11.07.2016
0
AGELESS Revitalizing Eye Cream
0.5 fl. oz. for $135
Expert Rating
Community Rating (1)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:11.07.2016
Jar Packaging:Yes
Tested on animals:No

AGELESS Revitalizing Eye Cream has a rich, creamy texture that feels great on normal to dry skin, with its lingering moist finish making the eye area feel extra-protected. Unfortunately, the choice of jar packaging means some of this eye cream's best ingredients won't remain effective as long as they should. See More Info for details on why packaging an eye cream in a jar is the wrong way to go—and why, in truth, you may not need an eye cream!

The other issue that's somewhat unique to this eye cream is the inclusion of fragrance. The best eye creams don't contain fragrance because of the aggravation it can cause skin. The fragrance issue alone makes this instantly unappealing, but the sky-high price really seals this eye cream's fate; you absolutely do not need to spend anywhere near this much to get a fantastic eye cream!

We always strive to present balanced information, so it's worth mentioning that this eye cream contains the mineral pigment titanium dioxide that provides a temporary brightening effect around the eyes. This can improve the look of dark circles, although you'll do better with a great concealer and of course a sunscreen around the eyes during the day.

Ultimately, this moisturizes dry skin beautifully and contains some intriguing ingredients, including many antioxidants—but they're not likely to benefit your skin due to the misguided choice of jar packaging (however pretty it is).

Pros:
  • Contains pigment titanium dioxide, which temporarily brightens the under-eye area.
  • Lingering moist finish makes dry skin around the eyes feel protected.
Cons:
  • Jar packaging won't keep key ingredients stable for long once opened.
  • Has a noticeable fragrance, yet fragrance is a skin sensitizer, especially around the eyes.
  • Shockingly overpriced given that there are brilliant eye creams for less than $50.
More Info:

Jar Packaging & Anti-Aging Moisturizers: This anti-aging formula is packaged in a jar, which means the beneficial ingredients won't remain stable for long once it's opened. All plant extracts, almost all vitamins, antioxidants, and other state-of-the-art ingredients are air-sensitive and begin to break down in the presence of air. Therefore, once a jar is opened and lets the air in, these important ingredients begin to deteriorate, becoming less and less effective.

Jars are also unsanitary because you're dipping your fingers into them with each use, contaminating the product. This leads to further deterioration of the beneficial ingredients.

When shopping for an anti-aging moisturizer, the ingredients that provide the most benefit for addressing visible signs of aging among many other concerns need to be in airtight or air-restrictive packaging.

References for this information:

Pharmacology Review, July 2013, issue 14, pages 97-106

Dermatologic Therapy, May-June 2012, issue 3, pages 252-259.

Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry, May 2011, issue 9, pages 4676-4683

Current Drug Delivery, November 2011, issue 6, pages 640-660

Journal of Biophotonics, January 2010, pages 82-88

Guidelines of Stability Testing of Cosmetic Products, Colipa-CTFA, March 2004, pages 1-10

Why You May Not Need an Eye Cream: There is so much you can do to address the signs of aging around your eyes, but it's not mandatory to use a product that claims to be specifically for the eye area. Any product loaded with antioxidants, emollients, skin-restoring, skin-brightening agents, and skin-soothing ingredients will work well around the eye area. Those ingredients don't have to come in a product labeled as eye cream, eye gel, eye serum, or eye balm—they can be present in any well-formulated moisturizer or serum.

Most eye-area products aren't necessary because many are poorly formulated, contain nothing special for the eye area, or come in packaging that doesn't maintain the effectiveness of their key ingredients.

Just because the product is labeled as a special eye-area treatment doesn't mean it's good for the eye area or any part of the face; in fact, many can actually make matters worse.

The number of eye-area products that lack even the most basic ingredients to help skin. For example, most eye-area products don't contain sunscreen, which is a serious problem if you aren't wearing the product under a broad-spectrum sunscreen rated SPF 30. That's because it leaves skin around your eyes vulnerable to sun damage—and that absolutely will make dark circles, puffiness, and visible signs of aging worse! Of course, for nighttime use, eye-area products without sun protection are just fine.

Whatever product you use in your eye area, regardless of what it is labeled, it must be well formulated and appropriate for the skin type around your eyes. You may prefer to use a specially labeled eye cream, but you might do just as well by applying your regular facial moisturizer and/or serum around your eyes.

Community Reviews
Claims
A powerful, antioxidant-rich moisturizing eye cream to revitalize and bring a brighter, more youthful look to eyes. Known for their ability to energize skin and visibly diminish fine lines, dark circles and puffiness, Peony and Honeysuckle extracts offer powerful anti-aging benefits alongside our anti-aging HADASEI-3™ Complex.
Ingredients
Water, Glycerin, Squalane (Olive Origin), Propanediol, Xylitol, Glyceryl Sterate SE, Cyclopentasiloxane, Behenyl Alcohol, Myristyl Myristate, Silica, Beeswax, Paeonia Albiflora Root (Peony) Extract, Camellia Japonica Seed Oil, Camellia Sinensis (Green Tea) Leaf Extract, Lonicera Japonica (Honeysuckle) Leaf Extract, Coix Lacryma- Jobi Ma-yuen Seed Extract, Chondrus Crispus (Carrageenan) Extract, Inositol (Rice Extract), Sodium Hyaluronate, Titanium Dioxide, Tocopherol Acetate, Caprylyl/Capryl Glucoside, Caprylic/Capric/Myristic/Stearic Triglyceride, Tetrasodium Pyrophosphate, Disodium EDTA, Sodium Acrylate/Acryloyldimethyltaurate/Dimethylacrylamide Crosspolymer, Sodium Dilauramidoglutamide Lysine, Isostearic Acid, Sorbitan Isostearate, Iron Oxides (ci 77491), Ethylhexylglycerin, Aluminum Hydroxide, Fragrance (Natural), Stearyl Alcohol, Alcohol, Phenoxyethanol
Brand Overview

Tatcha At-a-Glance

Strengths: Good cleansing oil; the eye-area mask is an intriguing formula.

Weaknesses: Often shockingly overpriced for what amounts to basic formulas; several products claim to lighten or brighten skin, but don’t contain ingredients that can do that (or such ingredients are present in such small amounts they’re unlikely to be effective); jar packaging; the enzymes in the face scrubs have zero effectiveness for skin; several of the serums and moisturizers are either highly fragranced or contain alcohol, or both.

The allure of ancient beauty treatments coupled with modern science is tempting for many people—and the Japan-inspired brand Tatcha plays that combination up to the max. As the story goes, Harvard graduate and businesswoman Victoria Tsai, had a chance encounter with a “modern-day geisha” on a trip to Kyoto, Japan. What followed was an introduction to a fabled book on the beauty secrets of the geisha, which led to Tsai’s desire to translate these secrets and tips into a modern-day skincare line.

We’re all for studying, learning from, and being fascinated by history, but relying on what someone (even a geisha) knew about beauty hundreds of years ago is like using pencil and paper to write a message versus using your mobile phone or computer.

If anything, what makes this marketing “story” even more ludicrous is that historically, geisha’s made their skin white by using a thick lead-based paint! Those are not the kind of beauty secrets to emulate! Simply put, what we know about skincare now wasn’t (and couldn’t have been) known back then, and what we know now fills volumes!

The hallmark ingredients Tsai and her team seem most interested in are of course Japan-inspired such as green tea, red algae, and rice bran which are supposedly mentioned often in the ancient geisha beauty book. Although all three of these ingredients have merit for skin, research hasn’t shown them to purify or do some of the other things for skin that Tatcha claims. What you really need to know is none of these are the solution for any skin concern or for any skin type.

One more point, the entire premise of Tatcha is built around Japanese geishas’ beauty routines, but this assumes that under all of their decorative makeup, geishas have (or had) beautiful, flawless skin. In all likelihood, some do and some don’t, but it’s quite likely that when unadorned and viewed close up, these women have the same types of skin issues as women the world over—save for perhaps fewer signs of sun damage, as most east Asian cultures are careful about avoiding sun exposure.

Enough about the marketing story because what really matters is the quality of the products and whether or not they are beneficial for skin. The short answer is this line has more problematic formulations than beneficial ones.

Chief among the concerns that keep us from getting behind this line are an abundance of fragrance (natural or not, fragrance can irritate skin) and several products housed in jars that expose their delicate ingredients to light and air.

Admittedly, it’s easy to get swept up in “what the ancients knew” and kept to themselves for centuries, only to have these seemingly amazing secrets finally divulged. We wish that were a wise way to find the best products for your skin, but despite Tatcha’s promises, your skin will be left wanting more.

For more information about Tatcha, call (888) 739-2932 or visit www.tatcha.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Tatcha At-a-Glance

Strengths: Good cleansing oil; the eye-area mask is an intriguing formula.

Weaknesses: Often shockingly overpriced for what amounts to basic formulas; several products claim to lighten or brighten skin, but don’t contain ingredients that can do that (or such ingredients are present in such small amounts they’re unlikely to be effective); jar packaging; the enzymes in the face scrubs have zero effectiveness for skin; several of the serums and moisturizers are either highly fragranced or contain alcohol, or both.

The allure of ancient beauty treatments coupled with modern science is tempting for many people—and the Japan-inspired brand Tatcha plays that combination up to the max. As the story goes, Harvard graduate and businesswoman Victoria Tsai, had a chance encounter with a “modern-day geisha” on a trip to Kyoto, Japan. What followed was an introduction to a fabled book on the beauty secrets of the geisha, which led to Tsai’s desire to translate these secrets and tips into a modern-day skincare line.

We’re all for studying, learning from, and being fascinated by history, but relying on what someone (even a geisha) knew about beauty hundreds of years ago is like using pencil and paper to write a message versus using your mobile phone or computer.

If anything, what makes this marketing “story” even more ludicrous is that historically, geisha’s made their skin white by using a thick lead-based paint! Those are not the kind of beauty secrets to emulate! Simply put, what we know about skincare now wasn’t (and couldn’t have been) known back then, and what we know now fills volumes!

The hallmark ingredients Tsai and her team seem most interested in are of course Japan-inspired such as green tea, red algae, and rice bran which are supposedly mentioned often in the ancient geisha beauty book. Although all three of these ingredients have merit for skin, research hasn’t shown them to purify or do some of the other things for skin that Tatcha claims. What you really need to know is none of these are the solution for any skin concern or for any skin type.

One more point, the entire premise of Tatcha is built around Japanese geishas’ beauty routines, but this assumes that under all of their decorative makeup, geishas have (or had) beautiful, flawless skin. In all likelihood, some do and some don’t, but it’s quite likely that when unadorned and viewed close up, these women have the same types of skin issues as women the world over—save for perhaps fewer signs of sun damage, as most east Asian cultures are careful about avoiding sun exposure.

Enough about the marketing story because what really matters is the quality of the products and whether or not they are beneficial for skin. The short answer is this line has more problematic formulations than beneficial ones.

Chief among the concerns that keep us from getting behind this line are an abundance of fragrance (natural or not, fragrance can irritate skin) and several products housed in jars that expose their delicate ingredients to light and air.

Admittedly, it’s easy to get swept up in “what the ancients knew” and kept to themselves for centuries, only to have these seemingly amazing secrets finally divulged. We wish that were a wise way to find the best products for your skin, but despite Tatcha’s promises, your skin will be left wanting more.

For more information about Tatcha, call (888) 739-2932 or visit www.tatcha.com.