here comes the sun gradual glow self-tanner for body (Discontinued)

by philosophy  
Price:
$28 - 4 fl. oz.
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Category:
Skin Care > Self-Tanners > Self-Tanners
Last Updated:
7/1/2014
Jar Packaging:
No
Tested On Animals:
Yes

This is a standard, but good, self-tanner. Although the name says “body” which implies from the neck down, this can also be applied to the face. Its actually a better formula than the version philosophy offers for the face, though like their facial self-tanner, this body version contains fragrance ingredients that pose a risk of irritation. The amounts are low, which is good, but ultimately if self-tanner is something you apply often, consider a fragrance-free formula to spare your skin from irritation.

In addition to dihydroxyacetone (DHA) the ingredient in most self-tanners than bronzes skin, this also contains the slower-acting self-tanning ingredient erythrulose, so you get color in a few hours that deepens within a day or so. That’s nice, but not unique to this product. The amount of DHA in this self-tanner makes it suitable for fair to medium skin.

Ultimately, this would earn our top rating were it not for the concern over the fragrance ingredients. Unlike many self-tanners, this contains some notable antioxidants and repairing ingredients. As such, it goes beyond merely turning skin tan.

here comes the sun age-defense golden glow self-tanner for body provides a sun-inspired golden glow, while helping to firm and tone skin. Oil-free, streak-free formula is easy to apply.

Water, Isononyl Isononanoate, Dihydroxyacetone, C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Glycerin, Hydroxyethyl Acrylate/Sodium Acryloyldimethyl Taurate Copolymer, Cyclopentasiloxane, Erythrulose, Cyclohexasiloxane, Shea Butter Glycerides, Dipalmitoyl Hydroxyproline, Cetearyl Alcohol, Glyceryl Stearate, Isohexadecane, Cetyl Alcohol, PEG-100 stearate, Ascorbyl Linoleate, Glutathione, Saffloweroyl Cysteine, Safflower Glyceride, Superoxide Dismutase, Myristoyl Hexapeptide-5, Haematococcus Pluvialis Extract, Acetyl Carboxymethyl Cocoyl Glycine, Camellia Sinensis Leaf Extract, Resveratrol, Tocopherol, Carthamus Tinctorius (Safflower) Seed Oil, Hydrolyzed Citrus Aurantium Dulcis Fruit Extract, Parfum/Fragrance, Sorbic Acid, Citric Acid, Polysorbate 60, Sodium Citrate, Sorbitan Isostearate, Troxerutin, Tocopheryl Acetate, Retinyl Palmitate, Ceteareth-20, Pentaerythrityl Tetra-Di-T-Butyl Hydroxyhydrocinnamate, Butylphenyl Methylpropional, Hexyl Cinnamal, Linalool, BHT, Caprylyl Glycol, Phenoxyethanol.

Believe in miracles. That's the "lifestyle" branding statement philosophy makes, which is an approach that is decidedly different from their former positioning, which encompassed family values and spirituality along with a dash of department-store élan and endearingly clever quips. The miracle angle may grab your attention, but the company is also quick to point out that its history is steeped in providing products to dermatologists and plastic surgeons worldwide (so, in addition to miracles, philosophy has a serious side, too). Although its heritage may have included providing clinically oriented products to doctors, we have yet to see or hear of any medical professional retailing philosophy products. And that's a good thing because, by and large, most of philosophy products are resounding disappointments. Moreover, several products, including almost all of their sunscreens, contain one or more known skin irritants. We would be extremely suspicious of a dermatologist or plastic surgeon who recommended such products to their patients, and even more so if they actually believed some of the more farfetched claims philosophy makes.

Interestingly, when you shop this line at department stores or at the cosmetics boutique Sephora, what you'll notice is the preponderance of food- and drink-scented bath products, all in vivid colors or cutely boxed for gift-giving. It seems that somewhere along the way, the company decided to promote these nose-appeal products while downplaying their more serious-minded, simply packaged skin care. Perhaps the body lotions and bubble baths have become philosophy's bread and butter. Given the hit-or-miss nature of their facial-care products, that's not surprising. Then again, they've also heavily promoted their anti-aging-themed Miracle Worker products...

So what's to like if you're into the vibe philosophy puts out? Well, this is still a line with some well-formulated staples, including an AHA product, some retinol options, and a handful of state-of-the-art moisturizers. The products that get the most promotion at the counter are the ones you should avoid, such as the at-home peels, scrubs, pads, and anti-acne products. However, the somewhat confusing, conflicting image philosophy presents shouldn't keep you from considering their best products—but it's not a lifestyle brand in the sense that using the entire line will somehow bring you a more joyful existence, or significantly improved skin. The philosophy line is now owned Coty, a cosmetics brand primarily known for their fragrances. Their acquisition of philosophy is their first major foray into a widely-distributed skin care brand.

For more information about philosophy, call (800) 568-3151 or visit www.philosophy.com.

Note: philosophy opts to use lowercase letters for every product they sell, so the listings below are simply following suit.

philosophy Makeup

Minimalism is a big theme among philosophy's dwindling, uneven range of makeup. Whereas the color options from this company used to be extensive, well-organized, and at times clever, what's lining the counter now needs help, in more ways than one. The major issue is the plethora of ordinary products that cost far too much for what they don't offer, which is innovation and, in almost every case, selection. The line shines brightest (pun intended) with its lip color offerings, though the best products in this category are counterbalanced by glosses or lip balms with needless irritants. If you're a fan of philosophy's skin-care products and are considering their makeup, you don't want to try to build a comprehensive color wardrobe with it. However, you'd be wise to explore the handful of pleasant surprises here, including an excellent bronzing lotion, foundation primer with sunscreen, and the multi-use makeup brush.

Member Comments

Summary of Member Comments

  1. How would you rate the results? (4 = Best)

    2 / 4 Average
  2. Was this product a good value? (4 = Best)

    1 / 4 Poor
  3. Would you recommend this product? (4 = Best)

    1 / 4 Poor
Page of 1
  1. Kay
    Reviewed on Sunday, May 04, 2014
    • Value
      1 / 4
    • Recommend
      1 / 4
    • Results
      2 / 4
    Not worth the money
    • While the smell is nice on this, the color was very light. It was a golden/ yellow color, not much darker than a drugstore gradual tanner.

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About the Experts

Paula Begoun is the best-selling author of 20 books on skin care and makeup. She is known worldwide as the Cosmetics Cop and creator of Paula's Choice. Paula's expertise has led to hundreds of appearances on national and international television including:

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The Paula's Choice Research Team is dedicated to helping you find the absolute best products for your skin, using research-based criteria to review beauty products from an honest, balanced perspective. Each member of the team was personally trained by Paula herself.

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