review they sell only a BB cream in the United States, but it is also plagued by the inclusion of potentially irritating ingredients.

In the end, despite their highly touted Korean brand prestige and steeper-than-average mass-market price point (the line is sold at Target stores in the United States), Laneige ends up being more about marketing fluff than what’s actually good for skin. Beyond the mineral water, Laneige products would have merit for their anti-aging prowess, but their inclusion of potential irritants and the use of packaging that compromises the stability of the beneficial ingredients renders the products generally unworthy of consideration.

For more information about Laneige, visit www.us.laneige.com.