11.28.2012
0
1
Skin Refining Thermal Treatment
Rating
2.6 fl. oz. for $34.50
Category:Skin Care > Scrubs > Scrubs
Last Updated:11.28.2012
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:No
Review Overview

This is a good facial scrub with the gimmicky add-on of ingredients that cause an exothermic (warming) reaction when they come into contact with water. You apply this scrub to damp skin get s brief warm sensation. It may feel pleasant, but that’s where the benefit ends. The warmth doesn’t open pores or encourage a deeper cleansing. The only problem this scrub has (well, beyond its high price) is that it is difficult to rinse. It’s an OK option for normal to dry skin, but Biore and Clinique sell similar scrubs for less money. For additional details on plastic microbeads in cosmetics, see the More Info section below.

More Info:

Plastic Microbeads in Cosmetics: This product contains polyethylene beads, which is an ingredient that has come under controversy in the recent past. In December of 2013, research published in the peer-reviewed journal, Marine Pollution Bulletin demonstrated that although polyurethane beads are non-toxic to humans, they are not filtered during sewage treatment and are accumulating in waterways. This means the beads have the potential to negatively affect marine wildlife who mistakenly consume them (Marine Pollution Bulletin, 2013).

Additional research published in December of 2013 demonstrated that polyurethane beads have the potential to absorb pollutants while in waterways. This research was conducted to establish the potential of absorption, however, and was not conducted using samples from actual waterways (Cell, 2013).

Beautypedia does not take an ideological stance in reviewing skincare products; rather, our reviews are based upon each product's potential harm or benefit to skin contingent upon what independent peer-reviewed scientific research has demonstrated. On issues like polyethylene beads in cosmetics or animal testing, we present the facts without judgment so that you may make your own decision whether or not this product is right for you.

Claims

You don’t need expensive micro-dermabrasion for a spa for perfectly polished skin. This luxurious thermal skin treatment takes just 1 minute! It starts by warming the skin to encourage circulation and deep cleanse your pore, then conditions skin with vitamins and powerful antioxidants.

Ingredients

C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Shea Butter, Aluminum Start Octenylsuccinate, Polyethylene, Calcium Chloride, Silica, Dimethicone, Cetearyl Alcohol, Cetareth-20, Glyceryl Stearate SE, Camellia Sinensis Leaf Extract, Ascorbyl Palmitate, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Melon Extract, Banana Fruit Extract, Grape Fruit Extract, Iris Florentina Root Extract, Hibiscus Abelmoschuus, Hydrogenated Lecithin, Polysorbate-20, Propylparaben, Red 17, Titanium Dioxide

Brand Overview

Principal Secret At-A-Glance

Strengths: Some well-formulayed serums and eye-area moisturizers; most of the sunscreens are sunscreens; good selection of targeted moisturizers; buffing scrub; small but workable selection of makeup.

Weaknesses: Expensive; jar packaging; the enzyme mask and peel; some SPF-rated products either lack the right UVA-protecting ingredients or are below SPF 15; most of the "spa at home" products contains needless fragrant irritants.

Is there something about acting talent or being beautiful that is equal to knowledge? We guess there must be, because having celebrities endorse products is big business the world over. It is simply amazing to me that Victoria Principal can convince women that they can have great skin like she does by using her skin-care routine. In fact, Victoria Principal's infomercial is one of the most successful ever.

Victoria Principal's skin-care products were originally formulated and manufactured by Aida Thibiant, a Beverly Hills aesthetician who ran a successful skin-care boutique and cosmetics manufacturing business there for years. Because the Guthy Renker Corporation that markets and distributes the line felt they no longer needed Thibiant to establish Principal's credentials, they severed ties with her in 1995. That isn't good or bad, it just means it isn't Principal's own skin-care genius behind these products.

This is a line with deals, or at least that's what they appear to be on the surface. Look a little deeper and these are just expensive products, and the deals are smoke and mirrors. You can buy groups of products for what appears to be a much-reduced price, but if you really don't need all those products, or if some of them are poorly formulated (like many of the sunscreens, products for blemish-prone skin, and moisturizers) you would be wasting your money, and that's no bargain.

The big deal with this brand today is the Reclaim line. Almost all of the Principal Secret Reclaim products contain the ingredient acetyl hexapeptide-3 (Argireline), an ingredient in many of the products that claim to work like Botox. Indirectly, the same claim is used for these products, which promise to soften the appearance of lines and wrinkles that result from repeated facial expressions, which is what Botox injections accomplish brilliantly. As a brief review of what we have previously written about Argireline, this peptide is synthetically derived, and supposedly has the ability to relax muscles that would normally contract to form the facial expressions that lead to wrinkles. According to the ingredient manufacturer, it does this by modifying the release of catecholamines, which are compounds that occur naturally in the body and serve as neurotransmitters, such as epinephrine, adrenaline, and dopamine. However, you would not want a cosmetic to affect any of those substances, because if it did, it could lead to a host of new problems.

Despite Principal Secret's enthusiasm for this ingredient, there is still no substantiated proof that it works as claimed. Further, we don't know the long-term adverse effects of applying acetyl hexapeptide-3 to skin. If it really worked to relax facial muscles, it would work all over the face (assuming you're using the products, and this line contains dozens of them, as directed) (Source: Cosmetic Dermatology, July 2005, pages 521–524). If all the muscles in your face were relaxed from topical application of acetyl hexapeptide-3, you'd have sagging, not youthful, skin. But then no cosmetics company would ever put such a claim on their products!

The makeup from Principal Secret isn't anything special. There are some good products, but nothing that cannot be found for less money at the drugstore. A strong point for color: it is well edited and designed to be simple, which many women will appreciate.

For more information on the products, feel free to visit their website www.principalsecret.com.

About the Experts

The new Beautypedia Team proudly and unequivocally maintains the commitment to help you find the best products possible for your skin. We do this by relentlessly pursuing and relying on published scientific research so you will have unbiased information on what works and what doesn't-and the sneaky ways you could be making your skin worse, not better!


The Beautypedia Team reviews all products using the same research, criteria, and objectivity, whether the product being reviewed is from Paula's Choice or another brand.

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