01.22.2015
0
Neo-Cleanse Gentle Skin Cleanser
4 fl. oz. for $32
Expert Rating
Community Rating (0)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:01.22.2015
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:No

For about $30, the Neo-Cleanse Gentle Skin Cleanser is a basic soap cleanser in a cream base that would be best for those with normal to dry skin that isn’t prone to breakouts. As a soap formula, its mixture of fatty acids (stearic, myristic, and lauric), combined with the alkaline potassium hydroxide, has the potential to irritate skin—especially if you get this into the eye area. While the high amount of glycerin may offset its potential to irritate, it also makes it very difficult to rinse completely from skin. In short, this is not a gentle cleanser.

Here is an interesting, and infuriating, fact for you: Without the cleansing agent coco-glucoside, this would be a basic, standard shaving cream formula due to its mix of fatty acids, glycerin, and potassium hydroxide—the latter of which helps soften hair when present in higher amounts. But we digress…

Neocutis claims that this fragrance-free cleanser is “specially formulated to work together with Neocutis skincare,” but that would be equally true of any cleanser—you needn’t believe this oldest of cosmetics myths. There is no reason not to mix products from different skincare lines, so long as they’re well formulated and appropriate for your skin type.

When you consider how unexceptional this formula is—and its audacious price tag for what amounts to an irritating soap formula in a tube—there is no reason to consider it over the many better alternatives on our list of Best Cleansers.

Pros:
  • Fragrance-free.
Cons:
  • Potentially irritating soap base (especially if you get it into your eyes).
  • Expensive for such a basic formula and the smaller-than-usual size.
  • Difficult to rinse.
Community Reviews
Claims
Formulated without harsh sulfate detergents, dyes or fragrances for skin that feels fresh, clean and comfortable after cleansing. Specifically formulated to work together with NEOCUTIS skincare.
Ingredients
Water (Aqua), Glycerin, Stearic Acid, Glyceryl Stearate, Myristic Acid, Lauric Acid, Coco-Glucoside, Cellulose Gum, Microcrystalline Cellulose, Potassium Hydroxide, Xanthan Gum, Tetrasodium EDTA, Methylparaben, Propylparaben, Ethylparaben, Butylparaben, Phenoxyethanol.
Brand Overview

Strengths: Fragrance-free products; use of pump or tube packaging protects the light- and air-sensitive ingredients; excellent vitamin C serum and retinol product.

Weaknesses: Many of the anti-aging moisturizers and treatments are disappointingly simple formulas; expensive; some products rely on unproven ingredients.

If you’ve heard of the Neocutis brand, it’s likely because a dermatologist or aesthetician recommended one of their moisturizers or treatments. Like many skincare brands catering to patients of dermatologists and so-called “medi spas,” the claims associated with their products play off the perception of “prescription results” via ingredients that have medicinal-sounding names such as “Processed Skin Proteins” and “Melaplex.” It’s all designed to make you think you’re getting something special along with the pedigree of the doctor or spa retailing this line. As you’ll see from the reviews, that’s not true, although there are some good products to be found here.

Now headquartered in San Francisco, California, Neocutis was founded in Switzerland in 2003 by a group of physicians and biologists who realized the [marketing] potential of human cells in skincare products—specifically, amino acids and proteins (which is where their trademarked ingredients with exotic-sounding names come into play).

Despite their beginnings and their initial exclusivity to dermatologists’ offices, today you can order Neocutis products from beauty sites and other online retailers. Their line includes a range of products that caters to those whose foremost concerns are treating and preventing signs of aging. As a result, you’ll find Neocutis offers moisturizers, eye creams, and targeted treatments, many of which are themed around their trademarked “PSP,” or “Processed Skin Proteins.” Note: They claim this blend of peptides, proteins, and other substances “harnesses the power of human-cell derived growth factors and cytokines.”

What Neocutis isn’t telling you is that this blend of cytokines and human-cell derived growth factors has little research demonstrating any benefit for skin, and certainly not in comparison to the numerous well-researched antioxidants and cell-communicating agents used in so many of today’s best anti-aging products (see the More Info section of the products reviewed here for more details on PSP).

We should also note that, at the time of this review, Neocutis does not universally adhere to cosmetics ingredient labeling regulations on some of their products. In some cases, they do not list individually the proteins and amino acids that make up their PSP blend, which violates International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients (INCI) and FDA labeling regulatory requirements. This is important to mention, as they’re lumping this mix of proteins and amino acids together rather than listing them separately, making it impossible to know exactly what you’re putting on your face.

Unfortunately, despite the pomp and circumstance surrounding these products, most are extraordinarily overpriced and contain a surprisingly bland mix of basic moisturizing ingredients with a dusting of antioxidants. When we say “dusting” of beneficial ingredients, we really mean just that; in fact, one of their “remarkable” moisturizers is little more than a mix of glycerin, glycol, and thickeners, with a price tag topping $160!

On a positive note, Neocutis does have two outstanding products—one vitamin C serum and a retinol product—that are (like all of their formulas) fragrance-free and packaged to protect their light- and air-sensitive ingredients. What’s certain is that Neocutis doesn’t have enough going for it to make putting together an entire anti-aging skincare routine from their products a good idea, for your skin or for your budget!

For more information on Neocutis, call 1-866-636-2884 or visit http://www.neocutis.com/.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Strengths: Fragrance-free products; use of pump or tube packaging protects the light- and air-sensitive ingredients; excellent vitamin C serum and retinol product.

Weaknesses: Many of the anti-aging moisturizers and treatments are disappointingly simple formulas; expensive; some products rely on unproven ingredients.

If you’ve heard of the Neocutis brand, it’s likely because a dermatologist or aesthetician recommended one of their moisturizers or treatments. Like many skincare brands catering to patients of dermatologists and so-called “medi spas,” the claims associated with their products play off the perception of “prescription results” via ingredients that have medicinal-sounding names such as “Processed Skin Proteins” and “Melaplex.” It’s all designed to make you think you’re getting something special along with the pedigree of the doctor or spa retailing this line. As you’ll see from the reviews, that’s not true, although there are some good products to be found here.

Now headquartered in San Francisco, California, Neocutis was founded in Switzerland in 2003 by a group of physicians and biologists who realized the [marketing] potential of human cells in skincare products—specifically, amino acids and proteins (which is where their trademarked ingredients with exotic-sounding names come into play).

Despite their beginnings and their initial exclusivity to dermatologists’ offices, today you can order Neocutis products from beauty sites and other online retailers. Their line includes a range of products that caters to those whose foremost concerns are treating and preventing signs of aging. As a result, you’ll find Neocutis offers moisturizers, eye creams, and targeted treatments, many of which are themed around their trademarked “PSP,” or “Processed Skin Proteins.” Note: They claim this blend of peptides, proteins, and other substances “harnesses the power of human-cell derived growth factors and cytokines.”

What Neocutis isn’t telling you is that this blend of cytokines and human-cell derived growth factors has little research demonstrating any benefit for skin, and certainly not in comparison to the numerous well-researched antioxidants and cell-communicating agents used in so many of today’s best anti-aging products (see the More Info section of the products reviewed here for more details on PSP).

We should also note that, at the time of this review, Neocutis does not universally adhere to cosmetics ingredient labeling regulations on some of their products. In some cases, they do not list individually the proteins and amino acids that make up their PSP blend, which violates International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients (INCI) and FDA labeling regulatory requirements. This is important to mention, as they’re lumping this mix of proteins and amino acids together rather than listing them separately, making it impossible to know exactly what you’re putting on your face.

Unfortunately, despite the pomp and circumstance surrounding these products, most are extraordinarily overpriced and contain a surprisingly bland mix of basic moisturizing ingredients with a dusting of antioxidants. When we say “dusting” of beneficial ingredients, we really mean just that; in fact, one of their “remarkable” moisturizers is little more than a mix of glycerin, glycol, and thickeners, with a price tag topping $160!

On a positive note, Neocutis does have two outstanding products—one vitamin C serum and a retinol product—that are (like all of their formulas) fragrance-free and packaged to protect their light- and air-sensitive ingredients. What’s certain is that Neocutis doesn’t have enough going for it to make putting together an entire anti-aging skincare routine from their products a good idea, for your skin or for your budget!

For more information on Neocutis, call 1-866-636-2884 or visit http://www.neocutis.com/.