12.23.2014
158
Naturally Clear Green Tea Scrub
4.5 fl. oz. for $6.50
Expert Rating
Community Rating (3)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:12.23.2014
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

This scrub is medicated with 1% salicylic acid, but it will have no effect on your acne because the product’s pH is too high. Even if the pH were within an efficacious range, salicylic acid is mostly wasted in rinse-off products; it is best left on skin, but you don’t want to leave a scrub product on your skin. Silica beads serve as the scrub agent, and they’re supported by detergent cleansing agents. As long as you don’t expect this scrub to clear your skin, it is a good option for normal to oily skin—just be sure to not use it over acne lesions, because acne cannot be scrubbed away.

Community Reviews
Claims

This dermatologist-tested scrub can actually help to clear and soothe your skin as well as reduce redness. An active blemish-fighting ingredient fights the flare-ups, while 100% natural exfoliants encourage healthier, clearer skin.

Ingredients

Active: Salicylic Acid (1%), Other: Water, Hydrated Silica, Potassium Laureth Phosphate, Glycerin, Sodium Lauroamphoacetate, Sodium Methyl 2-Sulfolaurate, Polyacrylate-1 Crosspolymer, Citric Acid, Glycereth-18 Ethylhexanoate, Salicylic Acid, Kaolin, Disodium 2-Sulfonate, Camellia Sinensis Leaf Extract, Epilobium Angustifolium Extract, Olive Leaf Extract, Ascophyllum Nodosum Extract, Alteromonas Ferment Extract, Yeast Extract, Hydrolyzed Jojoba Esters, PPG-2 Methyl Ether, Fragrance, Glycereth-18, Phenethyl Alcohol, Methylisothiazolinone, Yellow 5, Red 4, Red 33, Blue 1

Brand Overview

St. Ives At-A-Glance

Strengths: A couple of water-soluble cleansers, a gentle microdermabrasion alternative; some good, inexpensive body lotions; excellent hand cream.

Weaknesses: Overly abrasive scrubs; ineffective anti-acne products; dated moisturizer; overall, the facial-care products are substandard, even if they are inexpensive.

Two things set this line apart in the minds of consumers familiar with the brand: the Swiss angle and their apricot face scrubs. This notoriety didn't translate to thoughtfully formulated products, though. Instead, most of the scrubs are too abrasive, and the apricot is simply there as an extract, never mind that in a scrub it doesn't have any significant benefit for skin. The same can be said of the selection of supposedly Swiss-based herbs. Most of them have soothing properties, but it doesn't matter to skin if the ingredients came from Switzerland or South Dakota. If anything, the whole Swiss angle is getting a bit tired. You can bet that there are no scientists working high in the Swiss alps to formulate these products. St. Ives is a line with very little worth considering, so feel free to breeze right by as you shop for skin-care products at your local drugstore.

For more information about St. Ives, owned by Unilever, call (800) 333-0005 or visit www.stives.com.

About the Experts

The new Beautypedia Team proudly and unequivocally maintains the commitment to help you find the best products possible for your skin. We do this by relentlessly pursuing and relying on published scientific research so you will have unbiased information on what works and what doesn't-and the sneaky ways you could be making your skin worse, not better!


The Beautypedia Team reviews all products using the same research, criteria, and objectivity, whether the product being reviewed is from Paula's Choice or another brand.

See all reviews for this brand

St. Ives At-A-Glance

Strengths: A couple of water-soluble cleansers, a gentle microdermabrasion alternative; some good, inexpensive body lotions; excellent hand cream.

Weaknesses: Overly abrasive scrubs; ineffective anti-acne products; dated moisturizer; overall, the facial-care products are substandard, even if they are inexpensive.

Two things set this line apart in the minds of consumers familiar with the brand: the Swiss angle and their apricot face scrubs. This notoriety didn't translate to thoughtfully formulated products, though. Instead, most of the scrubs are too abrasive, and the apricot is simply there as an extract, never mind that in a scrub it doesn't have any significant benefit for skin. The same can be said of the selection of supposedly Swiss-based herbs. Most of them have soothing properties, but it doesn't matter to skin if the ingredients came from Switzerland or South Dakota. If anything, the whole Swiss angle is getting a bit tired. You can bet that there are no scientists working high in the Swiss alps to formulate these products. St. Ives is a line with very little worth considering, so feel free to breeze right by as you shop for skin-care products at your local drugstore.

For more information about St. Ives, owned by Unilever, call (800) 333-0005 or visit www.stives.com.