07.01.2014
3
purity made simple one-step facial cleansing cloths
30 cloths for $15
Expert Rating
Community Rating (0)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:07.01.2014
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

Purity Made Simple One-Step Facial Cleansing Cloths ($20 for 45 cloths). These incredibly fragrant cleansing cloths are an exercise in disaster for your skin. Although capable of cleansing and removing most types of makeup (waterproof and long-wearing formulas don’t budge all that much) each cloth is steeped in potent plant-based irritants. Fragrant oils of sandalwood, sage, and amyris may smell great but what’s good for your nose is a surefire way to cause skin irritation—even if you cannot see it happening. Repeated irritation from fragrant irritants like the ones in these cloths can cause collagen breakdown and hurt skin’s healing process—two ways to stop looking younger and potentially stir up problems you’ll be looking to correct with other products!

Pros:
  • Cleanses and removes most types of makeup.
Cons:
  • Expensive.
  • Contains several fragrant plant oils that irritate skin and work against it being able to look and act younger.
  • Not great for removing waterproof or long-wearing makeup.
  • Must be rinsed from skin, so there’s little convenience to gain (believe us: you don’t want to leave ingredients like pepper and geranium oil on your skin all night).
Community Reviews
Claims

achieve clean skin in one swipe with purity made simple one-step facial cleansing cloths, now in a gentler formula that is comfortable for all skin types, including the sensitive eye area. these oversized, ultra-soft cloths are designed to swipe away dirt, makeup and oil in one super simple step, leaving skin feeling perfectly clean with no need to rinse. keep purity made simple one-step facial cleansing cloths in your purse, gym bag or travel bag to keep your skin pure and clean wherever you go.

Ingredients

Water, Ethylhexyl Stearate, Betaine, Sorbitan Laurate, Polyglyceryl-4 Laurate, Dilauryl Citrate, Gossypium Herbaceum (Cotton) Seed Oil, Santalum Album (Sandalwood) Oil, Salvia Officinalis (Sage) Oil, Rosa Damascena Extract, Piper Nigrum (Pepper) Seed Extract, Geranium Maculatum Oil, Guaiacum (Guaiacum Officinale) Extract, Cinnamomum Cassia Leaf Oil, Anthemis Nobilis Flower Oil, Aniba Rosaeodora (Rosewood) Wood Oil, Amyris Balsamifera Bark Oil, Daucus Carota Sativa (Carrot) Seed Oil, Cymbopogon Martini Oil, Ethylhexylglycerin, Sodium Hydroxide, Citric Acid, Phenoxyethanol, Caprylyl Glycol, Citronellol, Geraniol, Linalool, Methylisothiazolinone

Brand Overview

philosophy At-A-Glance

Strengths: Relatively inexpensive; some of the best products are fragrance-free; very good retinol products; selection of state-of-the-art moisturizers; innovative skin-lightening product.

Weaknesses: Irritating and/or drying cleansers; average to problematic scrubs; at-home peel kits far more gimmicky than helpful; several products contain lavender oil; several products include irritating essential oils; the majority of makeup items do not rise above average status.

Believe in miracles. That's the "lifestyle" branding statement philosophy makes, which is an approach that is decidedly different from their former positioning, which encompassed family values and spirituality along with a dash of department-store élan and endearingly clever quips. The miracle angle may grab your attention, but the company is also quick to point out that its history is steeped in providing products to dermatologists and plastic surgeons worldwide (so, in addition to miracles, philosophy has a serious side, too). Although its heritage may have included providing clinically oriented products to doctors, we have yet to see or hear of any medical professional retailing philosophy products. And that's a good thing because, by and large, most of philosophy products are resounding disappointments. Moreover, several products, including almost all of their sunscreens, contain one or more known skin irritants. We would be extremely suspicious of a dermatologist or plastic surgeon who recommended such products to their patients, and even more so if they actually believed some of the more farfetched claims philosophy makes.

Interestingly, when you shop this line at department stores or at the cosmetics boutique Sephora, what you'll notice is the preponderance of food- and drink-scented bath products, all in vivid colors or cutely boxed for gift-giving. It seems that somewhere along the way, the company decided to promote these nose-appeal products while downplaying their more serious-minded, simply packaged skin care. Perhaps the body lotions and bubble baths have become philosophy's bread and butter. Given the hit-or-miss nature of their facial-care products, that's not surprising. Then again, they've also heavily promoted their anti-aging-themed Miracle Worker products...

So what's to like if you're into the vibe philosophy puts out? Well, this is still a line with some well-formulated staples, including an AHA product, some retinol options, and a handful of state-of-the-art moisturizers. The products that get the most promotion at the counter are the ones you should avoid, such as the at-home peels, scrubs, pads, and anti-acne products. However, the somewhat confusing, conflicting image philosophy presents shouldn't keep you from considering their best products—but it's not a lifestyle brand in the sense that using the entire line will somehow bring you a more joyful existence, or significantly improved skin. The philosophy line is now owned Coty, a cosmetics brand primarily known for their fragrances. Their acquisition of philosophy is their first major foray into a widely-distributed skin care brand.

For more information about philosophy, call (800) 568-3151 or visit www.philosophy.com.

Note: philosophy opts to use lowercase letters for every product they sell, so the listings below are simply following suit.

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See all reviews for this brand

philosophy At-A-Glance

Strengths: Relatively inexpensive; some of the best products are fragrance-free; very good retinol products; selection of state-of-the-art moisturizers; innovative skin-lightening product.

Weaknesses: Irritating and/or drying cleansers; average to problematic scrubs; at-home peel kits far more gimmicky than helpful; several products contain lavender oil; several products include irritating essential oils; the majority of makeup items do not rise above average status.

Believe in miracles. That's the "lifestyle" branding statement philosophy makes, which is an approach that is decidedly different from their former positioning, which encompassed family values and spirituality along with a dash of department-store élan and endearingly clever quips. The miracle angle may grab your attention, but the company is also quick to point out that its history is steeped in providing products to dermatologists and plastic surgeons worldwide (so, in addition to miracles, philosophy has a serious side, too). Although its heritage may have included providing clinically oriented products to doctors, we have yet to see or hear of any medical professional retailing philosophy products. And that's a good thing because, by and large, most of philosophy products are resounding disappointments. Moreover, several products, including almost all of their sunscreens, contain one or more known skin irritants. We would be extremely suspicious of a dermatologist or plastic surgeon who recommended such products to their patients, and even more so if they actually believed some of the more farfetched claims philosophy makes.

Interestingly, when you shop this line at department stores or at the cosmetics boutique Sephora, what you'll notice is the preponderance of food- and drink-scented bath products, all in vivid colors or cutely boxed for gift-giving. It seems that somewhere along the way, the company decided to promote these nose-appeal products while downplaying their more serious-minded, simply packaged skin care. Perhaps the body lotions and bubble baths have become philosophy's bread and butter. Given the hit-or-miss nature of their facial-care products, that's not surprising. Then again, they've also heavily promoted their anti-aging-themed Miracle Worker products...

So what's to like if you're into the vibe philosophy puts out? Well, this is still a line with some well-formulated staples, including an AHA product, some retinol options, and a handful of state-of-the-art moisturizers. The products that get the most promotion at the counter are the ones you should avoid, such as the at-home peels, scrubs, pads, and anti-acne products. However, the somewhat confusing, conflicting image philosophy presents shouldn't keep you from considering their best products—but it's not a lifestyle brand in the sense that using the entire line will somehow bring you a more joyful existence, or significantly improved skin. The philosophy line is now owned Coty, a cosmetics brand primarily known for their fragrances. Their acquisition of philosophy is their first major foray into a widely-distributed skin care brand.

For more information about philosophy, call (800) 568-3151 or visit www.philosophy.com.

Note: philosophy opts to use lowercase letters for every product they sell, so the listings below are simply following suit.