Intensité Crème Lustre

by ReVive  Intensite
Price:
$375 - 2 fl. oz.
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Category:
Skin Care > Moisturizers (Daytime and Nighttime) > Moisturizer without Sunscreen
Last Updated:
4/11/2013
Jar Packaging:
Yes
Tested On Animals:
No

Intensite Creme Lustre ups the ante, claiming that this moisturizer can inhibit “the loss of collagen while significantly diminishing visible spider veins, sun damage, and irritation. IGF (Insulin-like Growth Factor) tempers the effects of aging by decreasing wrinkles and thickening the deep structural elements of skin. Vital enzymes offer a non-acid alternative that unveils a vibrant layer of skin without harshness or scaling. Refractory brighteners polish skin with a radiant incandescence for a lustrous complexion that cannot be achieved surgically or chemically.” It’s amazing how words can create a sense of substance and magnitude when there is so little of that actually to be found.

Perhaps the most important thing for you to know is that while there is definitely research showing IGF has benefit in wound healing (Sources: Wound Repair and Regeneration, July 2003, pages 253–260; and The Journal of Immunology, June 1, 2003, pages 5583–5589), there is little to no research showing it to have benefit for healthy skin or wrinkles. What research does exist is controversial and meager (Source: New England Journal of Medicine, February 27, 2003, pages 777–778). Only one study, observing 12 men older than 60, showed it to have any benefit, but the study had such a short duration that it was questionable whether the safety data could be adequate.

Other than ReVive’s founder, Dr. Greg Brown, no one seems to think much of using IGF for wrinkles, and the concern that it may be problematic is not trivial. However, we don’t think you need to be worried, because the amount of IGF in this product is minuscule and the type of packaging makes stability practically impossible after the product is opened. As far as the other claims go, there are no vital enzymes in this product that can affect the skin. It does contain some good water-binding agents, but not very much of them, and at this price it should be filled to the brim with state-of-the-art stuff. Oddly disappointing is the paltry amount of rather boring antioxidants. One more point: This does contain palmityl pentapeptide-3 (Matrixyl), which has a good deal of hype about its benefit for skin, although if you are interested in that, Olay uses it and their price … well, you already know the answer to that one. Oh, and that bit about containing “refractory brighteners”? That merely refers to mica, shiny mineral particles that have nothing to do with skin care.

Powered by RES and Firming Enzymes, this intensive firming moisturizer helps increase elasticity and reduces the appearance of sagging skin. Gently exfoliates while light prisms help mask imperfections to unveil a vibrant layer of skin. Skin is strengthened for a firmer, brighter look.

Water, Dimethicone, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Diglycerin, Squalane, Jojoba Esters, Pentylene Glycol, Cetyl Alcohol, Stearic Acid, Di-C12-15 Alkyl Fumarate, Sodium Dihydroxycetyl Phosphate, Glyceryl Stearate, PEG-100 Stearate, Cetyl Acetate, Cetyl Dimethicone, Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Magnesium Aluminum Silicate, Glycerin, Glycosaminoglycans, Palmitoyl Pentapeptide-3, Mucur Miehei Extract, Tocopheryl Acetate, Retinyl Palmitate, Panthenol, Dipotassium Glycyrrhizate, Acetylated Lanolin Alcohol, Igf (Insulin-Like Growth Factor), Calcium Chloride, Polysorbate 20, Carbomer, Polymethylmethacrylate, Butylene Glycol, Xanthan Gum, Disodium EDTA, Diazolidinyl Urea, Methylparaben, Propylparaben, Fragrance, Mica, Titanium Oxide

Without a doubt, the founder of ReVive, Dr. Gregory Bays Brown, has some impressive credentials. He is a board-certified general and plastic surgeon who trained at Vanderbilt, Harvard, and Emory Universities, and received his medical degree from the University of Louisville. Realizing there was considerable money to be made in the realm of doctor-designed skin care, he launched the ReVive brand in the late 1990s, and it is now known as "A Plastic Surgeon's Non-Surgical Approach to Beauty."

It is nothing less than perplexing that there are so many doctors, from Fredric Brandt to N.V. Perricone, Drs. Murad and Sobel, and Patricia Wexler, to name a few, all claiming that their skin-care products are the answers for aging consumers who are concerned about "going under the knife" or about making an appointment that involves use of a needle. Can every doctor cure your wrinkles? And which one is telling the truth? Simply put: None of them. What they are doing, to one degree or another, is misleading the consumer as to what their products can really do, and every physician on the planet knows this to be a fact.

Brown does have one point of difference from his competition because he is the only one who uses growth factors (GF) in all his products. He was originally all about Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF), explained below, but now also offers products with Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF) and Keratinocyte Growth Factor (KGF), each explained in their respective product reviews. With all the company's talk about speeding up cellular renewal via growth factors and promises of luscious, dewy, youthful-looking skin, you may be wondering if this is a group of ingredients worth paying (a lot of money) for.

Growth factors are produced by the body to regulate various types of cell division. EGF stimulates cell division, primarily cell division of skin cells. There is quite a bit of research showing EGF to be helpful for wound and burn healing (Sources: Journal of Burn Care and Rehabilitation, March-April 2002, pages 116–125; Journal of Dermatologic Surgery and Oncology, July 1992, pages 604–606; Journal of Anatomy, July 2005, pages 67–78; International Wound Journal, June 2006, pages 123–130;and Tissue Engineering, January 2007, pages 21–28).

However, there is also research showing the effect EGF has is no different from that of a placebo, that it may not be effective at all, and that too much of it can actually prolong healing (Sources: Wounds, 2001, volume 13, number 2, pages 53–58; and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, August 1995, pages 251–254, and September 1997, pages 657–664).

One study showed that EGF had anti-inflammatory properties when applied to skin (Source: Skin Pharmacology and Applied Skin Physiology, January-April 1999, pages 79–84), though it has also been noted that it may promote tumor growth (Source: Journal of Surgical Research, April 2002, pages 175–182).

In general, the potentially frightening consequences of growth factors can come into play when they are taken internally, as in certain cancer treatments (Interleukin and Interferon are GFs), because they can be highly mitogenic (causing cell division), and at certain concentrations and lengths of application can cause cells to overproliferate. This overabundance of cells causes problems, one result of which is cancer. No one is exactly certain what happens when EGFs are applied to healthy, intact skin, but there is concern that with repeated use EGFs can cause skin cells to overproduce, and that's not good (psoriasis is an example of what happens when skin cells overproduce).

All of the research that does exist on EGFs has primarily studied their short-term use for wound healing. ReVive's products aren't about wound healing or short-term use, but rather about ongoing application for wrinkles, and working against the reduced cell-turnover rate that occurs as we age. Moreover, what established research has shown (including most of the sources mentioned above) is that growth factors, including EGF, do not work alone. Rather, their function is part of an intricate symphony that requires the playing of several "notes" for the "concert" to be a success. Adding a tiny amount of EGF to skin-care products in the hopes that it will work like it does when applied to a wound is sort of like thinking you can frame a house with wood and use nothing to hold the beams together except wishful thinking. We suspect the EGFs that Brown uses are most likely not the active form of the "drug," because if they were the risk to skin would be scary (and the company admits the ingredient is engineered in a lab, which means it's not identical to the naturally occurring EGF).

For more information about ReVive, call 1-866-986-7083 or visit www.reviveskincare.com.

Member Comments

Summary of Member Comments

  1. How would you rate the results? (4 = Best)

    1 / 4 Poor
  2. Was this product a good value? (4 = Best)

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  3. Would you recommend this product? (4 = Best)

    1 / 4 Poor
Page of 1
  1. TaniaT
    Reviewed on Friday, November 01, 2013
    • Value
      1 / 4
    • Results
      1 / 4
    • Recommend
      1 / 4
    Causes skin reaction in long term use
    • At first I got very fast results with this cream, my skin seemed brighter and smoother after a few days use. However, after 6 months of use I started to get break out spots and my skin went downhill, started to look patchy and became irritated. So I no longer use this product, nor would I recommend it.

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About the Experts

Paula Begoun is the best-selling author of 20 books on skin care and makeup. She is known worldwide as the Cosmetics Cop and creator of Paula's Choice. Paula's expertise has led to hundreds of appearances on national and international television including:

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The Paula's Choice Research Team is dedicated to helping you find the absolute best products for your skin, using research-based criteria to review beauty products from an honest, balanced perspective. Each member of the team was personally trained by Paula herself.

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