12.02.2014
1114
deep fill fix instant line filler and long-term wrinkle smoother
0.12 fl. oz. for $34
Expert Rating
Community Rating (1)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:12.02.2014
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

This fragrance-free, silicone-based wrinkle filler is housed in a pen-style component outfitted with a brush applicator. Twisting the base of the component feeds product onto the brush, allowing you to paint the product on wrinkles to fill them in. Does it work? Like others cut from the same cloth, yes, though not to a degree where your wrinkles vanish. Still, there's much to like about this wrinkle filler, and as long as you don' t have unrealistic expectations, it's worth a look.

The silky, spackle-like texture helps fill in superficial lines and wrinkles instantly (as claimed) but the effect on deep or etched wrinkles is less apparent, and short-lived. All such wrinkle fillers are a temporary fix that offer tremendous smoothing. How long the fix lasts depends on the depth and extent of your wrinkles plus how expressive you are (as in, how much you move your facial muscles).

Beyond the temporary filling and smoothing effect, we're thrilled that the formula treats skin to some very good repairing ingredients, including a unique plant extract known to reduce inflammation, a key factor in fueling the aging process (Source: Journal of Dermatology, October 2006, pages 676–683). Deep Fill Fix Instant Line Filler and Long-Term Wrinkle Smoother is suitable for all skin types, and its formula is fine for use around the eyes.

Pros:
  • Works (albeit temporarily) to fill in lines and wrinkles.
  • Silky, spackle-like texture leaves skin very smooth.
  • Fragrance-free.
  • Contains a great range of anti-aging ingredients.
  • Easy to apply!
Cons:
  • None (the size is small but a little goes a long way).
Community Reviews
Claims

This targeted treatment provides instant and long-term smoothing benefits for lines and wrinkles.

Ingredients

Cyclopentasiloxane, Isododecane, Polymethylsilsesquioxane, Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Dimethicone, Silica, PPG-12/SDMI Copolymer, C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Ethoxydiglycol, Dimethicone/Vinyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Elaeis Guineensis (Palm) Oil, Palmitoyl Oligopeptide, Ceramide 2, Bidens Pilosa Extract, Bisabolol, Hexylresorcinol, Tetrahexyldecyl Ascorbate, Tocopherol, Cetylhydroxyproline Palmitamide, Brassica Campestris (Rapeseed) Sterols, Linum Usitatissimum (Linseed) Seed Oil, Gossypium Herbaceum (Cotton) Seed Oil, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Tribehenin, Ethyl Linoleate, Hexyldecanol, PEG-10 Rapeseed Sterol, Stearic Acid, Caprylyl Glycol, Phenoxyethanol.

Brand Overview

philosophy At-A-Glance

Strengths: Relatively inexpensive; some of the best products are fragrance-free; very good retinol products; selection of state-of-the-art moisturizers; innovative skin-lightening product.

Weaknesses: Irritating and/or drying cleansers; average to problematic scrubs; at-home peel kits far more gimmicky than helpful; several products contain lavender oil; several products include irritating essential oils; the majority of makeup items do not rise above average status.

Believe in miracles. That's the "lifestyle" branding statement philosophy makes, which is an approach that is decidedly different from their former positioning, which encompassed family values and spirituality along with a dash of department-store élan and endearingly clever quips. The miracle angle may grab your attention, but the company is also quick to point out that its history is steeped in providing products to dermatologists and plastic surgeons worldwide (so, in addition to miracles, philosophy has a serious side, too). Although its heritage may have included providing clinically oriented products to doctors, we have yet to see or hear of any medical professional retailing philosophy products. And that's a good thing because, by and large, most of philosophy products are resounding disappointments. Moreover, several products, including almost all of their sunscreens, contain one or more known skin irritants. We would be extremely suspicious of a dermatologist or plastic surgeon who recommended such products to their patients, and even more so if they actually believed some of the more farfetched claims philosophy makes.

Interestingly, when you shop this line at department stores or at the cosmetics boutique Sephora, what you'll notice is the preponderance of food- and drink-scented bath products, all in vivid colors or cutely boxed for gift-giving. It seems that somewhere along the way, the company decided to promote these nose-appeal products while downplaying their more serious-minded, simply packaged skin care. Perhaps the body lotions and bubble baths have become philosophy's bread and butter. Given the hit-or-miss nature of their facial-care products, that's not surprising. Then again, they've also heavily promoted their anti-aging-themed Miracle Worker products...

So what's to like if you're into the vibe philosophy puts out? Well, this is still a line with some well-formulated staples, including an AHA product, some retinol options, and a handful of state-of-the-art moisturizers. The products that get the most promotion at the counter are the ones you should avoid, such as the at-home peels, scrubs, pads, and anti-acne products. However, the somewhat confusing, conflicting image philosophy presents shouldn't keep you from considering their best products—but it's not a lifestyle brand in the sense that using the entire line will somehow bring you a more joyful existence, or significantly improved skin. The philosophy line is now owned Coty, a cosmetics brand primarily known for their fragrances. Their acquisition of philosophy is their first major foray into a widely-distributed skin care brand.

For more information about philosophy, call (800) 568-3151 or visit www.philosophy.com.

Note: philosophy opts to use lowercase letters for every product they sell, so the listings below are simply following suit.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


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See all reviews for this brand

philosophy At-A-Glance

Strengths: Relatively inexpensive; some of the best products are fragrance-free; very good retinol products; selection of state-of-the-art moisturizers; innovative skin-lightening product.

Weaknesses: Irritating and/or drying cleansers; average to problematic scrubs; at-home peel kits far more gimmicky than helpful; several products contain lavender oil; several products include irritating essential oils; the majority of makeup items do not rise above average status.

Believe in miracles. That's the "lifestyle" branding statement philosophy makes, which is an approach that is decidedly different from their former positioning, which encompassed family values and spirituality along with a dash of department-store élan and endearingly clever quips. The miracle angle may grab your attention, but the company is also quick to point out that its history is steeped in providing products to dermatologists and plastic surgeons worldwide (so, in addition to miracles, philosophy has a serious side, too). Although its heritage may have included providing clinically oriented products to doctors, we have yet to see or hear of any medical professional retailing philosophy products. And that's a good thing because, by and large, most of philosophy products are resounding disappointments. Moreover, several products, including almost all of their sunscreens, contain one or more known skin irritants. We would be extremely suspicious of a dermatologist or plastic surgeon who recommended such products to their patients, and even more so if they actually believed some of the more farfetched claims philosophy makes.

Interestingly, when you shop this line at department stores or at the cosmetics boutique Sephora, what you'll notice is the preponderance of food- and drink-scented bath products, all in vivid colors or cutely boxed for gift-giving. It seems that somewhere along the way, the company decided to promote these nose-appeal products while downplaying their more serious-minded, simply packaged skin care. Perhaps the body lotions and bubble baths have become philosophy's bread and butter. Given the hit-or-miss nature of their facial-care products, that's not surprising. Then again, they've also heavily promoted their anti-aging-themed Miracle Worker products...

So what's to like if you're into the vibe philosophy puts out? Well, this is still a line with some well-formulated staples, including an AHA product, some retinol options, and a handful of state-of-the-art moisturizers. The products that get the most promotion at the counter are the ones you should avoid, such as the at-home peels, scrubs, pads, and anti-acne products. However, the somewhat confusing, conflicting image philosophy presents shouldn't keep you from considering their best products—but it's not a lifestyle brand in the sense that using the entire line will somehow bring you a more joyful existence, or significantly improved skin. The philosophy line is now owned Coty, a cosmetics brand primarily known for their fragrances. Their acquisition of philosophy is their first major foray into a widely-distributed skin care brand.

For more information about philosophy, call (800) 568-3151 or visit www.philosophy.com.

Note: philosophy opts to use lowercase letters for every product they sell, so the listings below are simply following suit.