06.27.2013
2
Murad
Essential-C Eye Cream SPF 15/P++
Rating
0.5 fl. oz. for $69
Category:Skin Care > Retinol Products > Eye Moisturizers
Last Updated:06.27.2013
Jar Packaging:False
pH:
Tested on animals:No
Overview

Essential-C Eye Cream SPF 15 has been reformulated to include avobenzone for reliable UVA protection. Although that’s good news, the avobenzone and other synthetic sunscreen actives can be problematic when used near the eyes, which is exactly how this product is supposed to be applied. Of course, not everyone’s eye-area skin will react negatively to these sunscreen actives, but if you notice any stinging, burning, or redness discontinue use and consider a mineral-based moisturizer or concealer with sunscreen (it need not be labeled “eye cream”). If your eye-area skin can tolerate the sunscreens in this product, it’s a good, lightweight eye cream for slightly dry skin. Emollients are preset but take a backseat to water-binding agents. The formula includes several antioxidants, retinol, and some intriguing plant extracts, some of which have no known or proven benefit when applied topically. Still, if you’re going to splurge on a Murad product, this is one to consider. By the way, the “C” in “Essential-C” stands for vitamin C but this ingredient isn’t front-and-center here.

Claims

Our patented Skin Repair System with Co-3 stimulates collagen synthesis. Caffeine and tiger's herb increase elasticity and firm the skin. Light diffusers soften the appearance of fine lines and dark circles for a luminous glow.

Ingredients

Active: Avobenzone (3%), Homosalate (4%), Octisalate (5%), Other: Water, Butylene Glycol, Bis-Diglyceryl Polyacyladipate-2, Caprylic/Capric/Myristic/Stearic Triglyceride, Shorea Stenoptera Seed Butter, Cetyl Alcohol, PEG-100 Stearate, Glyceryl Stearate, Silica, Stearic Acid, Dimethicone, Cetyl Phosphate, Rice Amino Acids, Zinc Aspartate, Ascorbic Acid, Chitosan, Propyl Gallate, Retinol, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Persea Gratissima (Avocado) Oil, Cimicifuga Racemosa Root Extract, Caffeine, Siloxanetriol Alginate, Methylsilanol Mannuronate, Phospholipids, Tocopheryl Acetate, Retinyl Palmitate, Ascorbyl Palmitate, Panthenol, Sodium PCA, Proline, Sodium Lactate, Sorbitol, Polyester-8, Carbomer, Aminomethyl Propanol, Disodium EDTA, Phenoxyethanol, Caprylyl Glycol, Chlorphenesin, Titanium Dioxide, Iron Oxides

Brand Overview

Murad At-A-Glance

Strengths: A few good cleansers; a selection of well-formulated AHA products centered on glycolic acid; most of Murad's top-rated products are fragrance-free; the sunscreens go beyond the basics and include several antioxidants for enhanced protection.

Weaknesses: Expensive; no other dermatologist-designed line has more problem products than Murad; irritating ingredients are peppered throughout the selection of products, keeping several of them from earning a recommendation; the skin-lighteners are not well-formulated.

Dr. Murad was one of the first doctors to appear on an infomercial selling his own line of skin-care products, and quite successfully so, at least the second time around. This was largely because the company paid for independent clinical studies to establish the efficacy of Dr. Murad's products. There's no question that AHA products, when well-formulated, can be a powerful ally to create healthier, radiant skin. But in terms of independent clinical studies, we're skeptical, given that there are countless labs that exist solely to perform such studies in strict accordance with how the company wants the results to turn out. Murad certainly wouldn't mention in an infomercial that the clinical studies for his AHA products weren't as impressive as, say, those for Neutrogena's AHA products, or any other line for that matter. And what about BHA products? Clinical studies and testimonials may have prompted consumers to order, but the results from Murad's AHA products are hardly unique to this line.

Although this is a skin-care line to consider for some good AHA options, the majority of the products are nothing more than a problem for skin. Murad may have been one of the first dermatologist-developed skin-care lines, but by today's standards his line is deplorable. This is largely due to a preponderance of irritating ingredients that show up in product after product. Any dermatologist selling products that include lavender, basil, and various citrus oils plus menthol and other irritants doesn't deserve to be taken seriously. The same goes for Murad's overuse of alcohol and his preference for treating acne with sulfur, both factors that keep some of his otherwise well-formulated, efficacious products from earning a recommendation.

Yet what is most objectionable is the endless parade of products claiming they can stop, get rid of, or reduce wrinkles and aging. Regardless of whether dermatologists know best about lotions and potions, no conscientious doctor would or should be selling products using the ludicrous claims Murad makes. Most of the anti-aging products have the same hype, the same unsubstantiated claims, and the same exaggeration about the beneficial effects of ingredients that are often present only in the tiniest amounts, without even a mention of the standard or potentially irritating ingredients that are also present. Dr. Murad’s skin-care philosophy, stated on his Web site, includes the following statement: "Take all the necessary steps to achieve healthy skin—including the right products, the proper nutrients (from both food and supplements) and positive lifestyle choices." That's an excellent piece of advice; the problem is that it is contradicted by Murad’s own products, most of which are far from the "right" options for all skin types.

For more information about Murad, call (888) 996-8723 or visit www.murad.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia Research Team is dedicated to helping you find the absolute best products for your skin, using research-based criteria to review beauty products from an honest, balanced perspective. Each member of the team was personally trained by Paula Begoun herself.

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Wednesday, April 10, 2013
It burns.

I cannot believe the paulas choice review on this is so high, when it burns. It was the only new thing in my skin care routine, ie it was definitely the eye cream. I gave it to my mom, it burned her. Gave it to a friend, it burned her. She gave it to her mom, same thing. I lost track of what happened to it, but I ask, how many people can use this, and whats the point with spf 15? Why not use a regular high spf? In the summer if this sweats into your eyes, it burns so bad you think it will blind.

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Teasha
Paula's Choice Research Team Response
Replied on: Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Thank you for your comments! In our review we do warn that the sunscreen components in this eye cream can cause burning and stinging in some people. We're sorry to hear you were among them!

—Paula's Choice Research Team
Saturday, February 16, 2013
a winner!

A wonderful SPF cream for around the eyes. I've tried many SPF products that work well on the rest of my face, but leave my eye makeup smudged and sliding down my face. This is a case when there is actually a reason to use something else besides what is used on the rest of the face. Murad Essential C Eye Cream doesn't cause my makeup to run, and it's become part of my daily routine, 365 days a year, for several years. After all, if I'm not wearing it, it's not protecting my from the sun!

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