04.24.2013
3
Kind to Skin Smoothing Facial Scrub
5 fl. oz. for $6.99
Expert Rating
Community Rating (3)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:04.24.2013
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

This is a basic, water and mineral oil–based scrub that contains rice powder and polyethylene (plastic beads) to exfoliate skin. This could have been a decent option for sensitive skin if it did not contain fragrant plant oil. As is, the formula is a bust for sensitive skin and it’s also difficult to rinse due to the amount of oil it contains.

Note: The U.S. name of this product is Smoothing Facial Scrub.

More Info:

Plastic Microbeads in Cosmetics: This product contains polyethylene beads, which is an ingredient that has come under controversy in the recent past. In December of 2013, research published in the peer-reviewed journal, Marine Pollution Bulletin demonstrated that although polyethylene beads are non-toxic to humans, they are not filtered during sewage treatment and are accumulating in waterways. This means the beads have the potential to negatively affect marine wildlife who mistakenly consume them (Marine Pollution Bulletin, 2013).

Additional research published in December of 2013 demonstrated that polyethylene beads have the potential to absorb pollutants while in waterways. This research was conducted to establish the potential of absorption, however, and was not conducted using samples from actual waterways (Cell, 2013).

Beautypedia does not take an ideological stance in reviewing skincare products; rather, our reviews are based upon each product's potential harm or benefit to skin contingent upon what independent peer-reviewed scientific research has demonstrated. On issues like polyethylene beads in cosmetics or animal testing, we present the facts without judgment so that you may make your own decision whether or not this product is right for you.

Community Reviews
Claims

Our Smoothing Facial Scrub gently lifts dry, dead skin cells to help your skin look brighter and more even textured, plus it's a perfect blend of our purest possible skin loving ingredients with added vitamins.

Ingredients

Water (Aqua), Mineral Oil (Paraffinum Liquidum), Cocoglucoside, Oryza Sativa (Rice) Powder, Polyethlene, Vegetable Oil, Panthenol, Tocopheryl Acetate, Pelargonium Graveolens Oil, Anthemis Nobilis Flower Oil, Acrylates Copolymer, Acrylates/C10 30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer, Sodium Hydroxymethylglycinate, Dipropylene Glycol, Disodium EDTA, Methylparaben

Brand Overview

Simple At-A-Glance

Strengths: Inexpensive; Simple provides complete product ingredient lists on its Web site; good makeup removers; a few cleansers for sensitive skin; all of the sunscreens provide sufficient UVA protection.

Weaknesses: Poor selection of products for oily, acne-prone skin; no options for those with discolorations; several products that claim to be great for sensitive skin but contain ingredients that will make sensitive skin worse; mostly unexciting, dated moisturizers.

Simple is a United Kingdom–based skin-care line whose self-described claim to fame is that they're the "pre-eminent brand of skincare and toiletries products developed especially for sensitive skin." They also claim to be the United Kingdom's No. 1 skin care-brand, as measured by units sold, and given the line's wide distribution and low price point, the sales figures are probably accurate. But, although their sales claim may be accurate, Simple's claims about their products being good for sensitive skin are spurious at best because too many of the ingredients are completely inappropriate for sensitive skin.

Simple skin care states the following: “Our philosophy is: Simple says - never use perfumes, dyes or harsh irritants that can upset your skin. Simple says - settle for only the purest possible ingredients.  Simple says - trust the natural goodness in all of our products especially for sensitive skin.” Although that's a good philosophy, most Simple products don’t live up to their lofty goals. There are fragrant ingredients in many of their products, they use potentially irritating preservatives in some of their products, their sun protection products use synthetic sunscreen ingredients which aren’t the best for sensitive skin, and many of their ingredients are not natural (we know their claim of natural goodness doesn’t say outright that they only use natural ingredients but many consumers will think that’s what's being implied)

Unfortunately, there are no standards in Europe or anywhere else that regulate which cosmetic products can be deemed suitable for sensitive skin and which cannot. Therefore, any company can make that claim for its products, regardless of what the products contain. It's not all bad news though, as several of Simple's products are fragrance-free, which is a key starting point for all skin types, especially sensitive skin.

As mentioned above, the price point for Simple is low; in fact, it is one of the least expensive cosmetic brands you’ll find in either the United Kingdom or the United States. We are all for consumers getting more for their money, but in most cases with Simple you're being shortchanged, and that’s not the way to save money. Most of their products are either very basic or the frills and good ingredients are but a dusting in an otherwise ordinary formula. There are few outstanding products in this line, which is similar throughout the industry.

The anti-aging products are a great example of Simple's combination of low prices and lofty claims, with nary an ingredient on the list capable of delivering any benefit over and above a Band-Aid®. Even the most state-of-the-art moisturizers and anti-aging products won't bring about a significant reduction in wrinkles or other signs of aging, but using well-formulated products (and they don't have to be expensive) helps a great deal. Overall the folks behind Simple took their name too literally.

For more information about Simple, visit http://www.simpleskincare.com

Note: As of summer 2015, going forward all Simple Skincare reviews are based on the United States formulas and prices are given in United States currency.

About the Experts

The new Beautypedia Team proudly and unequivocally maintains the commitment to help you find the best products possible for your skin. We do this by relentlessly pursuing and relying on published scientific research so you will have unbiased information on what works and what doesn't-and the sneaky ways you could be making your skin worse, not better!


The Beautypedia Team reviews all products using the same research, criteria, and objectivity, whether the product being reviewed is from Paula's Choice or another brand.

See all reviews for this brand

Simple At-A-Glance

Strengths: Inexpensive; Simple provides complete product ingredient lists on its Web site; good makeup removers; a few cleansers for sensitive skin; all of the sunscreens provide sufficient UVA protection.

Weaknesses: Poor selection of products for oily, acne-prone skin; no options for those with discolorations; several products that claim to be great for sensitive skin but contain ingredients that will make sensitive skin worse; mostly unexciting, dated moisturizers.

Simple is a United Kingdom–based skin-care line whose self-described claim to fame is that they're the "pre-eminent brand of skincare and toiletries products developed especially for sensitive skin." They also claim to be the United Kingdom's No. 1 skin care-brand, as measured by units sold, and given the line's wide distribution and low price point, the sales figures are probably accurate. But, although their sales claim may be accurate, Simple's claims about their products being good for sensitive skin are spurious at best because too many of the ingredients are completely inappropriate for sensitive skin.

Simple skin care states the following: “Our philosophy is: Simple says - never use perfumes, dyes or harsh irritants that can upset your skin. Simple says - settle for only the purest possible ingredients.  Simple says - trust the natural goodness in all of our products especially for sensitive skin.” Although that's a good philosophy, most Simple products don’t live up to their lofty goals. There are fragrant ingredients in many of their products, they use potentially irritating preservatives in some of their products, their sun protection products use synthetic sunscreen ingredients which aren’t the best for sensitive skin, and many of their ingredients are not natural (we know their claim of natural goodness doesn’t say outright that they only use natural ingredients but many consumers will think that’s what's being implied)

Unfortunately, there are no standards in Europe or anywhere else that regulate which cosmetic products can be deemed suitable for sensitive skin and which cannot. Therefore, any company can make that claim for its products, regardless of what the products contain. It's not all bad news though, as several of Simple's products are fragrance-free, which is a key starting point for all skin types, especially sensitive skin.

As mentioned above, the price point for Simple is low; in fact, it is one of the least expensive cosmetic brands you’ll find in either the United Kingdom or the United States. We are all for consumers getting more for their money, but in most cases with Simple you're being shortchanged, and that’s not the way to save money. Most of their products are either very basic or the frills and good ingredients are but a dusting in an otherwise ordinary formula. There are few outstanding products in this line, which is similar throughout the industry.

The anti-aging products are a great example of Simple's combination of low prices and lofty claims, with nary an ingredient on the list capable of delivering any benefit over and above a Band-Aid®. Even the most state-of-the-art moisturizers and anti-aging products won't bring about a significant reduction in wrinkles or other signs of aging, but using well-formulated products (and they don't have to be expensive) helps a great deal. Overall the folks behind Simple took their name too literally.

For more information about Simple, visit http://www.simpleskincare.com

Note: As of summer 2015, going forward all Simple Skincare reviews are based on the United States formulas and prices are given in United States currency.