01.28.2015
1
Liftactiv Serum 10 Eyes & Lashes
0.51 fl. oz. for $47
Expert Rating
Community Rating (1)
Expert Reviews
Last Updated:01.28.2015
Jar Packaging:No
Tested on animals:Yes

If only exaggerated marketing claims equaled great skin care, this would be near the top of the list, but of course that isn't the case. Regrettably, many consumers will be seduced by the spin and be worse off than when they started.

The showcased ingredient here is rhamnose, and Vichy waxes poetic about its power to transform your skin by making it plumper and more elastic. Aside from the fact there is limited published research about this sugar derived from the cat claw plant having any special properties for skin, one ingredient, no matter how miraculous (which isn't the case here) is not enough for your skin. Skin is the body's largest organ and requires a complex mix of ingredients such as antioxidants, repairing ingredients, and cell-communicating ingredients, which this product lacks.

But back to the rhamnose, which Vichy claims was tested on 400 women but any specifics about what that means is not provided. Assuming for a moment that this is a great ingredient for skin, given Vichy is owned by L'Oreal why aren't all L'Oreal companies from Lancome to Armani, and Garnier also using it? Those lines all have ingredients they laud as being miracles. Which L'Oreal company are you supposed to believe? In truth, there are lots of amazing ingredients for skin and many with impressive research behind them proving their functionality.

Other than the rhamnose, what you're left with is a ho-hum formulation that includes a small amount of hyaluronic acid and a peptide. While that is good for skin, it's just not a powerhouse combination.

What's bad for skin is the third ingredient, denatured alcohol. This type of alcohol can cause free radical damage and hurts the skin's ability to heal and lead to collagen breakdown. Not to mention that this much alcohol should not be put anywhere near your eyes!

Vichy states on their website that this is their most powerful anti-aging skin care to target the eye contour area. What a sad commentary and woe to those who consider Liftactiv Serum to be powerful in any way.

Pros:
  • Contains a few beneficial ingredients.
Cons:
  • The showcased ingredient rhamnose lacks compelling research showing it has benefit for skin as claimed.
  • Doesn't contain an array of important ingredients to fight signs of aging.
  • Alcohol is the third ingredient, and that can be damaging to skin.
Community Reviews
Claims

Our most powerful anti-aging care to target the aging eye contour area. Formulated with Rhamnose, a naturally derived plant sugar, clinically shown to visibly improve skin rejuvenation. This hydrating, lightweight serum has clincally tested on the appearance of crow's feet, under-eye wrinkles and eye lashes.

Ingredients

Aqua/Water, Rhamnose, Glycerin, Alcohol Denat., Dimethicone, Hydroxyethylpiperazine Ethane Sulfonic Acid, PEG-20 Methyl Glucose Sesquistearate, CI 77891/ Titanium Dioxide, Mica, Triethanolamine, Sodium Hyaluronate, Salicyloyl Phytosphing Sine, Palmitoyl Oligopeptide, Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide-7, Phenoxyethanol, Adenosine, Ammonium Polyacryldimethyltauramide /Ammonium Polyacryloyldimethyl Taurate, Chlorphenesin, Disodium EDTA, Xanthan Gum, Octyldodecanol, Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer, N-Hydroxysuccinimide, Chrysin

Brand Overview

Vichy At-A-Glance

Strengths: Some fragrance-free products; all the sunscreens but one contain either avobenzone or titanium dioxide for sufficient UVA protection; some commendable moisturizers with sunscreen; some good, inexpensive cleansers, and scrub for dry skin.

Weaknesses: Repetitive moisturizer formulas that rarely rise above the median for excellence; jar packaging is pervasive; the at-home peel/scrub kit is mostly disappointing; a couple of irritating moisturizers; no products for those with skin discolorations; limited options for oily skin.

Health is vital. That's the opening line on Vichy's catalog, followed by "Start with your skin." Perusing the opening pages of this catalog, it's easy to see how someone could get wrapped up in this L'Oreal-owned company's belief in listening to the signals skin sends us and then choosing products to address whatever problem skin is signaling you to correct. That might include acne, blackheads, eczema, discolorations, broken capillaries, and even excess oiliness. No surprises there, and it is sound advice to adapt your skin-care routine as your skin's needs (and signals) change. The problem is that Vichy's products, though well intentioned, are incapable of addressing several common problems, including most of those listed above. About all you can expect from most Vichy moisturizers is relief from dryness. That's it. Every product's claims "talk the talk," but they cannot possibly walk the walk because what's in them is, for the most part, standard, and without any research behind it to show that it makes a difference.

A big-deal ingredient for Vichy is their Thermal Spa Water. It is said to reduce irritation, strengthen skin's natural defenses, and provide free radical–quelling activity thanks to its trace minerals and salt. There is no substantiated proof to support these claims, save for a somewhat primitive chart Vichy provides to show this water helps reduce cutaneous signs of irritation (what it was compared to, if anything, is unknown). Two other L'Oreal-owned brands, Biotherm and La Roche-Posay, have similar special waters, each claiming to be mineral-rich. Yet if these are so unique and wonderfully beneficial for everyone's skin, why don't all L'Oreal-owned lines such as Lancome, L'Oreal, Kiehl’s, SkinCeuticals, and The Body Shop, use them, too?

As expected, there are some bona fide winners among Vichy's products, but using Vichy exclusively with the expectation that their products have the answer to whatever your skin needs to have fixed is like thinking green tea is the only food your body needs.

Note: Vichy is categorized as a brand that tests on animals because its products are sold in China. Although Vichy does not conduct animal testing for its products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brands state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law.” Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Paula’s Choice Research Team.

For more information about Vichy, owned by L'Oreal, call (877) 378-4249 or visit www.vichy.com.

About the Experts

The Beautypedia and Paula’s Choice Research teams have one mission: To help you find the best products for your skin, whether they’re from Paula’s Choice or another brand. By combining efforts, we’re able to share scientific research and remain committed to the highest standards based on our decades of experience objectively reviewing thousands upon thousands of skincare and makeup formularies in all price ranges.


Beautypedia cuts through the hype to bring you product insights and recommendations you won’t find anywhere else!

See all reviews for this brand

Vichy At-A-Glance

Strengths: Some fragrance-free products; all the sunscreens but one contain either avobenzone or titanium dioxide for sufficient UVA protection; some commendable moisturizers with sunscreen; some good, inexpensive cleansers, and scrub for dry skin.

Weaknesses: Repetitive moisturizer formulas that rarely rise above the median for excellence; jar packaging is pervasive; the at-home peel/scrub kit is mostly disappointing; a couple of irritating moisturizers; no products for those with skin discolorations; limited options for oily skin.

Health is vital. That's the opening line on Vichy's catalog, followed by "Start with your skin." Perusing the opening pages of this catalog, it's easy to see how someone could get wrapped up in this L'Oreal-owned company's belief in listening to the signals skin sends us and then choosing products to address whatever problem skin is signaling you to correct. That might include acne, blackheads, eczema, discolorations, broken capillaries, and even excess oiliness. No surprises there, and it is sound advice to adapt your skin-care routine as your skin's needs (and signals) change. The problem is that Vichy's products, though well intentioned, are incapable of addressing several common problems, including most of those listed above. About all you can expect from most Vichy moisturizers is relief from dryness. That's it. Every product's claims "talk the talk," but they cannot possibly walk the walk because what's in them is, for the most part, standard, and without any research behind it to show that it makes a difference.

A big-deal ingredient for Vichy is their Thermal Spa Water. It is said to reduce irritation, strengthen skin's natural defenses, and provide free radical–quelling activity thanks to its trace minerals and salt. There is no substantiated proof to support these claims, save for a somewhat primitive chart Vichy provides to show this water helps reduce cutaneous signs of irritation (what it was compared to, if anything, is unknown). Two other L'Oreal-owned brands, Biotherm and La Roche-Posay, have similar special waters, each claiming to be mineral-rich. Yet if these are so unique and wonderfully beneficial for everyone's skin, why don't all L'Oreal-owned lines such as Lancome, L'Oreal, Kiehl’s, SkinCeuticals, and The Body Shop, use them, too?

As expected, there are some bona fide winners among Vichy's products, but using Vichy exclusively with the expectation that their products have the answer to whatever your skin needs to have fixed is like thinking green tea is the only food your body needs.

Note: Vichy is categorized as a brand that tests on animals because its products are sold in China. Although Vichy does not conduct animal testing for its products sold elsewhere, the Chinese government requires imported cosmetics be tested on animals, so foreign companies retailing there must comply. This requirement is why some brands state that they don’t test on animals “unless required by law.” Animal rights organizations consider cosmetic companies retailed in China to be brands that test on animals, and so does the Paula’s Choice Research Team.

For more information about Vichy, owned by L'Oreal, call (877) 378-4249 or visit www.vichy.com.